MAGNUM P.I. is a modern take on the classic series starring Jay Hernandez (pictured) as Thomas Magnum, a decorated former Navy SEAL who, upon returning home from Afghanistan, repurposes his military skills to become a private investigator in Hawaii. MAGNUM P.I. will premiere on the CBS Television Network during the 2018-19 season. Photo: Karen Neal/CBS 2018 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Magnum P.I. (Photo by Karen Neal/CBS)

It’s never too early to start planning your weekly TV viewing. This week the major broadcast networks announce their fall schedule to advertisers in their TV upfronts in New York, giving fans a few things to look forward to when they return from summer vacation.

Get ready for even more reboots, thanks to the success of Will & Grace and (the initial success of)  Roseanne. Shows like Murphy Brown are coming back with the original cast, but we’ll get new versions of Magnum P.I., Charmed, and Roswell (as Roswell, New Mexico now).

Networks are even rescuing each other’s shows from cancellation. After Fox grabbed Last Man Standing from ABC, NBC grabbed Brooklyn Nine-Nine from Fox, scheduling it for midseason.

Here’s a look at the new fall schedules by network, including some cable updates that have accompanied the announcements of their broadcast brethren. We’ll update the schedule throughout the week as networks announce their new and returning shows.

NBC | USA | Fox | FX | ABC | Freeform | CBS | Turner Networks | The CW | Renewals & Cancellations


NBC

Monday

8 p.m.: The Voice --
10 p.m.: Manifest – NEW!


Who: Josh Dallas, Melissa Roxburgh, Jack Messina
What: From Flight and Back to the Future director Robert Zemeckis, a plane survives turbulence in what seems a routine flight of only a few hours, but five years have passed when they land. Could this be another Lost-like mystery obsession?


Tuesday

8 p.m.: The Voice --
9 p.m.: This Is Us 95%
10 p.m.:  New Amsterdam – NEW


Who: Ryan Eggold, Christine Chang, Freema Agyeman, Tyler Labine, Janet Montgomery, Jocko Sims
What: Based on the nation’s oldest public hospital Bellvue, Dr. Max Goodwin (Eggold) comes to New Amsterdam to fix the broken system. Can he call our health insurance too?


Wednesday

8 p.m.: Chicago Med --
9 p.m.: Chicago Fire --
10 p.m.: Chicago P.D. --


Thursday

8 p.m.: Superstore 90%
8:30 p.m.: The Good Place 96%
9 p.m.: Will & Grace --
9:30 p.m.: I Feel Bad – NEW


Who: Sarayu Blue, Paul Adelstein, Johnny Pemberton, Aisling Bea, James Buckley
What: A new comedy from E.P. Amy Poehler, based on Orli Auslander’s book I Feel Bad: All Day. Every Day. About Everything., working mom Emet (Blue) tries to forgive herself for not being perfect to everyone at home or work. Good thing they shortened the title!
10 p.m.: Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 78%


Friday

8 p.m.: Blindspot --
9 p.m.: Midnight, Texas --
10 p.m.: Dateline NBC --


Saturday

8 p.m.: Dateline NBC --
10 p.m: Saturday Night Live --
11:30 p.m.: Saturday Night Live --


Sunday

7 p.m.: Football Night in America
8:20 p.m.: Sunday Night Football


Midseason

The Blacklist --

Ellen’s Game of Games

The Enemy Within – NEW!

Who: Jennifer Carpenter, Morris Chestnut
What: Erica Shepherd (Carpenter) is in SuperMax for being a CIA traitor. Now FBI Agent Will Keaton (Chestnut) needs her to help catch the criminal Shepherd knows well. Reverse Blacklist maybe?

The InBetween – NEW!

Who: Harriet Dyer
What: Cassie Bishop (Dyer) is a medium. No a ghost whisperer. No, well, she can see and speak to the dead so she helps the police solve cases.

The Village – NEW!

Who: Lorraine Toussaint, Grace Van Dien, Luke Slattery, Amber Skye Noyes, Ethan Maher, Darren Kagasoff, Frankie Faison, Warren Christie, Will Chase
What: Not M. Night Shyamalan’s village. Just a heartwarming ensemble drama about a group of neighbors in a Brooklyn apartment building. Or is it? (Yes, it is.)

Abby’s – NEW!

Who: Natalie Morales, Neil Flynn
What: Abby (Morales) runs a bar in her backyard, so the show will be taped outdoors in front of an audience. Could this be the new place where everybody knows your name?

America’s Got Talent: The Champions – NEW!
Who: Simon Cowell, past AGT winners
What: The winners of previous America’s Got Talent compete to become AGT champion. It’s the battle of the all stars!

50th Anniversary of the Elvis Comeback Special
Who: Nashville superstars
What: Country sensations recreate Elvis Presley’s legendary 1968 comeback special.

The Titan Games – NEW!

Who: Dwayne Johnson
What: The Rock leads six contestants to best six Titans in athletic competitions. If they win, they face next week’s contestants.

The Awesome Show
Who: Chris Hardwick
What: Hardwick hosts and produces with Mark Burnett this showcase for scientific and technological advances.

Abba: Thank You For The Music
Who: Abba
What: All star musicians pay tribute to Abba in this two hour special, and Abba will debut their first new music in 30 years!

NBC | USA | Fox | FX | ABC | Freeform | CBS | Turner Networks | The CW | Renewals & Cancellations

24: Legacy: Jimmy Smits (Mathieu Young/FOX)

On any given day of Fox’s original series 24, the president or a presidential candidate needed Jack Bauer’s help. So what are they going to do now that Jack isn’t around?

They’ll just have to count on the new guy, Eric Carter (Corey Hawkins) this time. After the Super Bowl, Fox launches a brand new day with 24: Legacy.

The series includes Jimmy Smits as John Donovan, a new candidate for president. Donovan happens to be married to former CTU Head Rebecca Ingram (Miranda Otto). His day gets complicated when Rebecca returns to CTU to help Carter evade killers who rooted out him and his Ranger team from hiding. Donovan’s campaign manager, Nilaa (Sheila Vand), has strong opinions about Rebecca, and within the first hour, Donovan warns Nilaa she’s overstepping when she talks smack about his wife. Gerald McRaney appears as Henry Donovan, the candidate’s father.

Smits spoke with Rotten Tomatoes recently about his role in the new series and about returning to the role of Bail Organa for 2016 blockbuster Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, which so successfully provided connective tissue between the Star Wars prequels and the original trilogy.

The Emmy– and Golden Globe–winning actor also talked about his role in The Get Down as Papa Fuerte, who supports  the musical ambitions of his niece Mylene (Herizen Guardiola). The Get Down returns to Netflix this year.


24: LEGACY: L-R: Guest star Gerald McRaney and Jimmy Smits in the "1:00 PM – 2:00 PM” episode of 24: LEGACY airing Monday, Feb. 6 (8:00-9:01 PM ET/PT), on FOX. ©2017 Fox Broadcasting Co. Cr: Guy D'Alema/FOX

Fred Topel for Rotten Tomatoes: What is Henry Donovan like?

Jimmy Smits: Well, the relationship is going to be very complicated, which is what I love. What happens is that you start finding out that his love for his son — the older Donovan — his love for his son has possibly made him complicit in the events that have transpired in the first hour.

RT: He might be behind the attack on the Rangers?

Smits: We’ll see how complicit he is, but fingers start pointing towards him. The campaign starts going south a little bit. It hasn’t come out like that, but at one point we’re not sure.

RT: Is Henry Donovan directly involved in the presidential campaign?

Smits: He’s involved by the fact that he’s somebody of great wealth that has a lot of international connections because of his background in oil. And he’s been very active in trying to prop his son up to make this move.

RT: Was Henry Donovan a military man?

Smits: No, we haven’t been talking about that in terms of the backstory.

RT: Was Henry Donovan in politics himself?

Smits: No, he’s more an industrialist. We wanted that kind of Big Daddy relationship, you know, Tennessee Williams.


RT: Running for president is a big deal. John Donovan has accomplished a lot. Does he still have issues with his father?

Smits: Absolutely. There are many daddy issues because his dad’s very set in his ways in terms of the way he would like to see things done, to try to use his connections and his financial support to prop up the campaign.

RT: What issues is Donovan running on?

Smits: The show hasn’t been political in designating if he’s a Republican or Democrat or if he’s pro-life. That hasn’t come into being right now because what jump-starts the show is this terrorist attack. You start finding out that the politics in terms of gathering of information, his political bent is a lot different than his wife.

RT: Do we know Donovan’s opponent?

Smits: No, but you’ll find out. His name is Gage.


24: LEGACY: Jimmy Smits ( John P Fleenor/FOX)

RT: How has the pace of 24 been different from other shows you’ve worked on?

Smits: It’s been a little frenetic, but good. It’s kind of nice to be away in Atlanta a little bit, because we’re away from the bubble here. It keeps us focused in a different kind of way. I almost feel like sometimes when I’m on location, you miss your home and your family and all that stuff, but it keeps you focused on the work.

RT: Do you have to get your dialogue exactly right so that all the other storylines still make sense?

Smits: I worked on a show called West Wing before. I didn’t work with Aaron Sorkin, but he created the show and set the tenor of the show, which was you follow the words of the script perfectly, because there’s a dramaturgical thing behind it. That was the way that show operated: Speed was very much a part of the dynamic of working on that set every day.

The dynamic here is different because the genre’s a little bit different. You have this action component that West Wing didn’t have. West Wing was a show about politics. This is a show about geopolitical situations. I don’t want to say that they’re more lenient, because I’m an actor who was trained in the theater, so the script is the bible to me. So I try to be as exact as possible, but I want to try to illuminate the characters and what the author’s intentions are, so sometimes I’m not as exact just to help to clarify.


Jimmy Smits in ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY (Disney)

RT: There were reshoots to Rogue One. Did you do any different versions of your scenes, like when you say, “I trust her with my life?”

Smits: No. That was one of the reasons why I did it, because that little scene there meant a lot to me. I’m so happy that the film has done well, because it meant a lot, I think, to the franchise to do this whole thing that the standalone films would be just as substantive and good as the others, so that they can have a life themselves.


The Get Down (Courtesy of Netflix)

RT: Will you be back on The Get Down?

Smits: The Get Down is going to show its second half that’s already shot. Baz [Luhrmann] is talking now to different directors because he wants to shepherd it more than be active every day directing.

RT: What’s coming up for Papa Fuerte?

Smits: His love for his niece knows no bounds. That, plus the political situation that’s going on New York, he’s going to go down.

RT: Do you get to play the fall from the top?

Smits: Oh, there’s a fall. I don’t know if it’s from the top, but his top.

RT: If Mylene gets discovered, is he instrumental in that?

Smits: He’s involved. He’s another one who wants to put his hand into everything, but you start finding out that the family situation is much different than it was shown in the beginning of the first episodes.

RT: Does the second half take us into 1978 or beyond?

Smits: Yeah, we make a time jump, and I’m not sure what the next year is. Disco is on its downswing, which starts affect what happens with Mylene.

24: Legacy premieres Sunday, February 5 after the Super Bowl on Fox. Be sure to also read our interviews with Hawkins and the cast of 24: Legacy.


Since earning his career breakout with Good Will Hunting in 1997, Matt Damon has won an Academy Award, worked for some of the finest directors (and alongside some of the most talented actors) in Hollywood, and proved his mettle as a dramatic actor, gifted screen comic, and steely action hero. In honor of his latest starring role, in Jason Bourne this weekend, we decided to rifle through the Damon filmography and take a closer look at the ten most critically successful entries. Which of your favorites made the cut? Which ones have the critics blasphemously overlooked? There’s only one way to find out!


 The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999) 84%

As conceived by author Patricia Highsmith, Tom Ripley is a deeply unsavory character — a psychopath who uses his natural charm and malfunctioning moral compass as the gateway into a lavish lifestyle built on lies, theft, and murder. Not the kind of role you’d expect to go to a wholesome-looking fellow like Matt Damon, in other words — but that’s part of what made Damon’s performance in Anthony Minghella’s The Talented Mr. Ripley so profoundly disquieting. Capable of communicating bottomless need, desperate rage, and cold calculation in a single scene, Damon proved his range was far greater than many may have suspected. “We all knew Damon was a fine actor after Good Will Hunting,” wrote Jeffrey Westhoff of the Northwest Herald, “but The Talented Mr. Ripley takes him much further much faster than anyone could have expected.”

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Contagion (2011) 85%

Chilly and sleek, Contagion found director Steven Soderbergh working with frequent screenwriter Scott Z. Burns (The Informant!, Side Effects) to give audiences a scary-as-hell glimpse of just how quickly a global pandemic could spread in the modern world — and employing an impressive group of famous faces to portray it, including Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Laurence Fishburne, Kate Winslet, Jude Law, Elliott Gould, and Bryan Cranston, among others. While Contagion’s pulpy premise and gaudy cast might have suggested something along the lines of a ‘70s disaster flick, the end result was far more serious — and far more disturbing. “Soderbergh keeps a cool head throughout, refraining from the tear-jerking storylines and cheesy emoting you typically get in disaster movies,” wrote Jason Best for Movie Talk. “You might not be groping for tissues, but you’ll definitely be reaching for the anti-viral gel by the close.”

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Courage Under Fire (1996) 86%

Think you’re committed to your job? Try being Matt Damon in preparation for Courage Under Fire. For his role as Specialist Ilario, Damon dropped 40 pounds, adopting a grueling training regimen that had him running miles a day and subsisting on a diet consisting of little more than cigarettes and coffee. It was not, as you might imagine, a decision popular with Damon’s doctors — or, more importantly, his body, which required no small amount of medical repair after shooting ended. But all’s well that ends well, and Edward Zwick’s Rashomon-style Gulf War drama helped Damon break the dry spell he’d been suffering since nabbing a role in 1993’s Geronimo: An American Legend. Oh, and the critics liked it too — like Steve Rhodes, who called it “An extremely moving picture that left me with my heart racing and my arms clutching myself and staring at the screen.”

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The Departed (2006) 90%

Violent, bleak, and unbearably tense, The Departed earned director Martin Scorsese his long-overdue Best Director Oscar — but before that, it delighted critics and filmgoers by using Andrew Lau and Alan Mak’s Infernal Affairs as the launchpad for an unflinching look at the personal toll exacted by the mortal struggle between law enforcement and organized crime. As dirty cop Colin Sullivan, Damon gives one of his subtlest and most heartbreaking performances, portraying a man who knows he’s living one step away from prison — or worse — and who you can’t help but feel for even as he works to ferret out the identity of Mafia mole and honest cop Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio). Though some critics compared The Departed unfavorably to Infernal Affairs, most agreed with the Academy voters who named it the year’s Best Picture; in the words of Beyond Hollywood’s Brian Holcomb, “Scorsese has made an incredible cover version of the original, imbued with every ounce of his artistic personality transforming it into something both familiar and new.”

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Saving Private Ryan (1998) 94%

Steven Spielberg’s long-standing fascination with World War II found its most realistic and hard-hitting expression with Saving Private Ryan. Arriving alongside Tom Brokaw’s well-received book The Greatest Generation, the film followed the fictional (but inspired by real events) tale of a platoon gutting its way through France in order to find a soldier whose three brothers have just been killed in combat (Private Ryan, played in a small but pivotal role by Matt Damon). Anchored by another strong performance from Tom Hanks, studded with talented actors, and fueled by Spielberg’s lean direction and Robert Rodat’s stirring script, Ryan won five Academy Awards against 11 nominations, made more than $500 million worldwide, and earned glowing praise from critics like the Los Angeles Times’s Kenneth Turan, who wrote, “A powerful and impressive milestone in the realistic depiction of combat, Saving Private Ryan is as much an experience we live through as a film we watch on screen.

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The Martian (2015) 91%

With a name like The Martian, a person could be forgiven for assuming this Ridley Scott sci-fi thriller took filmgoers to the Red Planet for cool-looking alien creatures and awesome space battles. Instead, we got Matt Damon and a bunch of potatoes — as well as one of the most engaging outer-space dramas in Hollywood history. Damon plays Mark Watney, a member of a Mars expedition who’s presumed dead and abandoned when a freak storm forces his crew to evacuate the planet; faced with all-but-certain death, he relies on science and old-fashioned ingenuity to stay alive long enough for NASA to realize he didn’t perish in the storm — and for his fellow astronauts to mount their own daring rescue attempt. In adapting Andy Weir’s bestselling novel, Scott and screenwriter Drew Goddard deftly blend a futuristic premise with immediately relatable human stakes, while The Martian‘s star made the most of a rare opportunity to shoulder a blockbuster hit virtually unassisted. “Damon is terrific,” wrote Richard Roeper for the Chicago Sun-Times. “The movie lives and breathes on his performance, and he comes through in every scene.”

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The Bourne Ultimatum (2007) 92%

It seems laughable now, but before The Bourne Identity reached theaters, there were a lot of people who didn’t think Matt Damon had what it took to be a convincing action hero. Those doubts were quickly erased with director Doug Liman’s sleek, powerful adaptation of the Robert Ludlum novel — a huge box office hit that was powered with equal parts explosive set pieces and a solid central performance by its star. As it turned out, Damon had not only the dramatic chops to realistically portray the fear and confusion of an amnesiac who slowly begins to realize he’s a lethal assassin, but the physical presence to make audiences believe he could kill a man with a pen — and launch a franchise that has had filmgoers lining up to follow a global trail of high-speed car chases, conspiracy cover-ups, and hand-held cameras shakily capturing some truly impressive hand-to-hand combat. The franchise hit its peak with its third installment, The Bourne Ultimatum, which brought some closure to the Bourne saga before its director, Paul Greengrass, eventually reunited with Damon to bring us this week’s Jason Bourne. “Who needs an identity,” quipped Peter Keough of the Boston Phoenix, “when you’re having this much fun?”

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Behind the Candelabra (2013) 94%

A longtime passion project for director Steven Soderbergh, Behind the Candelabra languished in development limbo for years while the Oscar-winning filmmaker struggled to find funding for a drama depicting the last years of the flamboyant pianist Liberace, as told through his estranged ex-lover Scott Thorston. Even with Michael Douglas attached as Liberace and Damon on board to play Thorston, Candelabra remained stuck until HBO stepped in to cover the budget — and ended up reaping record ratings for a TV movie on the way to achieving major awards recognition, including an Outstanding Lead Actor Emmy nomination for Damon. (Douglas, meanwhile, won Outstanding Lead Actor, while Candelabra itself walked away with Outstanding Miniseries or Movie.) “Douglas is more than acceptable, but Damon has made an unforgettable character,” wrote David Thomson for the New Republic. “Scott Thorson is unknown and he comes out of the dark as the story that needs to be told.”

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True Grit (2010) 95%

If you’re going to remake a movie as well-known (and critically beloved) as John Wayne’s True Grit, you’ll need a few things to make it work, including tons of chutzpah and a whole bunch of talent on the set. Fortunately for filmgoers, the 2010 version of the movie not only satisfied all of the above requirements — with the Coen brothers behind the cameras and an outstanding cast that included Damon, Jeff Bridges, Josh Brolin, and (making her unforgettable debut) Hailee Steinfeld — but it brought something new to the table in the bargain, focusing on the story as told in Charles Portis’ novel rather than trying to out-Duke the Duke. The result was as charmingly idiosyncratic as you’d expect from the Coens, with Bridges and Damon affecting entertainingly outrageous frontier accents in their characters’ pursuit of the scumbag (Brolin) who murdered the father of a feisty young girl (Steinfeld), and picked up an impressive 10 Oscar nominations. While it didn’t win any, it did earn plenty of accolades from critics like Salon’s Andrew O’Hehir, who wrote, “Some people are expressing amazement that Joel and Ethan Coen would set out to make a classic western in the first place, and then that they’d accomplish it. All I can say is that those folks haven’t been paying attention.”

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Good Will Hunting (1997) 97%

Before you even opened this list, you probably knew we’d end up here. And for good reason: Good Will Hunting is not only the massive left-field success that launched Damon and his pal/co-writer Ben Affleck into the Hollywood stratosphere, it’s a smart, tenderly written tale of the ways love and friendship can help build a bridge between the memories that haunt us and the futures we dream of. With empathetic direction from Gus Van Sant, beautiful music from Danny Elfman and Elliott Smith, and an Oscar-winning supporting performance from Robin Williams, Good Will Hunting was the kind of film that played equally well to the arthouse and cineplex crowds — and the kind of story that makes you feel good about loving movies. As Margaret McGurk of the Cincinnati Enquirer put it, “Good Will Hunting is another auspicious sign that the best of Young Hollywood is not only bringing back respect for the craft of acting, but for the cogent telling of tales as well.”

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