Updated: List updated to include Jodie Whittaker and Jo Martin.

While most long-time Doctor Who fans will avoid trying to rank the Doctors, the truth is that every Whovian has their favorites. As Jodie Whittaker returns as the Time Lord with a penchant for weird fashions and boiled sweets, we thought it might be fun to take a look back at the Doctor through their regenerations and see who wore the part best. Of course, that opinion will vary depending on when a person discovers the show, their appreciation for the series writing backing the actor, or whims as capricious as the Doctor himself.


15. Peter Davison (classic series, seasons 19-21)

Peter Davison in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: A sprig of celery on his lapel; breathlessness.
Highlight: Uniting his previous selves to defeat his old teacher in “The Five Doctors.”

While charming and affable, Davison had the unenviable task of replacing Tom Baker after a seven-year reign. He also took over the part while appearing on two other BBC programs: the drama All Creatures Great and Small and the sitcom Sink or Swim. His era was marked by a stable of writers afraid of the storytelling complexity the show demanded and a producer looking to make the series more theatrical. Watching him in stories like “The Arc of Infinity” and “The Five Doctors,” he reveals a more vulnerable and thoughtful Doctor, but all too often, the rough scripts and overly lit sets illustrate a Doctor who was, unfortunately, unremarkable.


14. Colin Baker (classic series, seasons 21-23)

Colin Baker in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: Hideous taste, a love for his own voice.
Highlight: His quiet dismay when he learns his companion Peri (Nicola Bryant) was killed due to a Time Lord plot in “The Trial of a Time Lord.”

Following the human and vulnerable Davison, Colin Baker was intended as a return to the crabby, spiteful Doctor of old. After a difficult regeneration, the Sixth Doctor tried to strangle his companion and chose an eye-sore patchwork coat as part of his costume. It is still hard to say which action was the greater crime. According to the actor, the intention was to mellow the Doctor out as he regained his human qualities. Sadly, audiences did not want to see an unpleasant Doctor and the BBC used the situation to put the show on an 18-month hiatus. It returned as “The Trial of a Time Lord” and its verdict cut Colin Baker’s time in the series short.


13. William Hartnell (classic series, seasons 1-4)

William Hartnell in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: Flubbing lines, a quickness to anger.
Highlight: His farewell to his granddaughter Susan (Carole Ann Ford) in “The Dalek Invasion of Earth” still holds up as one of the great moments in the series’ history.

Despite being first, William Hartnell stands apart from his successors. Designed as a foil for the series’ real main characters at the time, the First Doctor is often crabby, selfish, and heartless. Once his original companions left and he became the lead, many of his rough edges softened. In hindsight, the first few seasons of Doctor Who reveal how he came to love the Earth, but the much slower pace of the stories and mid-’60s production values make many of his stories difficult to enjoy. And while his performance as the Doctor is often enjoyable, it is a very different Doctor Who.


12. Jodie Whittaker (new series, seasons 11-13)

Jodie Whittaker in Doctor Who Series 11 Costume Reveal (BBC America)

(Photo by BBC America)

Known for: Referring to her companions as her “fam.”
Highlight: Uniting disparate parts of herself to recover from the Master’s use of the Matrix on Gallifrey … and the word salad that immediately followed it.

After Capaldi’s grumpy, grandfatherly Doctor, Whittaker debuted with a youthful vibe and a motormouth reminiscent of some of the other, more clownish predecessors. But clowning around isn’t really the Thirteenth Doctor’s style. Sure, she enjoys her fun – and getting lost in verbalizing her own thought process – but there is a passion (and lots of compassion) to this Doctor and her wanderings. Nearly all of that time has been spent with the same trio of humans, suggesting this Doctor needs more of family unit than ever before. That direct support is important considering the discoveries she made about her past during this incarnation. Admittedly, the writing has not been on her side – leaving the character more of a muddle than she might otherwise be – but Whittaker’s Doctor approaches all of her adventures with the sort of smile and care you want from the character.


11. Christopher Eccleston (new series, season 1)

Christopher Eccleston in Doctor Who (BBC America)

(Photo by BBC America)

Known for: A short life, exclaiming “fantastic!”
Highlight: Announcing his plans to rescue Rose Tyler (Billie Piper) and defeat the Daleks in “The Parting of the Ways.”

The biggest problem with Christopher Eccleston as the Doctor is that we barely got to know him. A prematurely issued BBC press release revealed the actor would leave the series shortly before the revived program debuted. In the States, the series failed to find a broadcaster willing to carry it until after he was gone. And then there is the show itself. Still finding its footing, it goes from the highs of dealing with the Doctor’s PTSD to the lows of farting aliens assuming control of 10 Downing Street. All the while, the Ninth Doctor manically runs from situation to situation, madly grinning with his companion hand-in-hand. His one year of episodes only offers a glimpse of what the actor could have done with it if he had stayed the traditional three years. As we’ve learned in recent years, the nature of the production made it impossible for the actor to continue, but at least he has returned to the part via the Big Finish audios.


10. John Hurt (new series, 50th anniversary specials “The Day of the Doctor,” “The Time of the Doctor”)

John Hurt in Doctor Who (BBC America)

(Photo by BBC America)

Known for: Facing the end of the Time War, proper use of a sonic screwdriver.
Highlight: His relief as he realizes he doesn’t have to destroy his homeworld in “The Day of the Doctor.”

Perhaps an unfair ranking as the War Doctor only appeared in the 50th anniversary special, but Hurt’s few moments as a Time Lord are nothing short of magical. According to early storyboards, Eccleston’s Doctor was going to be revealed as the incarnation responsible for Gallifrey’s destruction. But his (understandable) reticence to return to the part led to Hurt becoming a secret regeneration in the Doctor’s life cycle, presenting all the qualities fans would expect from the Doctor on the worst day of his life. From Hartnell’s crabbiness to Davison’s vulnerability, he also echoed the classic series Doctors, becoming their avatar in the grandest of Doctor Who celebrations to date.


9. Jo Martin (new series, season 12 episodes “The Fugitive of the Judoon,” “The Timeless Children”)

Jo Martin in Doctor Who season 12

(Photo by James Pardon/BBC Studios/BBC America)

Known for: Appearing when you least suspect it.
Highlight: Revealing to the Thirteenth Doctor (Whittaker) that her favorite part in any encounter is saying “I am The Doctor.”

Jo Martin surprised everyone when her kind-hearted Gloucester tour guide, Ruth Clayton, turned out to be an incarnation of The Doctor from a previous life cycle, seemingly scrubbed from history by the Time Lords and The Doctor’s own mind. Now dubbed “The Fugitive Doctor,” Martin’s Time Lord is filled with a self-confident swagger that usually comes off as misplaced bravado in their other incarnations. But here it enhances one of the most steely-eyed versions of the character ever seen. “Time’s Champion” and the “Time Lord Triumphant” make more sense when you think she’s whispering thoughts into her successors’ ears. Despite only appearing on screen for 15 minutes, the Fugitive Doctor made a huge impression and Martin’s debut left us wanting the rest of season 12 to directly revolve around the Thirteenth Doctor’s search for this missing part of herself.


8. Sylvester McCoy (classic series, seasons 24-26)

Sylvester McCoy in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: Spoon playing; a panama hat.
Highlight: Coolly offering the Daleks the means of their own destruction in their final classic series appearance, “Remembrance of the Daleks.”

Initially presented as a clown, McCoy’s Doctor makes a startling transformation into a master manipulator by the end of the classic series’ final season. Warm and nurturing one moment, the Seventh Doctor could turn on his closest allies — but only if it meant furthering his long-term goals. McCoy reflected the change in the final season with a darker coat and a deepening of his voice, suggesting the Doctor was something older and more alien than we previously thought. Sadly, these ideas were never fully developed as the show entered its long hiatus.


7. Paul McGann (the TV movie)

Paul McGann in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: Kissing girls, claiming to be half human on his mother’s side.
Highlight: Remembering his companions in “The Night of the Doctor.”

Unlike Eccleston and Hurt, Paul McGann’s brief tenure as the Doctor led to a very long association with the character and the most tantalizing of “what ifs” surrounding Doctor Who. As part of an attempt to import the series to the States in 1996, McGann was the first Doctor viewed consciously for his romantic appeal. And he plays that new dimension for the Doctor brilliantly. Sadly, his TV movie is one of the worst Doctor Who episodes ever produced, but it suggests an appealing, brilliant, and vulnerable Doctor you wanted to spend time with every week. McGann would build on the Eighth Doctor via numerous audio adventures, culminating in his brief return to screens in the short prelude scene, “The Night of the Doctor.”


6. David Tennant (new series, Season 2-4)

David Tennant in Doctor Who (BBC America)

(Photo by BBC America)

Known for: Kissing girls (and at least one boy), calling time a “ball of wibbley-wobbly, timey-wimey stuff.”
Highlight: His determination while punishing the aliens who forced him to return to his Time Lord ways in “The Family of Blood.”

The most popular of the new series Doctors benefits from some of the best scripts ever written in the show’s long history. From “School Reunion” to “Blink” to the final moments of “Journey’s End,” the Tenth Doctor revealed previously unseen depths in the Doctor’s psyche, none more startling than his deeply rooted fear of regeneration and losing his Tennant-ness. He fulfilled the potential for romance first glimpsed with McGann, but took it to a whole new level with his long coat and rail-thin build. He also built on the weariness of Eccleston, becoming “the man who regrets” in the process. And in his wake are plenty of fans who regret that he ever left the show.


5. Jon Pertwee (classic series, seasons 7-11)

Jon Pertwee in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: Velvet jackets; Conjuring tricks
Highlight: Revealing a story from his childhood to calm his companion in “The Time Monster.”

Theatrical, yet more contained than just about any other Doctor, Pertwee used the role to break away from his reputation as a variety entertainer and played the part straight. In his era, the Doctor became a patrician hero. Exiled from Time Lord society and banned from travelling through time, he found a family with the United Nations Intelligence Taskforce. He could quarrel with them as intensely as the enemies they fought together, but it only reflected his fierce dedication to truth and a sense of righteousness beyond the self. At the same time, he could still have fun building gadgets and special cars, but it reflected as much about Pertwee’s own personality as it did the Third Doctor’s.


4. Peter Capaldi (new series, seasons 8-10)

Peter Capaldi in Doctor Who (BBC America)

(Photo by BBC America)

Known for: Scottish accent, ordering people to shut up.
Highlight: His proclamation that “I’m an idiot in a box, passing through, helping out, learning” from “Death in Heaven.”

Peter Capaldi’s Twelfth Doctor strikes an imposing figure as the show’s attempts to conjure up a regeneration closer to Hartnell finally paid off. Often as crabby and menacing as the First Doctor — and as a careless and self-involved as the Sixth — Capaldi also illustrated what the part looks like when a lifelong fan of the show, who also happens to be an Oscar-nominated actor, takes possession of the TARDIS. Admittedly, a number of the storylines during his tenure proved underwhelming, but Capaldi’s performance never ceased to be a delightful return to the days when the Doctor was unpredictable and scary.


3. Matt Smith (new series, seasons 5-7)

Matt Smith in Doctor Who (BBC America)

(Photo by BBC America)

Known for: Bow ties, devotion to friends.
Highlight: Giving Vincent Van Gogh a moment of peace in “Vincent and the Doctor.”

Unlike Capaldi and Tennant, Smith grew up without Doctor Who. Nevertheless, he found the quirky charm and ancient gravitas of the character so quickly you would think he has vivid memories of the show from when it was in black and white. Choosing to dress and model the character after an eccentric professor, Smith’s mile-a-minute speech pattern and frantically gesticulating hands led the series to its greatest successes in the States. Both young and old all at once, Smith’s Doctor could make you laugh and break your heart within moments.


2. Tom Baker (classic series, seasons 12-18)

Tom Baker in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: A very, very long scarf, Jelly Babies.
Highlight: Shouting “Cockneys!” when asked which tribe inhabits London at the beginning of “The Talons of Weng-Chaing.”

It is fair to say Tom Baker was born to play the Doctor. He’ll also tell you he never really stopped. Giving the Doctor some of his own alien mannerisms and vocal eccentricities, he became the definitive incarnation of the Doctor for decades. His place is well-deserved. Even in the worst stories of his era, Baker’s commitment to an outwardly flippant, but deeply concerned children’s hero never wavers. He also benefited from the continual presence of the show’s best writer, Robert Holmes, who either wrote or rewrote most of the Fourth Doctor tales from 1974 to 1976.


1. Patrick Troughton (classic series, seasons 4-6)

Patrick Troughton in Doctor Who (BBC)

(Photo by BBC)

Known for: Getting his companions to run, check trousers
Highlight: Calming his new friend Victoria with the knowledge that “no one else in the universe can do what we do” during a tense night in “The Tomb of the Cybermen.”

Except for Hartnell, all of the actors who have played the Doctor owe a tremendous debt to Patrick Troughton. Besides being the first person to ever face the scrutiny and potential ridicule of Doctor Who fans by replacing the lead, he also established much of the Doctor’s core persona. The indignant retorts, puckish retreats and grave proclamations of doom uttered by his successors involuntarily — or voluntarily in some cases — echo his performance. With the Second Doctor, we meet the meddler in time who wants to see the universe, learn. and help out. But unlike some of his successors, Troughton’s Doctor was unafraid to reveal he was out of his depth. Some of the best moments in a Troughton story come from his confidence being shattered when he realizes he cannot rewire a rocket or complete a math quiz. At the same time, he could recover that confidence and win the day. Often confounding his enemies and allies alike, he could also center himself to reveal a steely intelligence or a surprising warmth. All of it was delivered with a slight tobacco quality in his voice and a twinkle in his eye. Truly the sort of person you would want to see step out of the TARDIS.

Who do you think should take over next? Tell us in the comments! Comments Here

Doctor Who season 13 new episodes air Sundays on BBC America



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New year, new TV — that’s what we always say! And with these 11 fresh returning series this month, there’s plenty of it to go around. Whether you feel like scratching that nostalgia itch with Cobra Kai, singing along with Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist, or watching your latest binge through your fingers with Servant, January 2021 has all that and more.


What it is: Considering Doctor Who is about nothing less than fantastical adventures through the space-time continuum, it’s difficult to sum up in a sentence or two. Suffice it to say that it follows an alien Time Lord known as the Doctor (who’s been inhabited by a number of actors over the years, and now, for the first time, a woman) and their companions — in the two newest seasons known as “friends.”

Why you should watch it: Doctor Who is making a case for being one of those timeless sci-fi properties that’s earned a devout following akin to Star Wars or Star Trek. The decades-spanning series always finds ways to one-up itself, and with Jodie Whittaker making her grand debut on season 11 as the first female Doctor, there’s never been a better time to jump aboard. Season 12 wrapped after 10 episodes in March 2020, but it’s got one more installment up its sleeve by way of a New Years special (which airs Jan. 1 on BBC America), in which one of the Doctor’s most fearsome enemies is slated to return. Before you watch that, though, we recommend you begin your binge with the 2006 relaunch.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 110 hours (for the first 12 seasons of the relaunch)


What it is: A routine MRI goes awry for the titular Zoey Clarke (Jane Levy) when an earthquake shakes her mind beyond repair. She exits the clinic with the ability to hear people’s innermost thoughts, all communicated through music.

Why you should watch it: Actors don’t come packaged much more charming than Levy, and her skills are put to fabulous use on creator Austin Winsberg’s Emmy-winning series. Flanked by musically gifted co-stars like Pitch Perfect vet Skylar Astin and Glee-turned-Broadway wunderkind Alex Newell — not to mention industry vets Mary Steenburgen, Lauren Graham, and Peter Gallagher — this showstopping series hits all the right notes. Season 2 premieres Jan. 5 on NBC.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayHuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 9 hours (for the first season)


What it is: Cobra Kai charts the reopening of The Karate Kid’s infamous Cobra Kai dojo by none other than Johnny Lawrence himself. It makes for a modern-day twist on the classic 1980s film franchise, and now with its new home on Netflix (after an original launch on YouTube Premium), it’s become a runaway hit with fans new and old.

Why you should watch it: Nostalgia has been the name of the game through what has otherwise been an insurmountably difficult year. Luckily, Cobra Kai, from creator Robert Mark Kamen, has it in spades. Featuring committed performances from Karate Kid original players Ralph Macchio as Daniel and William Zabka as Johnny, this reboot feels as comfortable and entertaining as ever, and it’s further brought to life by an ensemble of young actors finding their own footing in the discipline of karate. Season 3 premieres Jan. 1 on Netflix.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours (for the first two seasons)


What it is: A teen Emily Dickinson was a rebel with gifts and intelligence well beyond her years; Dickinson is the story of how she set out to be the world’s best living poet in ways both unexpected and engrossing.

Why you should watch it: Creator Alena Smith’s hit flagship series with Apple TV+ left us wanting more the minute it started. Why? Well, Dickinson is herself a subject of intrigue, and played by an Oscar nominee like Hailee Steinfeld (who’s also attached as an executive producer), she’s certainly a compelling character. But set to a contemporary soundtrack, sprinkled with millennial-tinged dialogue, and boasting a fast-paced, fantastical, feminist aesthetic that leaves period dramas of yesteryear in its dust, Dickinson is simply unlike anything we’ve seen before — and that’s a good thing. Season 2 premieres Jan. 8 on Apple TV+.

Where to watch it: Apple TV+

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours (for the first season)


What it is: The gods are out to play — and out for blood — in this cult favorite series on Starz. Based on the fantasy novel of the same name by Neil Gaiman, American Gods begins by following recently released convict Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle), who’s employed by the mysterious Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) as a bodyguard. Diving into a world of dark magic, it is soon revealed that Mr. Wednesday is on a mission to unite the Old Gods against the rise of the New. Now entering its third season, you’ll just have to catch up to learn of their riveting successes and failures in that journey along the way.

Why you should watch it: Few series are quite as engrossingly strange and ambitious as American Gods, and that’s what has us hooked. It’s a timely commentary on the world we live in today, but set against the backdrop of a lurid fantasy epic. And to that we say: more please! Season 3 premieres Jan. 10 on Starz.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, MicrosoftStarz, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 16 hours (for the first two seasons)


What it is: A relationship drama turned coming-of-age comedy turned noir-esque murder mystery thriller turned courtroom procedural, Search Party is everything but definable — and that’s exactly what makes it so good. It’s the story of Dory (Alia Shawkat), Drew (John Reynolds), Elliot (John Early), and Portia (Meredith Hagner), who, on account of their own self-interest and general aimlessness, entangle themselves in the potentially sinister disappearance of their college classmate.

Why you should watch it: Brooklyn-dwelling millennials have been beguiling subjects for many a film and TV creator since Lena Dunham’s Girls, but never before have they been so exactingly (and excruciatingly) brought to life than in Sarah-Violet Bliss, Charles Rogers, and Michael Showalter’s incisive satire-crime mystery cocktail. And how lucky are we to have two new seasons in a matter of months? Season 4 premieres Jan. 14 on HBO Max.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, HBO MaxMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 12 hours (for the first three seasons)


What it is: Sean (Toby Kebbell) and Dorothy’s (Lauren Ambrose) life is turned upside down when a mindless tragedy leads to the death of their newborn. To help aid his despondent wife through her grief, Sean hires a nanny named Leanne (Nell Tiger-Free), against the better judgement of his brother-in-law (Rupert Grint). And it soon enough becomes clear that Leanne has a twisted agenda of her own.

Why you should watch it: Nothing is as it seems in this heady half-hour horror from creator Tony Basgallop and director-producer M. Night Shyamalan. And while Syamalan’s ambitions as a filmmaker at times get the best of him, everything here clicks to make for a taut, stunning freshman series that will leave you on the edge of your seat. We can’t wait to see what’s in store for Season 2, which premieres Jan. 15 on Apple TV+.

Where to watch: Apple TV+

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours (for the first season)


What it is: Like Batman before her, Kate Kane (Ruby Rose) is an ultra-wealthy heiress who decides to take justice into her own hands on Season 1 of Caroline Dries’ DC Comics series. Rose exited after those first 20 episodes, though, and Season 2 will hand the reins to Javicia Leslie as Ryan Wilder and our titular heroine.

Why you should watch it: With a Season 2 premiere episode titled “Whatever Happened to Kate Kane?” Batwoman knows the main question fans will have going in, and it’s ready to answer it. But as DC’s first-ever black Batwoman, Leslie is making history while kicking some butt in only the way the franchise’s famed caped crusaders can. Season 2 premieres Jan. 17 on the CW.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google PlayHBO MaxMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 15 hours (for the first season)


What it is: With Riverdale, the beloved Archie comics of yore get the CW treatment as a live-action murder mystery-thriller with intense high schoolers played by KJ Apa, Camila Mendes, Lili Reinhart, and Cole Sprouse. In other words, this is not your mom and dad’s heroic redhead.

Why you should watch it: We’ll say it: Riverdale ranks among the best teen dramas to come out of primetime since Gossip Girl, and the viewership and brand ubiquity it has garnered over the years is well deserved. As the classic Archie we know with a heaping serving of sex appeal and a dash of True Detective, what’s not to love? Season 5 premieres Jan. 20 on the CW.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 56 hours (for the first four seasons)


What it is: Euphoria charts the lives of a group of diverse, troubled high schoolers and their rainbow of experiences living in the 21st century — experiences befitting the series title, yes, but others all the more tragic.

Why you should watch it: This dark, gritty, hallucinatory hit from creator Sam Levinson not only marks a career-best, attention-grabbing turn from its Emmy-winning star Zendaya, but it introduces us to a whole new class of Young Hollywood along the way, among them model and actor Hunter Schafer. Mining real-world ailments of drug addiction, sexual abuse, online harassment, and more, it’s not always an easy watch, but it’s a worthwhile one. The long-awaited Season 2 teased its premiere last month with a Christmas special centered on Zendaya’s Rue; part of the special, which centers on Schafer’s Jules, airs Jan. 24 on HBO.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayHBO MaxMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 9 hours (for the first season and holiday special)


What it is: Set seven years after the world has frozen over and become uninhabitable, Snowpiercer charts life on a luxury train as it continues an endless journey around the globe and the social unrest between its upper and lower classes boils to the point of uprising.

Why you should watch it: Much like the train on which it’s centered, Snowpiercer never lets up. Propulsive and pulse-pounding while leaning into its various sociopolitical commentaries, it succeeds in expanding the word so brilliantly captured in Bong Joon-ho’s 2013 feature film of the same name (which itself was based on a trilogy of French graphic novels from the 1980s) while introducing us to new characters and more. Season 2 premieres Jan. 25 on TNT.

Where to watch: AmazonGoogle PlayMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 7.5 hours (for the first season)


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As the 2010s comes to a close, so do a number of beloved comedy series this month — cheers to you, Schitt’s Creek and Bojack Horseman! But not to worry: The rest of January has plenty of returning fan-favorites, plus an ultra-buzzy sci-fi sequel series decades in the making. Catch up on all that and more in this month’s binge guide.


Doctor Who 92% (BBC America)

What it is: Considering Doctor Who is about nothing less than fantastical adventures through the space-time continuum, it’s difficult to sum up in a sentence or two. But just know that it follows an alien Time Lord who’s known as the Doctor (who’s been inhabited by a number of actors, and now an actress, over the years) and his companions — in the two newest seasons called her “friends.”

Why you should watch it: Doctor Who is making a case for being one of those timeless sci-fi properties that’s earned a devout following akin to Star Wars or Star Trek. The decades-spanning series always finds ways to one-up itself, and with Jodie Whittaker making her grand debut last season as the first female Doctor, there’s never been a better time to jump aboard. Season 12 premiered Jan. 1 on BBC America — we recommend you begin with the 2006 relaunch.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 101 hours (for the first 11 seasons of the relaunch)


Schitt's Creek 93% (Pop TV)

What it is: Father and son co-creators Dan Levy and Eugene Levy pack in the laughs as the fictional father and son within the Roses, a millionaire mogul family. They are joined by Catherine O’Hara as wacky matriarch Moira and Annie Murphy as the ditzy daughter Alexis. When they lose their fortune, they’re forced to relocate to their sole possession: the town of Schitt’s Creek, which was bought as a gag gift years prior. The ensuing five seasons follows the family as they adjust to their new life and learn to call that small, unfortunately-named town home.

Why you should watch it: We love a success story, and Schitt’s Creek has one of our favorite little-show-that-could narratives of the decade. While always well-received and enjoyed by its niche Pop TV and CBC audience, this Canadian television series didn’t really bloom until hitting Netflix, where its bingeable 30-minute episodes — full, in equal measure, of both humor and heart — were eaten up by American audiences who became eager for more. Cut to 2018 Emmy nominations for best comedy series and lead actors Eugene Levy and O’Hara, and we’ve no doubt that season 6 will wrap the series on a touching — and hilarious — high note. Season 6 premieres Jan. 6 on Pop TV.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 24 hours (for the first five seasons)


The New Pope 90% (HBO)

What it is: From the mind of Italian filmmaker Paolo Sorrentino, The New Pope is a John Malkovich–starring follow-up to The Young Pope, which dramatizes the controversial rise of Pope Pius XIII (Jude Law), the world’s first American Pope.

Why you should watch it: As the first Italian series to be nominated at the Primetime Emmy Awards and the first television series to host its world premiere at the Venice International Film Festival, The Young Pope is nothing if not cinematic in scope and aesthetic — and led by Law and Diane Keaton on season 1, it’s got the star power to back it all up. Season 2 premieres Jan. 13 on HBO.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HBO Now, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours (for the first season)


The Magicians 91% (SyFy)

What it is: Based on the acclaimed fantasy series by Lev Grossman and from producers Michael London, Janice Williams, John McNamara, and Sera Gamble, The Magicians follows Quentin Coldwater (Jason Ralph) after he enrolls in Brakebills University for Magical Pedagogy in New York. What follows for the young magician is a collision between our world and a threatening fantasy world with nothing less at stake than reality as we know it.

Why you should watch it: The Magicians has all the straight-up drama that comes with magic, secret academies, and battles between good and evil — and it’s a whole lot of crazy fun, too. Season 5 premieres Jan. 15 on Syfy.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 39 hours (for the first four seasons)


Sex Education 95% (Netflix)

What it is: This British teen dramedy from creator Laurie Nunn tells the story of a high school outsider who, buoyed by the tricks he’s picked up from his sex therapist helicopter mom, begins his own sex therapy practice out of an abandoned bathroom — to booming results.

Why you should watch it: You’d be hard-pressed to find a 2019 series whose ensemble was quite as immediately loveable — though a bit chaotic — as this one. The pitch-perfect cast is led by Asa Butterfield as Otis and a scene-stealing, never-better (if you can believe it) Gillian Anderson as his mother, Jean; the nuances of their fraught and evolving relationship paired with the high school dramas of puberty and beyond make this a must-watch. Season 2 premieres Jan. 17 on Netflix.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 8 hours (for the first season)


The Bold Type 91% (Freeform)

What it is: With industry-specific dramas pulled directly from Cosmopolitan editor-in-chief (and series executive producer) Joanna Coles’ decades-spanning career, The Bold Type follows the day-to-day adventures of three millennial New Yorkers and best friends who work together at the fictional fashion magazine Scarlet.

Why you should watch it: From Ugly Betty to The Devil Wears Prada, the New York fashion magazine and media industry has proven a fine playing field for high-stakes drama and fantastic wardrobes. The Bold Type dives right in and still finds ways to make this well-documented world newly exciting. That’s largely thanks to a stellar cast led by Katie Stevens as Jane Sloan, one-third of the BFF and co-worker trio that also includes Aisha Dee as Kat Edison and Meghann Fahy as Sutton Brady. Season 4 premieres Jan. 23 on Freeform.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 21 hours (for the first three seasons)


Star Trek: The Next Generation 91% (CBS All Access)

What it is: To catch up on the Star Trek universe as shown in this month’s Star Trek: Picard, we’re recommending you revisit The Next Generation (and perhaps the franchises’ 2002 feature film, Nemesis) for a wintry binge. As the series that first introduced the USS Enterprise’s Captain Picard, played by the legendary Sir Patrick Stewart, TNG sets the stage for the 20-years-later action that befalls the captain after he disassociates from Starfleet.

Why you should watch it:  While the Picard creative team, including showrunner Alex Kurtzman, have emphasized that this series will be accessible to newbie Trekkies, a binge of TNG will inform your foundational knowledge of those revisiting the Picard world (including Data and William Riker from the trailer alone) while giving you a fine excuse to watch a classic!

Set 20 years after Picard goes into retirement and isolation, the new CBS All Access series marks the grand return of one of today’s most iconic heroes. The story picks up with the unexpected arrival of Dahj (Isa Briones), a young woman who turns to Picard for help following an enormous trauma, in turn reigniting the former captain’s desire to return to Starfleet. Season 1 of Star Trek: Picard premieres Jan. 23 on CBS All Access.

Where to watch: Amazon, CBS All Access, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 132 hours (for all seven seasons)


Shrill 87% (Hulu)

What it is: Based on the hit book by Lindy West and co-created by Alexandra Rushfield and Aidy Bryant (who also stars), this series puts a feminist, body-positive spin on the classic workplace drama as our hero Annie Easton (Bryant) finds her voice as a journalist and learns to love herself in unexpected ways.

Why you should watch it: Saturday Night Live stalwart Bryant is finally given a star-making vehicle with Shrill, which earnestly and humorously portrays the daily microaggressions plus-size women face in the office and beyond. Season 2 premieres Jan. 24 on Hulu.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 3 hours (for the first season)


BoJack Horseman 93% (Netflix)

What it is: BoJack Horseman (voiced by Will Arnett) was once the hottest horse in town, star of a hit sitcom and riding high in Tinseltown. Fast-forward 20 years, though, and he’s a depressive has-been — and our titular protagonist of this hit Netflix comedy.

Why you should watch it: It’s not often that an alcoholic horse and a fictionalized Hollywood full of as many flawed humans as talking animals teaches you about yourself, but this one does — trust us! There’s reason BoJack’s blend of pitch-black humor and weighty human circumstance has gained such a cult following over the last five seasons. The second half of season 6 — the series’ final episodes — premieres Jan. 31 on Netflix.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 34 hours (for the first five seasons and first half of season 6)


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Stranger Things SEASON Season 1 EPISODE 3 PHOTO CREDIT Courtesy of Netflix PICTURED Top 5000 Shannon Purser

(Photo by Courtesy of Netflix)

Netflix delivered a thrilling double-whammy this October with the premieres of The Haunting of Hill House and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, both of which serve up stellar moments of serialized horror. While the latter portrays the campy, occult end of the genre’s spectrum, the former paints a haunting portrait of grief with ghosts stalking the lives of one family over years. 

Those shows’ biggest scares us thinking about the best episodes of horror in TV history, so we’ve prepared a list of the scariest episodes of television ever. Among these fearsome moments are episodes of The Twilight Zone, Twin Peaks, The Walking Dead, and American Horror Story. But, in addition to those no-brainers, episodes of The X-Files, Stranger Things, Atlanta, and Doctor Who also strike terror into the hearts of viewers. 

So enter the crypt, lose yourself in the Zone, take a walk with the dead, then rank these scary episodes from most frightening to least below. And if you don’t see your favorite spooky TV tale on our list, tell us in the comments!


There’s a lot to binge up on going into this month — so let’s get right to it, shall we? Below, catch our roundup of 15 series boasting Certified Fresh seasons that are returning in October.


Will & Grace  (NBC)


What it is: Will (Eric McCormack) is a lawyer (and he’s gay); Grace (Debra Messing) is an interior designer (and she’s straight); they’re best friends who live in New York City, and they both have problems in life and love. Their zany sidekicks are Jack (Sean Hayes) and Karen (Megan Mullally), the latter of whom happens to be pals with one Donald Trump.

Why you should watch it: Few series can claim to have brought the situational comedy into the modern age, but with its fresh, incisive, and most of all hilarious take on contemporary life in New York city — while featuring a pair of gay men and their best girlfriends to match — Will & Grace is one of the series that did. The best episodes of last season prove a) why NBC revived this hit series and b) why it’s still essential viewing all these years later. Season 10 premieres Oct. 4.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 77 hours


Big Mouth 99% (Netflix)


What it is: Co-created by Nick Kroll and featuring the voice talents of comedy heavy-hitters like John Mulaney, Fred Armisen, Maya Rudolph, and Jenny Slate, Big Mouth is a coming-of-age series about awkward teens discovering their sexuality and more through the raging hormones of puberty.

Why you should watch it: We’ve seen plenty of naughty comedies in the past, but none of them excavate the triumphs and traumas of pubescent adolescence quite as fearlessly or uproariously as Big Mouth. Season 2 premieres in full October 5.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours


The Man in the High Castle 84% (Amazon)


What it is: Talk about a premise: The Man in the High Castle is created by Frank Spotnitz (The X-Files) and depicts a dystopian United States that imagines a world where the very worst has happened: Nazi Germany won the Second World War and currently reigns supreme.

Why you should watch it: Fresh off Amazon’s Emmys-sweep with The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, now’s as good a time as ever to go back and discover some other standouts in the streaming service’s catalog. First thing we’d suggest is The Man in the High Castle. Epic and engrossing — not to mention timely — it takes viewers into an utterly foreign world that still hits a little too close to today’s political climate for comfort (the way that so many of TV’s very finest manage to do). Season 3 premieres October 5.

Where to watch: Amazon

Commitment: Approx. 20 hours


Fresh Off the Boat 94% (ABC)


What it is: Set in the 1990s and loosely adapted from celebrity chef Eddie Huang’s memoir of the same name, Fresh Off the Boat follows a first-generation Taiwanese family who picks up from their Chinatown home in Washington, D.C., and heads south to Orlando, Florida, where father Louis Huang (Randall Park) opens a country-western steakhouse.

Why you should watch it: A refreshing take on Asian Americans for the small screen? Check. Well-earned laughs from a trio of talented young actors? Check. A heaping dose of ’90s nostalgia? Check. And the combined powers of the hilarious Park and Constance Wu (now of Crazy Rich Asians fame)? Check and check. Need we say more? Season 5 premieres October 5.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 22 hours


Doctor Who 92% (BBC America)


What it is: Considering Doctor Who is about nothing less than fantastical adventures through the space-time continuum, it’s difficult to sum up in a sentence or two. But just know that it follows an alien Time Lord who’s known as the Doctor (who’s been inhabited by a number of actors and now actresses over the years) and his companions — this season called her “friends.”

Why you should watch it: Doctor Who is making a case for being one of those timeless sci-fi properties that’s earned a devout following akin to Star Wars or Star Trek. The decades-spanning series always finds ways to one-up itself, and with Jodie Whittaker appearing as the first female Doctor this season, there’s never been a better time to jump aboard. Season 11 premieres October 7 — to get ready, we recommend you begin with the 2005 relaunch.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, MicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 90 hours


The Walking Dead 80% (AMC)


What it is: You don’t know what The Walking Dead is? You may want to check your pulse…

Why you should watch it: One of cable’s highest rated dramas returns with its season 9 premiere on October 7. Based on the comic book series by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie Adlard’s post-apocalyptic premise of zombies walking the Earth and ending mankind as we know it, the acclaimed series developed by creator Frank Darabont indulges in gore and “what if” fascinations. These are characters brought to life with bone-deep precision from a stable of some of TV’s greatest talents. You just never know when your favorite will bite the dust. (That’s admittedly part of the fun, too.)

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 86 hours


Black Lightning 92% (The CW)


What it is: While he thought he had hung up his super suit and street-fighting days of yesteryear for good, Jefferson Pierce (now a school principal) comes out of “retirement” as Black Lightning as street gangs threaten his city.

Why you should watch it: If you’re a fan of the Greg Berlanti–led DC Comics universe on The CW, then you know what you’re in for here, and you’ll love Black Lightning. But this series goes one step further by being an awesome first of its kind, spotlighting not only black superheroes on the small screen, but LGBTQ ones, as well. Season 2 premieres on October 8.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 9.5 hours


The Flash 89% (The CW)


What it is: Grant Gustin is crime scene investigator–turned–crime scene vigilante Barry Allen (a.k.a. the Flash), a lightning-enhanced fastest man alive. The story follows Barry’s crime-fighting adventures with a group of friends with their own special abilities.

Why you should watch it: You don’t gain an adoring following like that of The Flash without bringing edge-of-your-seat action and suspense, lovable characters and story arcs, and pitch-perfect performances week to week. Season 5 premieres October 8.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 66 hours


Riverdale 84% (The CW)


What it is: Riverdale is the latest TV adaptation of the beloved Archie comics of yore — only this time, it gets the CW treatment as a murder mystery–thriller with live-action, and hot high schoolers played by KJ Apa, Camila Mendes, Lili Reinhart, and Cole Sprouse.

Why you should watch it: We’ll say it: Riverdale ranks among the best teen dramas to come out of The CW since Gossip Girl, and it deserves the viewership and brand ubiquity to match. It’s the classic Archie we know with a heaping of sex appeal and a dash of True Detective. What’s not to love? Season 3 premieres October 10.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 25.5 hours


Crazy Ex-Girlfriend 98% (The CW)


What it is: Musical comedy series Crazy Ex-Girlfriend begins with our hero lawyer Rebecca Bunch quitting her job and moving across the country to live near her childhood boyfriend, Josh — whom she hasn’t spoken to in years. To say the least, it’s all uphill from there.

Why you should watch it: Whatever you do, don’t be put off by the series’ title — even if you’ve got one! Starring as Rebecca, Rachel Bloom is a musical genius, concocting show-stopping comedic melodies inspired by the best of Broadway and Top 40 week after week. And as if the comedy’s song-and-dance wasn’t entertaining enough, it’s buoyed by excellent performances and tight, creative scripts that tackle everything from broken hearts to mental health. Last season got especially dark, and we love it all the more for continuing to break the mold. Season 4 premieres October 12.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 30 hours


Supergirl 88% (The CW)


What it is: Ever wonder what the other surviving Kryptonians (what few of them are left) are up to while Superman is out there saving the world? Well, turns out his cousin, Kara Zor-El (a.k.a. Supergirl) is up to just about the same thing. This is her story.

Why you should watch it: It took until the second season for this DC Comics series to really nail down its tone with star Melissa Benoist and crew, but there’s no doubt that it now ranks as one of the most formidable hour-long outings in the superheroic comics-to-screen universe. Plus some behind-the-scenes trivia: Benoist is fresh off a Broadway run as Carole King in Beautiful: The Carole King Musical. We love a multi-talented Supergirl! Season 4 premieres October 14.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 45 hours


Arrow 86% (The CW)


What it is: How would your life change if you were stranded on an island for five years? It’s unlikely you’d turn into a caped crusader dead set on protecting his city with a bow and arrow, but to viewers’ delight, that’s exactly the case with billionaire Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell). Now he’s known as the Green Arrow.

Why you should watch it: Arrow is the series that first kickstarted the DC Comics universe for Berlanti and The CW, and for six seasons now, it hasn’t let up the fun. Season 7 premieres October 15.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 102 hours


black-ish 92% (ABC)


What it is: Funnyman Anthony Anderson stars as Dre Johnson, a black, upper-middle-class family man who — in a predominantly white neighborhood, school, and culture — still wants his kids to retain a sense of black identity.

Why you should watch it: Creator Kenya Barris is one of those writers who just goes there. Even in what some would call the confines of network TV — which, incidentally, has been seen pushing up against him this last year — he conjures stories in the sitcom structure that are resonant, timely, and fearless. Plus, they’ll make you laugh, too! Tracy Ellis Ross and Anderson are especially show-stealing. Season 5 premieres October 16.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 35 hours


Marvel's Daredevil 92% (Netflix)


What it is: Matt Murdock (Charlie Cox) is a blind lawyer who fights organized crime in New York City. He wears a suit during the day in the courthouse, but dons a mask when the fight continues at night and he becomes his vigilante alter ego, Daredevil.

Why you should watch it: As the first Marvel original series venture on Netflix, Daredevil had a lot buzz and high expectations to live up to. We’re glad to report that it did and then some. Certainly among the best-executed comic adaptations for TV to date, it’s gritty, character-driven, and entertaining. Watch the first two seasons followed by The Defenders season 1 before diving into Daredevil season 3, which premieres Oct. 19.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 34 hours


Ray Donovan 72% (Showtime)


What it is: Ray Donovan ranks as one of the finer character studies in recent memory, with Liev Schreiber playing the titular Los Angeles–area “fixer” with smoldering grit and Jon Voight as his no-good ex-con father. Ray may be the man L.A.’s rich and famous call to get out of trouble, but upon the return of his father, Donovan, a family man himself, develops problems of his own.

Why you should watch it: When Ray Donovan premiered on Showtime in 2013, it promised the arrival of an exciting new anti-hero. It’s since stayed true to that promise and hasn’t let up, bringing us into the hidden underbelly of Los Angelean elite and slowly unveiling the many layers of a complicated and troubled man. Season 6 premieres October 28.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 52 hours

Cobra Kai (YouTube Red)

61 TV Reboots & Revivals by Tomatometer

When The X-Files returned to Fox in January 2016, fans were apprehensive. Would the revival hold up over time? Could it make up for the original iteration’s lackluster ninth season?

Luckily, they had nothing to worry about. Season 10 received a Fresh 65% Tomatometer score as well as stellar ratings, and season 11 was Certified Fresh with a 79% Tomatometer score.

Alas, not all reboots and revivals are created equal. While NBC’s season 9 revival of Will & Grace is Certified Fresh at 86% on the Tomatometer, the CW’s new take on Dynasty fell flat with a 53% Tomatometer score.

On the flip side, some titles like streaming series Cobra Kai, a sequel to the famous Karate Kid films, become big hits. The YouTube Red show premiered May 2 and has maintained a 100% score to land in the top spot of our scorecard of shows based on previous titles that returned from the dead.

ABC’s Roseanne and American Idol revivals also recently joined our list.  Find out how all of the titles fared in their first new season (or TV-movie revival!) by Tomatometer.

Cobra Kai: Season 1 (2018)
100%

#61
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Cobra Kai continues the Karate Kid franchise with a blend of pleasantly corny nostalgia and teen angst, elevated by a cast of well-written characters.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Return picks up right where its predecessor left off, retaining all the cult classic's crucial ingredients and adding a handful of fresh twists.

#59
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: An increasing intensity and maturity are evident in Samurai Jack's beautifully animated, action-packed, and overall compelling fifth season.
Starring: Phil LaMarr

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Voltron: Legendary Defender honors its source material with beautifully expressive animation and impactful action.

#57

Psych: The Movie (2017)
100%

#57
Adjusted Score: 100097%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After three years, the gang reunite when an assailant targets one of their own.... [More]
Directed By: Steve Franks

#56
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus:
Directed By: Matt Youngberg

#55
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus:
Starring:

Queer Eye: Season 1 (2018)
97%

#54
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Queer Eye adapts for a different era without losing its style, charm, or sense of fun, proving that the show's formula remains just as sweetly addictive even after a change in location and a new group of hosts.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: A powerfully impressive -- and still relevant -- update on a television classic, Roots boasts remarkable performances, deep emotion, and occasionally jarring beauty.
Starring:

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: One Day at a Time breathes fresh life into the classic Norman Lear original with a lively, sharp, and proudly old-school sitcom bolstered by a surfeit of heart and terrific performances from Rita Moreno and Justina Machado.

#51
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Surreal, suspenseful, and visually stunning, this new Twin Peaks is an auteurist triumph for David Lynch.
Starring:

#50
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Vivid animation and creative reconstruction of the Carmen Sandiego backstory elevates this property beyond its edutainment roots.

The Flash: Season 1 (2014)
92%

#49
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: The Flash benefits from its purposefully light atmosphere, making it a superhero show uniquely geared toward genre fans as well as novices.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Bewitchingly beautiful and wickedly macabre, Chilling Adventures of Sabrina casts an intoxicating spell and provides a perfect showcase for Kiernan Shipka's magical talents.

The Tick: Season 1 (2016)
90%

#47
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Likeable characters add realism and heart to the tongue-in-cheek humor and high-octane action that fuels The Tick.

()
%

#46

#45
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Marshmallows, rejoice! Veronica Mars returns in fine form, capturing much of what made the series so beloved while adding new wrinkles that satisfy more often than they mystify.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: A captivating combination of riveting political drama and science fiction fantasy make Battlestar Galactica must-see sci-fi.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Fun, fascinating and feminist, Spike Lee's classic is born again for a new generation.
Directed By: Tonya Lewis Lee

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life provides a faithful and successful revival of the quirky, sweet, and beloved series fans fell in love with over a decade ago.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Though not quite as comical, Girl Meets World sweetly shares the nostalgia of its predecessor, Boy meets World, with its young audience while providing positive moral values for today's youth.
Directed By: Michael Jacobs

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Although it takes an episode to achieve liftoff, Star Trek: Discovery delivers a solid franchise installment for the next generation -- boldly led by the charismatic Sonequa Martin-Green.

#39
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Anne with an E uses its complex central character to offer a boldly stylish, emotionally resonant spin on classic source material that satisfies in its own right.

#38
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: A brisk, slick reboot of an old favorite, Hawaii Five-0's picturesque locales and attractive cast make for pleasurable viewing.

#37
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus:

Nikita: Season 1 (2010)
78%

#36
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Building on Maggie Q's strong central performance, Nikita is a strong spy thriller that's sleek and action-packed (if a little heavy with backstory).

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: By owning its own ridiculousness, 10 Years Later is a fan-pleasing addition to the cult classic series.
Starring:

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Though not as thematically rich as some of its geopolitical predecessors, Jack Ryan is a satisfying addition to the genre buoyed by exceptional action sequences and a likable cast.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: The Twilight Zone explores the strangeness of the modern world through Rod Serling's winning formula, creating a thought-provoking -- if not always spine-tingling -- showcase for Jordan Peele and his exceptional crop of collaborators.

Charmed: Season 1 (2018)
71%

#32
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Charmed's updates are as fun as they are surprisingly feminist -- and with a sharper focus, it could conjure up an even stronger show than the one that came before it.

Roseanne: Season 10 (2018)
69%

#31
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Roseanne's return finds the show's classic format, original cast, and timely humor intact, even if the latest batch of episodes suffers from sporadically uneven execution.

HE-MAN AND THE MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE, He-Man, 1983-1985

While it seems almost every show you hear about these days is based on a comic book, there is a fairly robust market in the other direction: comic books based on television shows. This has been true since at least the Silver Age of Comics (c. 1956 – c.1970) when publishers like DC Comics, Dell, and Gold Key published monthly titles based on television shows like Leave It to Beaver and The Twilight Zone. In more recent times, you were just as likely to see a cartoon with a companion comic book than not.

Then there are the strange outliers like Masters of the Universe, which initially told its story in the form of minicomics available within the packaging of the various action figures, playsets, and vehicles. The cartoon series, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, cherry-picked some of the minicomics ideas for its own continuity, which in turn inspired DC’s Masters of the Universe series a decade or so later.

While many of these titles were quick tie-in comics with little heart, many manage to reflect their sources and turn into successful continuations — or even longer lasting series in their own right. With that in mind, here are five comic book titles which excelled at making what works on TV work in the panels and pages of comic books.


Buffy the Vampire Slayer 83%

BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Season 3, 1996-2003 TM and Copyright (c) 20th Century Fox Film Corp. All rights reserved. Courtesy: Everett Collection

Perhaps the most commercially successful television to comic book transition is Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Beginning in 1998, while the show starring Sarah Michelle Gellar (pictured) was still airing, Dark Horse Comics began to publish tie-in comics detailing new adventures. While some stories took place between episodes or between seasons, the canonicity – whether or not they mattered to the television series – was debatable. In 2001, Buffy creator Joss Whedon began an eight-issue series called Fray. It featured a future Slayer named Melaka Fray and was one of the first high-profile stories to be considered canon with the television show.

Both the television series and Dark Horse’s ongoing Buffy comic wrapped up in 2003, but the comic wasn’t dormant for long. In 2007, the company announced a new direction for their Buffy brand: Season Eight. Considered an official continuation of the television series following its season 7 finale, Whedon and writers like Lost’s Brian K. Vaughn, Drew Goddard, and Buffy alumn Jane Espenseon followed Buffy as she directed a band of Slayers, psychics, witches, and other supernaturally inclined allies. The series took on a more epic scale with international ramifications and a “Big Bad” who hoped to end the Slayers and magic itself. The series ran until 2011, when it was replaced with a Season Nine title and spin-offs like Angel & Faith and Spike: A Dark Place.

After the sprawling Season Eight tale, Whedon and his collaborators chose to return to the TV show’s emphasis on the characters. New seasons have continued intermittently with a four-issue Season Twelve set to begin in June. It is slated to be the final canonical comic book season of Buffy, wrapping up a story Whedon began over 20 years ago.


The Prisoner 100%

THE PRISONER, Patrick McGoohan, 'Free For All', (aired Oct. 22, 1967), 1967-68

The classic 1960s spy series about an abducted former agent, dubbed “Number 6” by his captors, nearly became a Jack Kirby production when he drew pages for a Prisoner comic book series in the early 1970s. It never materialized, but the pages he produced will soon be available to the public as The Prisoner: Original Art Edition from Titan Comics in July. The collection will include Kirby’s incomplete adaptation of the series pilot and 18 pages of a separate story by writer Steve Englehart and artist Gil Kane.

A second attempt to adapt The Prisoner occurred in the late 1980s when DC Comics released the four-issue prestige miniseries The Prisoner: Shattered Visage. Written by Dean Motter with art by Mark Askwith, the miniseries hoped to answer some of the questions left behind by the television series baffling conclusion; though a text prologue in the collected edition dismissed the finale as a drug-induced hallucination. Picking up 20 years later, former British intelligence agent Alice Drake washes up on the shores of the Village and discovers a lone Villager, a man who resembles the star of the television series, but answers to no name or number. He immediately dubs her “Number 6.” The pair tour the disused Village until the arrival of its former head administrator, a member of Parliament known only as “Number 2” who spent the last 20 years in prison and published a tell-all book about the retirement home for spies. Meanwhile, Alice’s husband has his own reasons for locating the Village, which may or may not have something to do with the stockpile of nuclear weapons left behind by the site’s creator, Number 1.

Askwith’s moody art makes it a compelling, if difficult, read. Though tacitly approved by series creator Patrick McGoohan — Motter was latter told “he didn’t hate it” — fans recoiled from its choice to characterize the final episode as a drug trip and return to the more conventional spy tone of the early episodes. Nonetheless, it maintains the characterization of the McGoohan’s lone wolf ex-agent while leading the final Number 2 into a place of madness. Since it divides fans as much as the series finale, it carries the heart of The Prisoner into its pages.

A new Prisoner comic book series from Titan debuted this week. Written by Peter Milligan and drawn by Colin Lorimer, it begins a new Village tale with a new Number 6.


Doctor Who 92%

Peter Capaldi in Doctor Who (Simon Ridgway / BBC AMERICA)

Like the series upon which they are based, Doctor Who comics share its longevity and ability to weather change. The program’s connection to comics stretches back almost as far as the television series itself, appearing in comic strip form in UK anthology titles like Countdown and TV Comic. But due to strange licensing deals, the first two Doctors appeared with a pair of child companions made especially for the strip, establishing a new and bizarre canon from the word go.

Eventually, successive creative teams of the strip were allowed to use the Doctor’s TV companions and newer artists were more successful at rendering the various lead actors from the television show. Nonetheless, the Doctor Who strip reserved the right to create its own companions and stories while following lock-step with the television show’s major cast changes.

Comic book royalty like Alan Moore, Watchmen artist Dave Gibbons, and Happy!’s Grant Morrison worked on the strip in the 1980s. The stories began to look and feel more like the television show, though Morrison’s stories would see the Sixth Doctor adventuring with a talking penguin and reuniting with former companion Jamie McCrimmon. He also offered an alternative origin for the Cybermen in a story which linked up two early Doctor Who television stories.

After the original television series’ conclusion in 1989, the strip continued in the pages of Doctor Who Magazine. Published by Marvel’s UK branch at the time, the Doctor — in his Sylvester McCoy form — would find himself appearing in Marvel UK titles like Death’s Head, making him an occasional visitor to the Marvel Universe.

While the strip has continued without pause for decades, dedicated Doctor Who comic books have a spottier history. Marvel occasionally reprinted Doctor Who Magazine strips in comic book format for the U.S. market, but it never took off. Comic book publisher IDW released a number of Doctor Who miniseries in the mid-2000s. Currently, Titan Comics publishes a number of Doctor Who titles centered around the New Series Doctors (and, like the strips, all-new exclusive companion characters) with the occasional miniseries featuring a classic Doctor. In 2015, the individual series crossed over to bring the Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Doctors together; though, the earlier Doctors refused to recognize the Twelfth as their future self at first. Titan already has plans to publish Thirteenth Doctor comics alongside the debut of new series star Jodie Whittaker in the fall.


Batman: The Animated Series

BATMAN: THE ANIMATED SERIES, (from left): Batman, Catwoman, 1992-95. © Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Everett Collection

Riding on the success of Batman: The Animated Series, DC Comics quickly put into production a new Batman series, The Batman Adventures, based on the cartoon’s look and tone in 1992. With writing (for the most part) by Kelley Puckett and art by Mike Parobeck and Rick Burchett, each issue told a story in the TAS mold, but the most successful Batman Adventures issue was the Mad Love special. Written by TAS scriptwriter Paul Dini and illustrated by executive producer Bruce Timm, the special explored the strange attraction Harley Quinn felt for the Joker, firming an element of the character that now spans into filmland. Thanks to Dini and Timm’s involvement, the special issue was later adapted into an episode of the series, as was a later holiday-themed special issue.

As the animated series was rebranded, so was the comic book series, molting into The Batman and Robin Adventures in 1995. Burchett returned to draw the 25-issue series while Ty Templeton took over as writer. The format finally wrapped up in 2004 when DC began to publish comics based on the then-airing The Batman Strikes! animated series.

Over the course of the Adventures titles, they became one of the company’s few children’s titles to succeed despite a number of initiatives to get kids back into comics. Maintaining the look and feel of the animated series was key to its success and the success of Adventures titles based on Superman: The Animated Series and the two Timm-produced Justice League cartoon series.


The Transformers

The Transformers: The Complete Original Series trailer screencap (Shout Factory)

Thanks to Hasbro’s relationship with Marvel Comics —  which grew from their work developing G.I. Joe characters in the early part of the 1980s — The Transformers comic book predates the 1984 animated series by several months. Their concurrent development meant the two would have diverging concepts for characters, backstory, and even the reason the Transformers crash-landed on Earth in the first place. The early issues of the Marvel series also saw cameos by Marvel characters like Spider-Man. For many longtime fans, the Marvel comic book is the canon for Transformers with a Grimlock known for his disdain of humans and a timeline that never jumped forward to 2005 (as seen in the animated Transformers: The Movie).

Of course, the nature of that cannon is somewhat muddled as British writer Simon Furman would add more material to the U.K.’s weekly Transformer series. He eventually took over plotting duties of the U.S. monthly series, adding concepts like Transformer creator Primus to the lore; in fact, it may surprise those who mainly remember the 1980s cartoon that much of the modern Transformer history — both in the films and current IDW comic books — has its roots in the Marvel comic book series.

Dreamwave Productions began publishing Transformers comic books in 2001, melding the comic book history Marvel created with elements of the classic cartoon. They even had ambitious plans to incorporate the Beast Wars series into a single, sensible canon. Their master plan was not to be, as the company went bankrupt. IDW took over the license in 2005 and started over. Initiated by Furman, the IDW continuity continues to this day with lesser known characters like Cyclonus and Tailgate emerging as fan favorite characters and new toy products like Windblade making successful leaps into pages of the company’s ongoing Transformers comic book. Sadly, it is about to end, as IDW has planned for a major reboot of their Transformers comics in September.


Vikings (History Channel)

While the five titles listed represent some of the most creatively and financially successful television-to-comics transitions, they are no means the only comics based on TV shows to be found. Series like CSI, Adventure Time, VikingsThe Bionic Woman, Dark Shadows, and Star Trek all found their way to comic book pages. And for at least one reader, they were the best comics to be found. Though often subordinate to their television counterparts, these titles can find unexpected lives and, like The Transformers, feed right back into the main part of the brand. Sometimes, they even breathe more life into a long-departed television show.

This week on streaming video, we’ve got a couple of fan favorite TV shows, a new adventure for Pee-wee Herman, some notable smaller films, some classics, and more. Read on for the full list.


New on Amazon Prime

 

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) 99%

One of the most influential horror films ever made, Robert Wiene’s silent masterpiece about a sleepwalking killer boasts some of cinema’s most expressionistic set design.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Doctor Who: Season 1 (2005) 83%

Want to catch up on the good Doctor’s adventures? Beginning on March 27, Amazon Prime will have seasons one through eight, as well as all the holiday specials, available to stream. If you can’t wait that long, you can always pay for them now.

Available March 27 on: Amazon Prime


Catastrophe: Season 2 (2015) 100%

Rob Delaney and Sharon Horgan star in this comedy about a British woman and American tourist who decide to stay together after a brief encounter results in a pregnancy.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Orphan Black: Season 3 (2015) 83%

Tatiana Maslany stars in this sci-fi drama series about a group of clones who fall into a conspiratorial whirlwind of mystery and deception.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on Netflix

 

Batkid Begins: The Wish Heard Around the World (2015) 82%

This Certified Fresh documentary shows how an ailing five-year-old’s wish to be a superhero for a day became a viral sensation.

Available now on: Netflix


He Never Died (2015) 88%

Henry Rollins stars in this horror comedy about a grizzled depressive who literally cannot expire.

Available now on: Netflix


Pee-wee's Big Holiday (2016) 80%

Paul Reubens reprises his role as the wacky, innocent man-child, who decides to take his first vacation after an inspiring encounter with a stranger (Joe Manganiello).

Available now on: Netflix


The Falling (2014) 73%

This drama tells the tale of a mysterious fainting epidemic at an all-girls boarding school in Britain.

Available now on: Netflix


Happy Valley: Season 2 (2016) 100%

Sarah Lancashire returns as Catherine Cawood, a West Yorkshire police officer who finds herself embroiled in another investigation when she’s implicated in a string of murders.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Fandor

 

The Square (2013) 100%

This Certified Fresh documentary chronicles contemporary politics of Egypt, beginning with the demonstrations in Tahrir Square in early 2011.

Available now on: Fandor


Amarcord (1973) 87%

Federico Fellini’s episodic look at the colorful citizens of his hometown won the 1974 Best Foreign Film Oscar.

Available now on: Fandor


Trophy Wife (2010) 83%

Catherine Deneuve and Gérard Depardieu star in this Certified Fresh comedy about a romance between an umbrella factory owner’s wife and a labor leader.

Available now on: Fandor


Hara-Kiri (1963) 100%

A classic samurai drama from the great Masaki Kobayashi meditates on codes of honor among warriors in post-feudal Japan.

Available now on: Fandor


Available to Purchase

 

The Revenant (2015) 78%

Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hardy in Alejandro González Iñárritu‘s Certified Fresh, Oscar-winning drama about a fur trapper seeking vengeance after being double crossed and left for dead in the harsh wilderness.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu

Before you know it, the fall TV season will be here, so we’ve pulled together some shows you should catch up on right now — including some long-runs that you’ll want to start immediately. Plus, August welcomes select Fresh titles to streaming and home video that you might want to add to your queue this month!


Heroes: Season 1 (2006) 83%

What it is: A group of unrelated, ordinary people develop superhuman abilities and need to learn how to master their newly found powers and protect themselves against a mysterious organization and other superhumans (including Zachary Quinto in his first big role as the villain Sylar). The series is divided into five “volumes,” each one with a different story arc similar to a comic book.

Why you should watch it: Heroes‘ first season got a tremendously positive critical reaction, and pleased audiences with a mix of great storytelling and very likeable characters. Its 40-minute episodes are filled with fast-paced action, mystery, sci-fi, comedy, and more reflective moments that deal with issues of purpose, tolerance, and self-acceptance. “Volume One: Genesis” is far more interesting and consistent than the rest of the show, so if you don’t have the time to commit to all of it, those first 16 hours are a good way to see if it’s for you. It should also be enough to educate you on the returning characters of Heroes Reborn, premiering September on NBC.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Netflix, and Vudu.

Commitment: 55 hours.


The Knick: Season 1 (2014) 87%

What it is: A brilliant surgeon (Clive Owen) struggles to uphold the reputation of the famed Knickerbocker Hospital during the early 1900s while battling a narcotics addiction and, after a prominent black surgeon (Andre Holland) is hired, his own prevailing notions of race.

Why you should watch it: Unflinchingly graphic with a keen eye for period-specific detail, The Knick transports viewers to a time when a hospital visit was often something to be feared. Performances across the board are top-notch, and with Steven Soderbergh behind the camera, the series sports a crisp, finely tuned aesthetic. With season one hitting DVD and Blu-ray on August 11, you’ll have plenty of time to consume all ten episodes before season two premieres this fall.

Where to watch: All of season one is currently available to Cinemax subscribers on MaxGo, and you can also pick it up on home video August 11.

Commitment: 8.5 hours.


American Crime: Season 1 (2015) 94%

What it is: A dramatic anthology series, portraying a single murder and the pain and change it inflicts upon those affected.

Why you should watch it: 2015 Emmy nominees Felicity Huffman, Timothy Hutton, Richard Cabral, and Regina King lend themselves to a provocative drama that is more entangled around the lives of those touched by the crime than the mystery behind it. The series is also nominated in the Outstanding Limited Series and Outstanding Writing categories. This is a show that never lets up as an intense, expertly played character drama.

Where to watch: Amazon, Hulu, iTunes, and Vudu.

Commitment: 8 hours.


The Leftovers: Season 1 (2014) 82%

What it is: Set three years after two percent of the population mysteriously disappears, The Leftovers looks at the aftermath as it effects the residents of the small town of Mapleton, NY.

Why you should watch it: For those viewers of who loved the mystery of Lost, co-creator Damon Lindelof again brings a large group of people together whose connections are slowly revealed, even if the overarching mystery remains clouded. The show features a breakout performance from Carrie Coon (Gone Girl), as well as a stand-up cast including Amy Brenneman, Christopher Eccleston, Liv Tyler, Ann Dowd, and Justin Theroux (who cries a lot, and who doesn’t love a healthy dose of man tears?). Added to the mix is Max Richter’s haunting score, which takes the melodrama and ramps it up to eleven.

Where to watch: Amazon Prime, Google Play, HBO Go, and Vudu.

Commitment: 10 hours.


Doctor Who: Season 8 (2014) 88%

What it is: The series chronicles the adventures of the “Doctor,” an alien called a Time Lord, a race that looks just like humans (though the Doctor says it’s the other way around). The Doctor uses a vehicle called the TARDIS, short for Time and Relative Dimension in Space, that looks like a 1960s-era London police box — although it’s much bigger on the inside. Nearly all of the Time Lords were destroyed in the Great Time War, so the Doctor is the only one that he knows of, and he has basically appointed himself humanity’s protector.

Why you should watch it: With the latest regeneration of the Doctor (Peter Capaldi), you get a semi-reset that allows new viewers to jump into the action. Capaldi has been praised for his rendition of the 12th Doctor, and with the new season set to debut on September 19 on BBC America, now is the perfect time to get caught up.

Where to watch: Season eight is available on Amazon PrimeiTunesVudu, and will arrive on Netflix on August 8.

Commitment: Time is wibbly-wobbly, but about 12 hours.


Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 1 (2000) 89%

What it is: Seinfeld creator Larry David plays a fictional version of himself as a producer, writer, and all-around difficult guy living in Los Angeles.

Why you should watch it: Through the lens of Larry David’s hyper-observant, wholly unsentimental, and utterly hilarious point of view, Curb Your Enthusiasm shines a light on the mundane details of life that drive all of us crazy — even if David is the only one who speaks up about them. With an ensemble that features Cheryl Hines, Richard Lewis, Jeff Garlin, and Susie Essman, Curb will have you at once identifying with the characters and also cringing at their actions.

Where to watch: All eight seasons hit Amazon Prime on August 6, and are also available on Google Play, HBO GoiTunes, and Vudu.

Commitment: 40 hours.


Once Upon a Time: Season 1 (2011) 81%

What it is: A fantastical exploration of the lives of fairy tale heroes and villains as they weave in and out of a contemporary life parallel to our own. Snow White, the Evil Queen, Rumplestiltskin, Captain Hook, Prince Charming, Pinocchio, Peter Pan, Robin Hood, the Snow Queen, Ursula, the Wicked Witch, Cruella De Vil, and the Dwarves all live in this world, discovering truths and lies while struggling with the battles of good and evil.

Why you should watch it: While it sometimes cannot help but feel like a commercial for Disney films, the themes suggest there is still magic in the small Maine town of Storybrooke, the home of many of the fairy tale characters we grew up with. Melodrama entwines their lives as much, if not more, than the magic of the lore, as they venture back and forth between contemporary Storybrooke and the timeless Enchanted Forest. The stories are spawned from the famous children’s stories, but the plots cater to adult themes as well, and is popcorn fun for all.

Where to watch: Amazon, iTunes, Netflix, and Vudu.

Commitment: 66 hours.


Vicious: Season 1 (2014) 80%

What it is: A hilarious PBS UK import starring Sir Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi as a bitter, senior couple in a long-term relationship.

Why you should watch it: Two reasons: Sir Ian McKellan and Derek Jacobi. And if you need more motivation than that, add in some Frances De La Tour, who is consistently hysterical as the homely, single, best friend. Vicious is a bit of a throwback to the classic English sitcom, but with such immensely experienced talent aboard, you will find yourself laughing at each rude insult hurled at each cast member throughout every episode.

Where to watch: There is only one season to catch up on before the next, and it’s available on Amazon Instant Video, iTunesPBS , Vudu and Xfinity. Season two premieres Aug. 23 on PBS at 10:30 p.m.

Commitment: 3.5 hours.


You're the Worst: Season 1 (2014) 82%

What it is: Set in Los Angeles, the show follows narcissistic writer Jimmy (Chris Geereand cynical PR exec Gretchen (Aya Cashas they meet at a mutual friend’s wedding and attempt to have a relationship.

Why you should watch it: It’s the pitch black romantic comedy we always wanted, featuring the kind of twenty-something Los Angelenos the rest of the country loves to hate. While Jimmy and Gretchen are a hoot, it’s the supporting cast that really make You’re The Worst shine. Jimmy’s PTSD-suffering roommate Edgar (Desmin Borges) keeps everyone from being completely insufferable and Gretchen’s BFF Lindsay (Kether Donahue) airy (if sometimes dimwitted) take on life keeps the show from drowning in cynicism.

Where to watch: Amazon Prime, Google Play, iTunes, and Vudu.

Commitment: 4 hours.


The Last Man on Earth: Season 1 (2015) 84%

What it is: After touring the country in an RV in search of others like him, a Tucson, Arizonaman (SNL alum Will Forte) who believes himself to be the only human survivor of an apocalyptic plague returns home, only to find that he may not be so alone after all.

Why you should watch it: Long known for his bizarre sketches and boneheaded characterson Saturday Night Live, Forte has succeeded in realizing — and maintaining — a novel idea and a central character blessed with a peculiar, desperate energy. The apocalyptic premise is rich with comic potential, which Forte and his talented cast mates harness frequently and effectively, and there are enough surprises along the way to keep you guessing. Since it comes back in September with season two, it’s a perfect time to catch up.

Where to watch: Amazon, iTunes, and Vudu.

Commitment: 4.5 hours.

See a sneak peek clip from the upcoming Doctor Who Christmas special.

The new Doctor Who Christmas special will air on Christmas day. Will you be watching?

 

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