This week at the movies, we’ve got a quartet of superheroes (Fantastic Four, starring Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan); runaway livestock (the stop-motion animated feature Shaun the Sheep); a veteran rocker (Ricki and the Flash, starring Meryl Streep and Mamie Gummer); and a creepy acquaintance (The Gift, starring Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall). What do the critics have to say?


Fantastic Four (2015) 9%

Pity the poor Fantastic Four. Marvel’s original superhero team has never been particularly well served on the big screen, and critics say that trend continues with Fantastic Four, a jumbled attempt to reboot the franchise that boasts talented actors stranded in an oddly morose, badly paced misfire. It’s yet another origin story: Reed Richards (Miles Teller) and his pals figure out how to teleport to another dimension, but after an ill-fated trip they all end up with superpowers — and make an enemy of the evil Dr. Doom. The pundits say that Fantastic Four has a few interesting ideas that are quickly pushed aside in favor of overripe dialogue, endless exposition, and so-so special effects.


Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015) 99%

The cheeky Brits over at Aardman Animations — the folks who brought you Wallace & Gromit and Chicken Run — are masters of the witty, whimsical stop-motion comedy. However, critics say they may have topped themselves with Shaun the Sheep, an astonishing achievement that blends Chaplinesque silent-movie  slapstick with a surfeit of hilarious visual gags. Shaun the Sheep encourages the rest of his flock to take a day off, which eventually leads to the disappearance of their owner into the big city. The sheep attempt to recover the farmer, and hilarity ensues. The pundits say the Certified Fresh Shaun the Sheep is truly inspired in its comic lunacy, and while some of the jokes might fly over the heads of the youngest viewers, it’s sure to enchant the whole family.


Ricki and the Flash (2015) 65%

Meryl Streep classes up everything she touches, so it’s a little surprising to see her play a down-and-dirty rocker in Ricki and the Flash. But critics say the film has a few more tricks up its sleeve — despite its shopworn premise, Ricki and the Flash offers enough great acting and toe tapping tunes to be a little more than just the same old song. Streep stars as a singer who ditched her family to chase musical stardom. But with her estranged daughter in the midst of a personal crisis, Ricki heads home in an attempt to heal old wounds. The pundits say Ricki and the Flash isn’t earth-shaking, but it’s energetic and raggedy enough to make its formulaic elements feel fresh.


The Gift (2015) 91%

If you’ve seen Warrior or The Great Gatsby, you know Joel Edgerton has a commanding screen presence. And critics say that if the chilling, intelligent thriller The Gift is any indication, he’s got a promising future behind the camera as well. Well-to-do Simon (Jason Bateman) has a seemingly chance encounter with Gordo (Edgerton), an old high school classmate. But Gordo starts showing up everywhere Simon goes, and leaving odd gifts at his house; is there something in their pasts that prompted such behavior? The pundits say The Gift is a deeply unnerving psychological drama that sustains its tension from beginning to end.


What’s Hot On TV:

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Strike Back‘s final season promises a big finish fueled by compelling characters and sensational video game-style action.


Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp: First Day of Camp (2015) 93%

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp offers more of the the goofy hijinks that fans of the cult classic crave, but outsiders might not be quite as enamored.


Also Opening This Week In Limited Release

  • Two Step (2014) , a noirish thriller about a down-on-his-luck man who gets ensnared by a con artist, is at 100 percent.
  • Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection F (2015)the latest installment of the venerable anime franchise, is at 100 percent.
  • The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) , starring Bel Powley and Kristen Wiig in a coming-of-age drama about a promising young artist with a growing drug problem and a host of family issues, is at 92 percent.
  • Call Me Lucky (2015) , a documentary portrait of standup comic-turned-activist Barry Crimmins, is at 80 percent.
  • The Falling (2014) , a drama about a mysterious fainting epidemic at an all-girls boarding school in Britain, is at 80 percent.
  • Cop Car (2015) , starring Kevin Bacon and Shea Whigham in a thriller about a pair of teenagers who face dire consequences after taking a police car for a joyride, is at 78 percent.
  • Kahlil Gibran's The Prophet (2014) , an omnibus animated film that dramatizes the poems from the bestselling spiritual text, is at 67 percent.
  • Sneakerheadz (2015) , a documentary about obsessive athletic shoe collectors, is at 60 percent.
  • Dark Places (2015) , starring Charlize Theron and Nicholas Hoult in a thriller about a woman still suffering deep emotional scars from the murder of her family years before, is at 33 percent.
  • The Runner (2015) , starring Nicolas Cage and Connie Nielsen in a drama about a politician whose attempts to deal witht the BP oil spill are stymied by scandal, is at 31 percent.

New this week to streaming video, we have new original series from Hulu and Netflix, an Academy Awards’ Best Picture winner, a handful of Criterion movies from 1966, and plenty of Certified Fresh choices. Read on for details:


Available for purchase:

 

Man From Reno (2014) 95%

Set in an especially ominous San Francisco, this thriller follows a mystery writer who stumbles into a strange missing persons case.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


Wyrmwood (2014) 82%

Zombies ravage the Australian Outback in this gory action flick, which pays homage Mad Max and other Oz-sploitation classics.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes


The Dead Lands (2014) 70%

This adventure film tells the tale of a Maori warrior who seeks to avenge his father’s murder and stave off an attack from a rival tribe.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


New on Hulu:

 

Difficult People: Season 1 (2015) 88%

Misanthropic standup comedians and BFFs hang out and make fun of their fellow New Yorkers in this Hulu original series. Series premiere on August 5th.

Available now on: Hulu


New on Netflix:

 

The Hurt Locker (2008) 97%

Kathryn Bigelow’s Certified Fresh, Best Picture-winning Iraq War drama tells the tale of  three explosives experts charged with disarming and disposing of the homemade bombs.

Available now on: Netflix


Three Kings (1999) 94%

David O. Russell Gulf War heist picture follows a trio of U.S. Army Reservists (George Clooney, Ice Cube, and Mark Wahlberg) who find a map that leads them to a stash of plundered Kuwaiti gold.

Available now on: Netflix


Lassie (2005) 93%

Peter O’Toole, Samantha Morton, and Peter Dinklage star in this Certified Fresh family adventure about a collie who undertakes an epic journey to reunite with her previous owners.

Available now on: Netflix


Casting By (2012) 94%

This documentary offers an inside look at the world of Hollywood casting directors.

Available now on: Netflix


Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp: First Day of Camp (2015) 93%

Elizabeth Banks, Michael Ian Black, Bradley Cooper, Amy Poehler, Paul Rudd, and many more team up for this prequel/reboot of the 2001 cult comedy about a summer camp in Maine.

Available now on: Netflix


The Way (2010) 83%

Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen in this Certified Fresh dramedy about a man who treks across France in tribute to his late son.

Available now on: Netflix


Von Ryan's Express (1965) 90%

Frank Sinatra and Trevor Howard team up to liberate a group of British soldiers from a German POW camp in this action-packed World War II thriller.

Available now on: Netflix


The Skeleton Twins (2014) 86%

Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader star in this Certified Fresh dramedy about estranged twins who reunite as both are in the midst of personal problems.

Available now on: Netflix


Dear Frankie (2004) 81%

Gerard Butler stars as an anonymous seaman who agrees to help a single mother (Emily Mortimer) preserve the long-running lie that her son’s father is a sailor on a ship that just happens to be docking in town.

Available now on: Netflix


Marvin's Room (1996) 84%

Meryl Streep, Diane Keaton, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Robert De Niro star in this Certified Fresh drama about estranged sisters who try to mend fences whell illness strikes their loved ones.

Available now on: Netflix


Katy Perry: Part of Me (2012) 76%

The film follows Perry on her “California Dreams” world tour, capturing her eye-popping stage show as well as archival footage of her younger days and glimpses of backstage drama.

Available now on: Netflix


Top Secret! (1984) 75%

How silly can you get? Val Kilmer is Nick Rivers, a vapid American rock star on a goodwill tour of the Soviet bloc in Zucker-Abraham-Zucker’s classic spoof of spy movies and Elvis musicals.

Available now on: Netflix


Quills (2000) 75%

Geoffrey Rush, Kate Winslet, Michael Caine, and Joaquin Phoenix star in this biopic about the Marquis de Sade.

Available now on: Netflix


Fletch (1985) 77%

This comic murder mystery still stands as one of the best big-screen vehicles for Chevy Chase’s brand of smug silliness.

Available now on: Netflix


My Best Friend's Wedding (1997) 73%

In this romantic comedy, Dermot Mulroney is caught in the middle of a romantic tug-of-war between his longtime restaurant critic pal (Julia Roberts) and his 20-year-old fiancee (Cameron Diaz).

Available now on: Netflix


Starship Troopers (1997) 66%

Paul Verhoeven directed this cult favorite, a slyly satirical sci-fi action flick about an alien insect invasion.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Fandor:

 

Balthazar (1966) 100%

Robert Bresson’s masterpiece is a devastating look at man’s inhumaity to man, as witnessed by an oft-mistreated donkey.

Available now on: Fandor


Closely Watched Trains (1966) 100%

This coming-of-age drama about a lovelorn station guard classic of the Czech New Wave.

Available now on: Fandor


Violence at Noon (1966) 100%

Nagisa Oshima tells the story of a murderer and rapist — and the people affected by his crimes — in this disturbing, formally inventive classic.

Available now on: Fandor


The Battle of Algiers (1966) 99%

This riveting look at the French occupation of Algeria recreates the tumultuous late-1950s-early-1960s conflict so remarkably that you won’t believe it isn’t a contemporary newscast.

Available now on: Fandor


Masculine-Feminine (1966) 96%

Jean-Pierre Léaud and Chantal Goya star in Jean-Luc Godard’s French New Wave classic, whic is stuffed with ideas about politics, pop culture, and the battle of the sexes.

Available now on: Fandor


Persona (1966) 91%

Ingmar Bergman’s haunting, hypnotic Persona explores the fluidity of human existence. Liv Ullman plays Elizabeth, an actress who has suffered an onstage breakdown; she refuses to speak, and is cared for by Alma (Bibi Andersson).

Available now on: Fandor

This week at the movies, we’ve got spies under siege (Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation, starring Tom Cruise and Rebecca Ferguson) and hapless road-trippers (Vacation, starring Ed Helms and Christina Applegate). What do the critics have to say?


Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (2015) 94%

The recipe for a Mission: Impossible movie: take a bunch of interesting actors, add the latest in futuristic technology, throw in a death-defying Tom Cruise stunt or two, and voila! If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, and critics say Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation is terrific popcorn entertainment that benefits immeasurably from energetic performances by Cruise and relative newcomer Rebecca Ferguson. The plot is the same as usual: the IMF is on the run from both the government and a shadowy band of bad guys. But the pundits say it’s that adherence to formula that helps to make the Certified Fresh Rogue Nation such a triumph — this is assured blockbuster filmmaking at its slickest and most pleasurable.


Vacation (2015) 28%

Few would claim that National Lampoon’s Vacation is a deathless cinematic masterpiece, but its deft balance of warmth and sustained zaniness have made it a perennial favorite. Critics say Vacation is unlikely to engender such fondness: a game cast keeps things watchable, but the film’s labored gags are often more cringe-inducing than funny.  Ed Helms is the latest actor to portray Rusty Griswold, and the plot is basically the same as the original: the family hits the road for Walley World, and is met with wacky characters and bizarre humiliations along the way. The pundits say Vacation is good for a dumb chuckle or two, but it’s sour where the original was sweet.


What’s Hot On TV:

I Am Cait: Season 1 (2015) 86%

I Am Cait aims for insight rather than exploitation, treating its subject with a respect that sets it apart from other reality programming.


Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp: First Day of Camp (2015) 93%

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp offers more of the the goofy hijinks that fans of the cult classic crave, but outsiders might not be quite as enamored.


Also Opening This Week In Limited Release

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, Netflix’s reboot of the titular 2001 cult film, is upon us. And before you binge your way through Camp Firewood this weekend, check out the Rotten Tomatoes primer on everything you need to know about season one.

 


WHAT’S THE SET-UP?

Welcome to Camp Firewood, 1981. For those familiar with the film, it’s the same Maine summer camp where Wet Hot American Summer is set — but, while the movie took place over the last day of camp, the new TV version starts on the first day of camp. In other words, this is a prequel set two months prior (even though the cast is 15 years older). The entire season is a continuing storyline transpiring over a single day, with episodes that should be seen in order, preferably binge-watched like a long movie.


WHO’S BACK FROM THE ORIGINAL CAST?

Pretty much everybody you remember from the original movie shows up for the TV series. Molly Shannon is back as crafts teacher Gail von Kleinenstein, as is her love interest, Gene (Christopher Meloni), the disturbed Vietnam vet-turned-camp chef. Janeane Garofalo returns as Beth (on her way to becoming camp director) and her soon-to-be love interest, Professor Henry Newman (David Hyde Pierce). The camp counselors are also in full attendance: Andy (Paul Rudd), Gerald “Coop” Cooperberg (Showalter), J.J. (Zak Orth), Victor Pulak (Ken Marino), Neil (Joe Lo Truglio), McKinley Dozen (Michael Ian Black), Katie (Marguerite Moreau), Ben (Bradley Cooper), Susie (Amy Poehler), Lindsay (Elizabeth Banks), Ron Von Kleinenstein (Judah Friedlander), and Can of Vegetables (H. Jon Benjamin).


WHO’S NEW IN THE CAST?

If your mind hasn’t exploded yet from the roster of stars who made it back to Camp Firewood, it might when you see the talent who was added to the First Day of Camp. Without spoiling too much, we can tell you that Mad Men alumns Jon Hamm and John Slattery show up, as well as Jason Schwartzman (Rushmore), Lake Bell (In a World), Rob Huebel (Transparent), Jordan Peele (Key & Peele), Paul Scheer (The League) , Josh Charles (The Good Wife), ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic (UHF), Chris Pine (Star Trek), Michaela Watkins (Enough Said), and Kristen Wiig (Bridesmaids).


WHY A TV SHOW AND NOT ANOTHER MOVIE?

“Part of what happened with us is we realized we had more story that we wanted to tell than what we could fit into a 90-minute vessel,” Wain told reporters at a Netflix press day in April. “So we just kept thinking about it and realized that the platform, and the medium, and the audience, and the creative space of Netflix was perfect. That had just emerged at around the time that we were thinking about this, and so it was a perfect convergence.”


DO YOU HAVE TO KNOW THE MOVIE TO GET THE SHOW?

Watching the film (which is currently streaming on Netflix) is not a prerequisite for enjoying the show — though it would augment the experience. “If you’re a fan of the movie, or you know it well, then there’s a whole layer of many, many, many little and big ways that things get set up, or precursors to elements of the movie, that we tried to make clever, funny, [with] fun reveals and so on,” Wain teased. Also, since the TV show is a prequel, the events from the movie haven’t happened yet.


WHY HAVE ACTORS WHO ARE SO MUCH OLDER THAN THEIR CHARACTERS?

“After a few minutes you’re not even thinking about how old they are. You’re just watching this story of these teenagers and laughing,” Wain explained. It was always part of the bit that the actors were too old for their characters in the film, but, of course, 15 years later, the age difference is even more apparent — and more funny. “I do think it gives you an opportunity to see it in a way that you wouldn’t,” Showalter said about the age of the cast. “There is an element of satire to it that you wouldn’t get if you had actual teenagers playing these characters.”


HAS THE HUMOR CHANGED AFTER 15 YEARS?

Janeane-Garofalo-700x3801

If you’re a fan of the film Wet Hot American Summer, you can expect much of the same silliness and meta-comedy from the new TV show. But, while the movie showed camp counselors on a heroin bender, you might not see as much shock humor in this version. “In [the TV show] Stella, and even a little bit in Wet Hot, there was an element of trying to be outrageous — potentially offensive,” Showalter said. “That’s less interesting to me right now — that particular kind of throw-caution-to-the-wind. I’m more interested in a certain kind of fun. I want people to feel good.”


WILL THERE BE A SEASON TWO?

There’s no word yet on whether or not there will be a season two, but WHAS creators Showalter and Wain seem open to it. Wrangling the talent for the TV reunion was strangely easier than expected. “We just basically set a date and said, “Okay, whenever anyone’s free during that time, come on over and we’ll shoot,” Wain said. “So, that was never the delay. It was just sort of getting the whole machine up and running. But, yeah, I think there’s plenty more to do if it all works out. It would be great.”

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp premieres this Friday on Netflix. Read reviews here.

Michael-Showalter-and-David-Wain-700x3802

In 2001, David Wain and Michael Showalter gave us the film Wet Hot American Summer, a send-up of teen sex comedies from the late 1970s and early 1980s like Meatballs and Porkys, set against the absurdly high stakes of the final day at a Maine sleep-away camp. In the years that followed, Wet Hot American Summer became a cult favorite, in large part because its roster of talent, which included Amy Poehler, Paul Rudd, Elizabeth Banks, and Bradley Cooper, would go on to become big stars. After years of rumors that WHAS would have some form of a reunion, Netflix announced in January that the property would indeed be back as an original series this summer.

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, which premieres as a complete season this Friday on Netflix, is a prequel that takes place just weeks before the movie — only now, the actors (who were too old to play their characters in 2001) are 15 years older. Rotten Tomatoes talked with creators Wain and Showalter about how they were able to pull off this feat of getting the gang back together (some of it slightly exaggerated), all the while remaining true to their vision of Camp Firewood.

Sarah Ricard for Rotten Tomatoes: I remember in the movie Wet Hot American Summer where you say something like, “We could meet again in 10 years” — and that’s not what you do in your TV show.

Michael Showalter: You’d think that we would.

David Wain: Actually, at the end of the movie though, we do show them meeting 10 years later, where we give a little taste of it. Who knows? Maybe we’ll show all of that at some point in the future, but this one takes place two months earlier, on the first day of the same summer.

Rotten Tomatoes: Okay, so where do we find the characters instead?

Showalter: We find the characters in all different places.

Wain: For example, Janeane Garofalo, Beth’s character, is not the director of the camp yet. She is the head counselor along with Jason Schwartzman, his character Greg. Then we find out what happens.

Showalter: Some of them are brand new; some of them are returning. A lot of them are already friends.

Wain: It’s a real origin story of how the events on the last day of camp came to be.

Showalter: Precisely.

Janeane-Garofalo-700x3801

Rotten Tomatoes: Has the tone changed since the movie?

Showalter: I don’t think so. I mean, I think it might be more like a higher ratio of jokes, but very much the sensibility, the kind of silliness, the sentimentality, and the nostalgia is the same.

Wain: The feel of it is even more like the original than I even thought it would be.

Showalter: Actually, this show is more like the original than the original.

Wain: That’s the truth. Get your head around that.

Showalter: The original is somehow hacky now. So, actually, the original movie was very derivative of this show.

Wain: The original pitch though, when we went to financiers back in 1997, trying to start raising money to make the original movie, was, “It’s a two-part thing. We’re going to make a feature film about the last day of camp, and then in 15 years, we’re going to do a streaming show about the first day of camp.” So that’s how we did it.

Showalter: So we said, “You could choose to invest in either one of them.” Some people wanted to do the feature and then Netflix was there and they said, “Look, we don’t exist yet, but when we do, we’d probably be interested in the streaming version.”

Wain: Netflix was worried because they knew that Orange is the New Black was going to be in June and they were like, “Okay, you can do end of July.”

Showalter: And Netflix is a person. Net Flix.

Rotten Tomatoes: As long time collaborators, how has your dynamic changed, if at all?

Wain: I think it’s a variation. In so many ways, it’s amazing how it doesn’t change. We started working together when we were in our teens in college. A lot of what we do is exactly the same thing that we did when we were 18 years old, which is pitch each other ideas and jokes and “I like that,” “No, I don’t like it,” “Let’s debate that,” “What if we did this?” “How about if we cast that person?” — whatever. It’s amazing how, yes, we’ve learned a lot and we’ve changed a lot and we improve things, but the way of working, in so many ways, is the same.

Rotten Tomatoes: Do you have an idea of what makes for good collaborators in a more general sense?

Showalter: Every collaboration is very different. I think you have to figure out how to get to the place where you’re both operating at your maximum. You want to figure out what is the way to maximize the partnership.

Wain: For me, with us, I think — and I would apply it to any other partnerships that I have — is that there’s a basis bedrock trust that we both sort of agree on in general: what’s funny and what works or what we’re doing in this particular project anyway. So that when we are debating about this particular joke or this particular shot, we know that they’re both coming from a place of we know that we’re looking at the same big picture.

Rotten Tomatoes: There are certain partnerships in which both parties are not afraid to show how weird they can be. I think Key and Peele are like that, and I think you guys certainly fit that criteria as well. When you’re willing to have that trust with each other and then share it with everybody, it lands so much better because it’s not watered down.

Showalter: When we were doing this, all the way back when we were doing The State, one of the turning points for all of us comedically — and that’s all the Reno [911] people too, Michael Black, all of us — was, because we were always writing sketches for ourselves, we’d be like, “We think this is hilarious but no one else would think it was funny.” Those were the sketches that, for the first season, weren’t making it into the show. Then as we continued going, we started dipping our toe in those sketches that we think are funny but that we would never show that to anybody. Those ended up becoming the sketches that became who we were. That kind of became our entire philosophy comedically. It was like we’re really just trying to make each other laugh then hope that the audience comes along with us, rather than trying to figure out some analytic of what other people think is funny.

Rotten Tomatoes: That’s almost like the idea behind having a muse, right? You write to one person and somehow it translates to the masses.

Wain: That’s the only way I can imagine doing it than if you’re trying to do it in a more systematized market-tested [way].

Showalter: I’ve said many times that David is my muse.  I’ve been public about that. I’ve gone public about that for years.

Rotten Tomatoes: How did you get all these people together for the show?

Showalter: Before we even started talking to Netflix about doing this show, we had already — and even ourselves working on the material — canvased the whole cast to say, “This is something we’re thinking about doing. Is it something you’d ever want to do?” We kind of went in with, “We want to know that everybody wants to do this. If just a third of the cast wants to do it, then forget it.” We wanted it to be a full reunion.

Wain: The point was to do it and not make it look like, “Oh, who could they get?”

Showalter: Right, so when everyone said they would do it, we were like, “Okay, great. Let’s go do it.”

Wain: But to answer your question more specifically of how did we literally get them all together, we rented this used school bus and essentially —

Showalter: It was really more of a van.

Wain: But a very big van that could carry a lot of people, and we went all over the country, really.

Showalter: There were two of them, on certain big days. There were two of them.

Wain: Because some people were on the east coast and so we went around, and Mike and I would get up very, very early and sometimes he’d drive, sometimes I’d drive.

Showalter: Sometimes before the sun would come up.

Wain: If Mike drives, I’m in the front seat, and then we just go to each person’s house and pick them up and —

Showalter: Tag team.

Wain: “Wake up. Come on” and then we’d get everyone together that way.

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp starts this Friday, Jul. 31, on Netflix.

Check out the star-studded full trailer for Netflix original series Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp from David Wain and Michael Showalter.

 

 

A prequel to the 2001 cult film Wet Hot American Summer starring Amy Poehler, Paul Rudd, Bradley Cooper, Elizabeth Banks, and Michael Ian Black, all of whom are returning, Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp promises to be just as zany as the film, with the added bonus of new cast members Chris Pine, Jon Hamm, Kristen Wiig, and more.

Along with the first full trailer, Netflix has also released this fantastic 80s throwback poster:

 

 

Every episode season one will be available on Netflix on Friday, July 31.

Check out the first trailer of the new Netflix original series Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp from David Wain and Michael Showalter (and someone fix the tracking on that VCR)!

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp is the prequel to the 2001 cult film Wet Hot American Summer, and features an all-star cast, including Amy Poehler, Paul Rudd, Bradley Cooper, Elizabeth Banks, and Michael Ian Black.

Every episode season one will be available on Netflix on Friday, July 31.

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