Jeremy Renner and Hailee Steinfeld in HAWKEYE

(Photo by Marvel Studios)

Marvel TV Shows Ranked from Worst to Best

Updated December 3, 2021

Disney+’s new MCU-tied streaming series are the latest threat to the rankings of all Marvel TV shows. How do the comic book giant’s television properties currently stack up?

Hawkeye, Marvel’s Hit Monkey, and Marvel’s Helstrom all joined our list of Marvel series by Tomatometer. The streamer’s third original MCU offering, Loki, initially knocked Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. from the top spot on our ranking after the Tom Hiddleston–led series’ premiere episode. The series has since taken a small tumble, and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is back at No. 1 despite hefty competition from the first Disney+ series WandaVision and Daredevil, the highest-scoring Netflix-Marvel collaboration.

We’ve included titles that have at least 10 reviews, and ties were resolved by the number of reviews for each title and further by the “Average Rating” under “Score Details” in cases where two series have the same score and the same number of reviews.

Check back regularly as new Marvel titles like upcoming series Secret Invasion debut.

Disagree with the results? Tell us in the comments which series you think should have scored higher (or lower) with critics.

Recently added: Hawkeye, Marvel’s Helstrom, and Marvel’s Hit Monkey.

Inhumans (2017)
11%

#23
Synopsis: Black Bolt, the enigmatic, commanding head of the Inhuman royal family and King of Attilan, possesses a voice so powerful... [More]

Marvel's Helstrom (2020)
27%

#22
Synopsis: Daimon and Ana Helstrom are the son and daughter of a mysterious and powerful serial killer; the siblings have a... [More]

Marvel's Iron Fist (2017)
37%

#21
Synopsis: When Danny Rand was 10-years old, he survived a mysterious plane crash that claimed the lives of his extremely wealthy... [More]

Powers (2015)
48%

#20
Synopsis: Homicide detectives Christian Walker and Deena Pilgrim investigate cases involving superhuman powers, but their efforts are fraught with trouble due... [More]

#19
Synopsis: ... [More]
Starring:

#18
Synopsis: After exacting revenge on the people responsible for the deaths of his wife and children, Frank Castle uncovers a conspiracy... [More]
Directed By: Steve Lightfoot

Marvel's Hit-Monkey (2021)
77%

#17
Synopsis: A vengeful Japanese snow monkey and the ghost of an American assassin cut down Tokyo's underworld.... [More]

#16
Synopsis: Four of Marvel's biggest heroes are each working individually but have one common goal in mind -- to save New... [More]

The Gifted (2017)
79%

#15
Synopsis: Produced in association with Marvel Television, and set in the "X-Men" universe, family adventure series "The Gifted" is about an... [More]

#14
Synopsis: This Netflix original chronicles the life of one of the darker Marvel characters, the mysterious Jessica Jones. When a tragedy... [More]

Marvel's Runaways (2017)
85%

#13
Synopsis: There are times when pretty much every teenager thinks his or her parents are evil -- but what if it... [More]

#12
Synopsis: Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell, reprising her role from the "Captain America" films) is an unstoppable secret agent for the Strategic... [More]

Cloak and Dagger (2018)
87%

#11
Synopsis: The collapse of an oil rig in New Orleans owned by the company Roxxon causes two teenagers to become unlikely... [More]

Marvel's Luke Cage (2016)
87%

#10
Synopsis: This gritty, action-packed drama follows the evolution of Luke Cage (Mike Colter), a man with super strength and unbreakable skin... [More]

Marvel's M.O.D.O.K. (2021)
88%

#9
Synopsis: While pursuing his dream of conquering the world, a megalomaniacal supervillain runs his evil organization into the ground.... [More]

Synopsis: Falcon and the Winter Soldier are a mismatched duo who team up for a global adventure that will test their... [More]
Directed By: Kari Skogland

Legion (2017)
91%

#7
Synopsis: David Haller is a troubled young man who was diagnosed with schizophrenia as a child. Shuffled from one psychiatric institution... [More]

WandaVision (2021)
91%

#6
Synopsis: Living idealized suburban lives, super-powered beings Wanda and Vision begin to suspect that everything is not as it seems.... [More]
Directed By: Jac Schaeffer, Kevin Feige

#5
Synopsis: In life, it doesn't take wearing a suit of iron, carrying a mythical hammer or swinging from spider webs to... [More]
Starring:

Loki (2021)
92%

#4
Synopsis: Loki, the God of Mischief, steps out of his brother's shadow to embark on an adventure that takes place after... [More]

Hawkeye (2021)
92%

#3
Synopsis: Clint Barton and Kate Bishop shoot a few arrows and try to avoid becoming the target themselves.... [More]

Marvel's Daredevil (2015)
92%

#2
Synopsis: The first in a planned series of shows detailing the Marvel universe, "Daredevil" follows Matt Murdock, attorney by day and... [More]

Synopsis: The worldwide law-enforcement organization known as S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strategic Homeland Intervention Enforcement and Logistics Division) employs an elite team of agents... [More]

The seemingly abrupt cancellation of Krypton left fans of the odd-but-scrappy series blindsided. Then again, fans of comics often know the sting of cancellation.

Because of the much smaller lead time involved in comic book publishing, a well-known series can end quickly with a surprise announcement on social media (see: the end of The Walking Dead). And, every so often, they end in mid-story. In the late 1970s, when market forces turned against DC Comics’ expanding lineup, the company released two issues of Canceled Comics Cavalcade — a collection of completed stories from the many comic books it cancelled in 1978.

Looking at the last year, there are certainly enough now-cancelled television shows based on comic books to form a “Cancelled TV Cavalcade” all their own. A few shows, like Arrow and Legion, were (or are) able to end on the creators’ own terms. Others managed to complete their stories despite the presumption of another season. But still others might not have been so lucky.

Below, we examine the cancelled comic book shows of 2018 and 2019 to find out which fit best in a present-day version of Cancelled Comics Cavalcade.


Krypton

KRYPTON -- "Danger Close" Episode 204 -- Pictured: Cameron Cuffe as Seg-El -- (Photo by: Steffan Hill/SYFY)

(Photo by Steffan Hill/SYFY)

Where It Left Off: Brainiac (Blake Ritson) kidnapped baby Jor-El and took him to Earth. Nyssa-Vex (Wallis Day) found herself on a strange planet bracing for a Thanagarian Invasion and, possibly, an Omega Men intervention.

Cancelled Too Soon? Absolutely. In the season 1 finale, Superman ceased to exist and the show made no effort to restore him. Instead, it found its own story to tell with Seg-El (Cameron Cuffe) making his way back to Krypton while his grandfather Val-El (Ian McElhinney) led a resistance against Dru-Zod (Colin Samon). Across the 20 episodes of the series, Cuffe, Salmon, and actors like Georgia Campbell and Rasmus Hardiker breathed life into the characters, making them more than just weird footnotes in Superman’s backstory. The show also pulled off the most interesting, accurate, and terrifying version of Doomsday yet realized on screen.

Thanks to showrunner Cameron Welsh, we know the third season would’ve seen Brainiac raising Jor-El on modern-day Earth — a twist on the Superman: Red Son story we are shattered we’ll never get to see. Maybe it can be resolved on Lobo — the Krypton spinoff that may still make it to air, as it’s still being shopped around to networks — or a revived Krypton series itself. Stranger things have happened.


Marvel’s Jessica Jones

Krysten Ritter in Marvel's Jessica Jones (David Giesbrecht/Netflix)

(Photo by David Giesbrecht/Netflix)

Where It Left Off: Despite putting Trish (Rachael Taylor) on The Raft — Marvel’s high security prison for super-powered people — and planning an escape from New York, Jessica (Krysten Ritter) decides to embrace her heroic self and defend her city.

Cancelled Too Soon? Oddly enough, no. The shape of Jessica Jones as a series was always defined by Jessica and Trish. Both aspired to be heroes and both suffered for it across the three seasons. That Trish’s fondest wish would curdle and set her against Jessica makes sense. At the same time, Jessica’s decision to turn Trish in to the authorities — and make Trish’s slide into vigilantism public — felt like the appropriate climax for this version of the series. And Jessica’s decision to go back to her office at the end has a sense of thematic finality to it. No matter what adversary she might have faced in a fourth season, Jessica’s doubts are behind her.

While the series might have found a way to continue has Netflix wanted another year, this feels like the ending showrunner Melissa Rosenberg always aiming toward.


Swamp Thing

Swamp Thing -- Ep.101 -- "Pilot" -- Photo Credit: Brownie Harris/2018 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

(Photo by Brownie Harris/2018 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.)

Where It Left Off: Swamp Thing (Derek Mears) learned he was a plant who thinks he is a man, but decides to remain in physical form to both stay with Abby (Crystal Reed) and protect the swamp. Meanwhile, at the Marais PD, Jason Woodrue (Kevin Durand) completed his transformation into the Floronic Man.

Cancelled Too Soon? Most definitely. DC Universe’s Swamp Thing proved a high-quality series can be built around the character and other members of DC Comics’ horror gallery. The writing often felt like reading a DC Vertigo book from the 1990s and the performances never faltered — at least until the truncated ending, where slow burns for Daniel Cassidy (Ian Ziering) and Maria Sutherland (Virginia Madsen) suddenly went into overdrive to feel more “conclusive.”

Swamp Thing also proved a high-quality series based on the character is out of the financial reach of most streaming services. Maybe if another platform wanted Swamp Thing — and a few other characters like Madame Xanadu and the Phantom Stranger — as their only prestige DC show, the budget might actually work out.


The Tick

The Tick season 2 (Amazon Prime Video)

(Photo by Amazon Prime Video)

Where It Left Off: AEGIS director Tyrannosaurus Rathbone (Marc Kudisch) is compromised by the squid hiding in his heart, not that The Tick (Peter Serafinowicz) or Arthur (Griffin Newman) noticed anything different about him. They were too busy heading off on patrol. Meanwhile, in space, Superian (Brendan Hines) plans to turn back the flow of time.

Cancelled Too Soon? Yes and no. Though it is clear creator Ben Edlund wanted to keep going, the final episode of season 2 works as a fine coda to the ideas established early in the first season. The Tick and Arthur end up as recognized heroes and Arthur’s family shed all their various secrets. Even Overkill (Scott Speiser) has found some acceptance. If not for the two cliffhangers regarding Rathbone and Superian, this would feel like a natural end of the story.

But then again, it is The Tick and we can never get enough of it — especially in this incarnation. And as Newman told us back in March, the show was nearing a place where it could introduce some of the classic characters from the cartoon and 2001 live-action series. The Tick always finds a way back to TV, though, so we imagine a new iteration will be here before too long.


Marvel’s Luke Cage

Luke Cage keyart (Netflix)

(Photo by Netflix)

Where It Left Off: After both protecting and facing off against Mariah Stokes (Alfre Woodard), Luke Cage (Mike Colter) found himself in control of her family’s nightclub, Harlem’s Paradise, and her criminal enterprise. Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

Cancelled Too Soon? Yes. Perhaps more than any other Marvel shows on Netflix, that hypothetical next season of Luke Cage had a clear direction in front of it: Could Luke turn Mariah’s poisoned chalice into a boon for the neighborhood? Or would the power consume him as it did Mariah, her cousin Cornell (Mahershala Ali), and the rest of her family before her? Those questions are so powerful that they echoed over into Jessica Jones’s finale thanks to Luke’s brief cameo. It set up a showdown between the two characters we will never see.

But beyond the crossover potential, we just wanted to see Luke in charge and seeing what self-imposed rules he would bend to be Harlem’s undisputed defender.


Gotham

GOTHAM: Cory Michael Smith as Edward Nygma / The Riddler; Robin Lord Taylor as Oswald Cobblepot / Penguin; Camren Bicondova as Selina Kyle / the future Catwoman; Cameron Monaghan as Jerome Valeska / Jeremiah Valeska; Shane West as Eduardo Dorrance; Erin Richards as Barbara Kean in season 5 ©2018 Fox Broadcasting Co. Cr: JUSTIN STEPHENS / FOX

(Photo by Justin Stephens/Fox)

Where It Left Off: After ten years of relative calm, the criminal insane of Gotham City returned to raise havoc. But this time, things will be different as Jim Gordon (Ben McKenzie) has a new ally in the war on crime: the Bat-Man (David Mazouz).

Cancelled Too Soon? Gotham ended at just the right moment, which seemed to be the point of the final storyline. It was clear Jim’s leading role was coming to an end. It had to, as there were few ways left to compromise his integrity and still make him worthy of the Bat-Man’s friendship at the end. Also, most of the villains, like Penguin (Robin Lord Taylor) and Riddler (Cory Michael Smith), were fully formed by the end of season 4 — meaning it was time to end that story and begin a legend of the Dark Knight.


Preacher

Dominic Cooper as Jesse Custer, Ruth Negga as Tulip O'Hare - Preacher _ Season 3, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Alfonso Bresciani/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

(Photo by Alfonso Bresciani/AMC/Sony Pictures Television)

Where It Left Off: There are still a few episodes to go.

Cancelled Too Soon? This is the Goldilocks show — the creative team paced it out just right. The original Preacher comic book spanned 66 issues, five special releases, and a miniseries focused on the Saint of Killers. It was never really built to run that long. At the same time, it is something of a miracle that AMC gave the show four years to raise Hell and make Hitler an ongoing character. But a story flirting with the profane like Preacher can only last so long.


Marvel’s Daredevil

Marvel's Daredevil SEASON Season 3 EPISODE 7 PHOTO CREDIT David Lee/Netflix PICTURED Charlie Cox

(Photo by David Lee/Netflix)

Where It Left Off: With Wilson Fisk (Vincent D’Onofrio) defeated and Matt Murdoch’s (Charlie Cox) soul intact, the Daredevil of Hell’s Kitchen found himself ready to reclaim his public identity and form a new law firm with Foggy Nelson (Elden Hensen) and Karen Page (Deborah Ann Woll). Meanwhile, a broken Dex (Wilson Bethel) sees nothing but bull’s eyes.

Cancelled Too Soon? Despite the clearer creative direction of season 3 and the Bullseye stinger, Daredevil found thematic completion in its final moments by reuniting Nelson, Murdoch, and Page. Their friendship — and the way Matt tested it as Daredevil — was as much the story as Matt’s struggle against Fisk or The Hand. Sure, Foggy and Karen were always willing to help Matt, but his journey to be worthy of their friendship was something he had to finish in the most ridiculous and brutal fashion. The fact all three characters came out of the brutality of season 3 in tact makes it difficult to imagine how the series would go back to that blood-soaked well for a fourth. Like Jessica Jones, there could be a way, but we don’t think it would be as satisfying a story as the one presented in Daredevil’s final Netflix appearance.


Deadly Class

DEADLY CLASS -- "Reagan Youth" Episode 100 -- Pictured: Benjamin Wadsworth as Marcus -- (Photo by: Allen Fraser/Syfy)

(Photo by Allen Fraser/Syfy)

Where It Left Off: Marcus (Benjamin Wadworth) managed to recover Chico’s severed head, but he and Maria (María Gabriela de Faria) immediately find Chico’s father waiting for them with guns drawn. Meanwhile, Gao (Olivia Cheng) took Lin’s (Benedict Wong) daughter for an initiation.

Cancelled Too Soon? Yes. The show was only getting started. That said, while Deadly Class may not have been as satisfying as Krypton or Happy!, it nonetheless had a solid cast, and interesting setting, and a world in which Wong could get a fight scene all his own. Also, that cliffhanger is just a rough place to leave things. But let’s just pretend Saya (Lana Condor) bailed Marcus and Maria out of their current predicament.


Marvel’s The Punisher

Marvel's The Punisher - Jon Bernthal (Nicole Rivelli /Netflix)

(Photo by Nicole Rivelli /Netflix)

Where It Left Off: Frank (Jon Bernthal) left a trail of bloody corpses ranging from Billy Russo (Ben Barnes) to the leaders of a religious movement. He also saved Amy’s (Giorgia Whigham) soul. Madani (Amber Rose Rivah), meanwhile, transferred to the CIA and offered Frank a job, but The Punisher always goes his own way.

Cancelled Too Soon? In its Netflix form, no. One of the things that makes Frank so appealing also makes him wrong for a ongoing television series: He cannot change. As both seasons of The Punisher demonstrated, he is a killing machine who will only be at peace while plotting murders or executing people he perceives as the bad guy. There’s no journey for Frank — especially now that all of the people connected to his family’s execution are dead. The narrative weight falls on characters like Madani and Amy. But with Amy off in Florida and Madani an employee of “The Company,” their character arcs are at an end. Like Jessica Jones and Daredevil, the series completed its thematic throughlines. It also used every bit of plot it could wring from Frank’s time on Daredevil. All a subsequent season could do is pit him against the Gnucci crime family — or Annabella Sciorra‘s Rosalie Carbone — but it would be little else than violent scenes. Sure, there’s a catharsis there, but that’s only good for a handful of episodes before it becomes repetitive.

Because of his inflexibility, Frank is better suited as a support character who is not required to grow and change.


Happy!

Chris Meloni as Nick Sax, Patton Oswald as Happy! (Syfy)

(Photo by Syfy)

Where It Left Off: God (Jeff Goldblum) told Happy (Patton Oswalt) to look out for the “half-zombie” of Nick Sax (Christopher Meloni). Six months later, Sax reappeared to get his revenge on Smoothie (Patrick Fischler), but it is unclear if death suits either of them. Meanwhile, Hailey (Bryce Lorenzo) is off becoming an assassin with Meredith (Lili Mirojnick) while Amanda (Medina Senghore) stews in the slammer.

Cancelled Too Soon? Yes and no. On the one hand, we’re pretty disappointed we’ll never see Happy and Nick’s Halloween reunion. On the other hand, something as wild as Happy! must burn brightly and fade quickly to maintain its unique character. Sure, there would be ways for the show to continue — there are more holidays to satirize — but the best destiny of Grant Morrison and Crank co-director Brian Taylor’s strange and wonderful TV show was always that of an all-too brief firework. If it had continued, we can’t imagine the show keeping its spark past Halloween.


Marvel’s Iron Fist

Marvel's Iron Fist SEASON Season 2 EPISODE 1 PHOTO CREDIT Linda Kallerus/Netflix PICTURED Finn Jones, Jessica Henwick

(Photo by Linda Kallerus/Netflix)

Where It Left Off: Danny Rand (Finn Jones) and Colleen Wing (Jessica Henwick) both have powers of the immortal Iron Fist in their weapons. Somehow, Ward Meachum (Tom Pelphrey) is still alive.

Cancelled Too Soon? Ha, no. Despite a stronger second season, Iron Fist never fixed its key conceptual problem: Danny Rand — at least in his TV form — is a supporting character. Consider his much stronger guest appearance in the second season of Luke Cage, or the way Colleen and Misty Knight (Simone Missick) steal the series from him, and you see just how misguided this endeavor really was. That’s said, we’d happily watch all of these characters in a Heroes for Hire series played by these actors.


Featured image credit: Steffan Hill/SYFY; Netflix; Myles Aronowitz/Netflix

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The first season of Marvel’s Iron Fist didn’t go quite right. It earned a 19% on the Tomatometer and is notable for being the least creatively successful of the initial four Marvel television programs on Netflix. Daredevil fared much better with a Certified Fresh 99%, while Jessica Jones and Luke Cage debuted with respective Certified Fresh scores of 93% and 94%.

The series, starring Finn Jones as Danny Rand, a Manhattan-born scion of an industrialist family who learns the secrets of the Immortal Iron Fist while stranded in an inter-dimensional Far East city, had a number of things going against it. Jones was cast late and the production had little money or time to train him (or anyone else) for the fight scenes. And, let’s face it, a show called Iron Fist needs to have great fight scenes. On the emotional front, characters often varied wildly from episode to episode – particularly Danny, who went from Zen master to little boy at lightning speed – while the first season’s story line bore the responsibility of establishing The Hand’s more mystical elements ahead of Marvel’s The Defenders and its own ongoing Iron Fist elements like Danny’s relationship with Colleen Wing (Jessica Henwick) and the travails of the Meachum family.

But over a year later, Iron Fist is back with a second season, new executive producer Raven Metzer at the helm, and a seemingly stronger sense of direction. The critical response so far has been much better – a 38% improvement over the inaugural season. Nonetheless, it is understandable if you may have some misgivings about giving the show a second chance. Maybe the following five aspects of the new season will compel you to try the first handful of episodes.


1. The Fights Look Better

From its opening moments, in which Danny takes on some armored truck thieves representing one of the gangs hoping to replace The Hand, Iron Fist’s second season makes the fight scenes a priority. Behind the scenes, the production hired stunt coordinator Clayton Barber to revamp the style and tone of the program’s martial arts action. A veteran of productions like HBO’s Fahrenheit 451 and Marvel Studios’ Black Panther, Barber said he was hoping to create a “punk rock kung fu song” with the fights, focusing on tempo and rhythm. The Chinese restaurant fight later in the first season 2 episode underscores this approach.

Barber also worked with the actors so they could do substantially more of their own stunts this time. Jones, for example, began stunt training four months ahead of the production and took an additional five months getting into shape. While stunt doubles were still employed for some shots, Barber said, “the cast was up to the task, and we got a really good result.”

In fact, the series was confident enough in its fight scenes to show five of them during the program’s panel presentation at Comic-Con International: San Diego back in July. While the armored car battle, and portions of the Chinese restaurant brawl and the K’un-Lun fights have appeared in clips and preview material since, a glimpse of fight scene between Colleen, Misty Knight (Simone Missick), and Typhoid Mary (Alice Eve) also revealed just how much had changed on the series, with Misty, in particular, facing some of the most visceral action yet.

Again, a show called Iron Fist needs to have great fight scenes, and the fights revealed so far definitely have some energy to them.


2. A Clearer Direction For Danny

Marvel's Iron Fist SEASON Season 2 EPISODE 1 PHOTO CREDIT Linda Kallerus/Netflix PICTURED Finn Jones, Jessica Henwick

(Photo by Linda Kallerus/Netflix)

Where the first season saw Danny wavering between his duty as the Iron Fist and his wish to reintegrate into his old life, the second year sees him solider on with a renewed purpose following The Hand’s defeat in The Defenders, honoring the “dying” wish of Matt Murdoch (Charlie Cox) and defending his city. This sees Danny refusing to use his fortune – another issue he wavered on in the first year – and roaming the streets at night to stop a brewing gang war to see which outfit will replace The Hand.

According to Jones, Danny is taking his mission “very seriously” even as he continues to grow as a normal, functioning adult.

“He’s also moved in with his girlfriend, Colleen, so he’s coming of age, and he’s trying to balance all those things,” Jones said. Not that balancing those things is easy, especially as Danny is “enjoying himself — maybe a little bit too much.”

Nonetheless, the clearer presentation of Danny makes for a lead protagonist viewers may find more appealing.


3. Davos Makes a Better Antagonist

Marvel's Iron Fist SEASON Season 2 EPISODE 9 PHOTO CREDIT Linda Kallerus/Netflix PICTURED Sacha Dhawan, Finn Jones

(Photo by Linda Kallerus/Netflix)

Season 1’s mixture of Harold Meachum (David Wenham) and various Hand operatives like Madame Gao (Wai Ching Ho) and Colleen’s mentor Bakuto (Ramon Rodriguez) – to say nothing of Ward Meachum’s (Tom Pelphry) journey – left the show unfocused in terms of the antagonists. But season 2 offers a much stronger opponent for Danny in the form of his K’un-Lun friend Davos (Sacha Dhawan), known to comic book fans as Steel Serpent. Appalled by Danny’s choices – and his apparent failure to protect K’un-Lun from The Hand – Davos was more than ready to ally with anyone opposed to Danny in the first season’s final moments.

Ultimately, the thing turning Davos from friend to foe, however, is his unwavering belief that he should be the Immortal Iron Fist. It is the key issue in that K’un-Lun fight we’ve seen in preview clips, which will be seen in full in the new season’s second episode, and it leads him toward an ability which could shake Danny’s hold on the Iron Fist.

And if you recall the end of first season, he’s also likely in league with Joy Meachum (Jessica Stroup).

The nature of their bond makes Davos a much stronger antagonist for Danny. In season 1, The Hand was something of a theoretical opponent for Danny based in little more than stories told about them in K’un-Lun. Even Harold Meachum, despite his connection to The Hand and his direct involvement in the plane crash which killed Danny’s parents and left him stranded, never made the fight truly personal. Davos, a person who is essentially Danny’s brother, makes the conflict much more palpable for the title character. It also makes the fight more difficult as Danny would still have empathy for him versus the more black-and-white way he looked at The Hand.

A stronger conflict, like one between brothers, can only aid the series overall.


4. Deepening Characters

Marvel's Iron Fist SEASON Season 2 EPISODE 2 PHOTO CREDIT Linda Kallerus/Netflix PICTURED Jessica Henwick, Finn Jones, Alice Eve

(Photo by Linda Kallerus/Netflix)

And like Danny and Davos, all the surviving characters appear to have more care and attention given to them. Colleen, for example, faces an internal conflict about staying in the fight following the events of The Defenders.

As Henwick told Rotten Tomatoes back in July, “Colleen’s like a bunch of contradictions. She says she doesn’t want to fight, but as you see she’s still fighting … She doesn’t want to live this life, being a vigilante, but she’s still dating a vigilante, so it’s kind of inevitable that you get pulled into all this drama that’s happening in Chinatown.”

Ward, meanwhile, continues his journey into — well, whatever Ward ends up being. His strange arc in season 1 was one of the highlights — even if he’s a character viewers love to hate — and the start of season 2 see him enjoying a little hedonistic backslide even as he tries to get help for his myriad issues. As for Joy, it seems pretty clear where she’s headed thanks to her new alliances. From the jump, she seems poised for simple revenge, but that motivation becomes less clear as things move forward. And considering her comic book counterpart’s character arc, Joy may end up in a very different place by the end.

One new character joining the series is Typhoid Mary. Played by Alice Eve, the classic Daredevil comic book villain joins Davos’ scheme to undo Danny. Mary’s various personalities may feel differently about this after a few episodes, however. A sufferer of Dissociative Identity Disorder, she invents personalities to protect the vulnerable person Danny first meets in a key scene of the second season’s debut episode. Her other personas, however, are definitely itching for a fight.

With one new key character and a number of returning characters needing no introduction, the opportunity to turn some them (yes, even Ward) into fan favorites is certainly possible.


5. The Daughters of the Dragon Debut — Sort Of

It is no secret that Misty Knight is coming downtown for Iron Fist’s second season, but as Missick told us in July, her story line will not be a full debut of the Colleen/Misty team-up known as the Daughters of the Dragon.

“I don’t think the fans are going to get to see them in the way that they hope, that peak, but I think it is a nice change,” she explained at the time.

Nonetheless, the pair will be featured in at least two fights across the season and though Misty has her own police-related reasons for visiting the neighborhood, she will offer Colleen the same emotional kick-in-the-pants Colleen offered her early in Luke Cage’s second season.

Of course, their time together will still inspire fans to demand a Daughters of the Dragon series all their own. As Luke Cage showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker mentioned to us back in June, people were already asking him for that series based on a short clip from their team-up on Cage.

“I think that they bring out a side to each other that you don’t get to see otherwise,” Henwick said of the duo during Comic-Con. “They have the same sense of humor, and they’re badass — what’s not to love?”

Considering the way fans have embraced the characters, this may be reason enough to watch Iron Fist‘s second season. Or, at the very least, try a handful of episodes.

Marvel’s Iron Fist season 2 is now streaming on Netflix.

Charlie Hunnam as Jackson 'Jax' Teller in Sons of Anarchy keyart (FX)

(Photo by FX)

Fall TV is upon us, and there is so much coming your way this month! Check out 13 shows you should catch up on over the long Labor Day weekend and beyond.


Sons of Anarchy 87% (FX)


What it is: The Kurt Sutter series helped secure the bad-boy stance FX is still working today. The crime drama, about an outlaw motorcycle club in California’s Central Valley, starred Charlie Hunnam as Jax Teller, a club member who begins to question the violence and crime of his chosen lifestyle. The series also starred Katey Sagal, Maggie Siff, Ron Perlman, and later Jimmy Smits.

Why you should watch it: To get ready for the next chapter in the Sons of Anarchy saga. There’s a lot riding on Mayans M.C. — and there’s a lot to look forward to when it premieres September 4. The new series follows Ezekiel “EZ” Reyes (JD Pardo), who’s newly released from prison and now a new prospect in the titular biker gang. Fans of Sons of Anarchy know well enough what’s in store for them with this much-anticipated spin-off: a character-driven, tightly woven, violent (at times even grisly) drama. The new series also stars Edward James Olmos, Clayton Cardenas, and Sarah Bolger.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 66 hours


It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia  (FXX)


What it is: The premise here is simple, but it works: Five friends (whose ineptitude goes beyond just social cues to pretty much every facet of day-to-day life) run an Irish bar in the titular city and have one misadventure after the next along the way.

Why you should watch it: You don’t become one of the longest-running live-action comedies of all time by sitting on your laurels and getting lazy about the laughs. It’s Always Sunny lays them on thick and fearlessly week to week for 12-going-on-13 seasons strong. That’s a lot to binge — so get to it! Season 13 premieres September 5.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, MicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 50 hours


Marvel's Iron Fist 37%Marvel - The Defenders 78% | Marvel's Luke Cage: Season 2 (2018) 85% (Netflix)


What it is: Set in New York City, Iron Fist is the story of Danny Rand, a presumed-dead heir to a billion-dollar fortune who returns to New York City 15 years after a fatal plane crash kills his parents (and many believed him). He brings with him a skill set that includes unexplained kung-fu superpowers.

Why you should watch it: While Iron Fist was admittedly not as well received as its Marvel-on-Netflix counterparts, if you’re a fan of the universe, it’s definitely worth tuning in to orient yourself in the world of Marvel’s The Defenders, which also includes Daredevil (Charlie Cox), Jessica Jones (Krysten Ritter), and Luke Cage (Mike Colter), who also recently had a second season in which Danny Rand appears. We recommend at least binging Iron Fist season 1 and The Defenders before the former’s September 7 season 2 premiere. Here’s hoping Danny Rand’s new solo outing learned from its missteps the first round.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 48 hours for the three seasons


The Deuce 93% (HBO)


What it is: From creator David Simon (The Wire), The Deuce deep dives into 1970s Times Square — more specifically, the men and women dabbling in sex work to make a living. It’s a true ensemble piece, but Maggie Gyllenhaal stars as a prostitute named Candy and James Franco stars as identical twin brothers Vincent and Frankie Martino.

Why you should watch it: By transporting us to a gritty world of sex, drugs, and an American Dream that’s foreign to most audiences today, The Deuce further proves Simon’s talent for creating series that are absolutely singular and authentic. Plus with talent  like Gyllenhaal and Franco attached, it certainly ranks within prestige TV’s must-watch club. Season 2 premieres September 9.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HBO NowMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 8.5 hours


Shameless 82% (Showtime)


What it is: This comedy series has been around for so long that it’s hard to define it without giving away eight seasons of spoilers. But at its core, it’s an hour-long dysfunctional family comedy-drama about six children (led by Emmy Rossum as Fiona) who were forced to grow up too fast while under the watch of their single, alcoholic father, Frank (William H. Macy).

Why you should watch it: It’s tricky to strike the balance between broad comedy and aching drama, but it’s a skill that Shameless has perfected since its 2011 debut. Credit where it’s due: Rossum is an absolutely fearless knockout who bests herself season to season. (Soak up this performance while you can — Rossum recently indicated on Facebook that this season might be her last.) It’s an excellent ensemble, and you can’t help but love the Gallagher family (even when they don’t make it easy), but watching the actress and Oscar-nominee Macy go toe-to-toe as the central headstrong daughter and father just gets better with age. Season 9 premieres Sept. 9.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 89 hours


American Horror Story 77% (FX)


What it is: You don’t have to watch every season of American Horror Story to catch up for season 8, but as the series’ first crossover season — this time of Murder House (season 1) and Coven (season 3) —  we’d recommend binging those and piecing together just how these witches may be caught up with the spawn of Satan and more.

Why you should watch it: Now going for eight seasons strong and a favorite of critics and audiences alike, this anthological series never ceases to spook. And with returning favorites like Jessica Lange (who won two Emmys for her work on previous seasons) and Ryan Murphy mainstay Sarah Paulson, among many others (Kathy Bates, Evan Peters, and Emma Roberts), Apocalypse is shaping up to be its best outing yet.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 70 hours


BoJack Horseman 93% (Netflix)


What it is: BoJack Horseman (voiced by Will Arnett) was once the hottest horse in town, star of a hit sitcom and riding high in Tinseltown. Fast-forward 20 years, though, and he’s a depressive has-been — and our titular protagonist of this hit Netflix comedy.

Why you should watch it: It’s not often that an alcoholic horse and a fictionalized Hollywood full of as many flawed humans as talking animals teaches you about yourself, but this one does — trust us! While it’s an acquired taste for any viewer, there’s reason BoJack’s blend of pitch-black humor and weighty human circumstance has gained such a cult following over the last four seasons. Catch up before season 5 premieres September 15.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 24 hours


9-1-1 81% (Fox)


What it is: 9-1-1 was a hit from the start. By humanizing members of New York City’s police and fire department as they go above the call of duty in larger-than-life circumstances — all while grappling with their own personal dramas on the home front — the series has earned its spot as one of last year’s strongest newcomers.

Why you should watch it: There’s no doubt that television has been attracting some top-tier talent to the small screen over the last few years, and a series like 9-1-1 — with an ensemble including Angela Bassett, Connie Britton, and Peter Krause paired with a producer like Ryan Murphy — is that trend seen at its very best. Fun, over-the-top escapism abounds in this drama series, but never at the expense of its heart.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 7 hours


Young Sheldon (CBS)


What it is: We all know that The Big Bang Theory’s Sheldon has a one-of-a-kind genius mind, but did you ever wonder just what he was like as a kid? Young Sheldon answers that question and then some while charting the nine-year-old boy-genius’s life.

Why you should watch it: Young Sheldon provides something that we haven’t seen before: a reinterpretation of a beloved multi-camera sitcom character as a single-camera, family-friendly, and heartwarming dramedy. Better yet, because this is a prologue series to Jim Parson’s Sheldon, our protagonist’s mother, Mary, is played by Zoe Perry, the real-life daughter of Laurie Metcalf, who stars as the same character on The Big Bang Theory! It’s a small-screen first. Season 2 premieres September 24.

Where to watch: AmazonCBS All Access, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft

Commitment: Approx. 8 hours


The Gifted 79% (Fox)


What it is: Stephen Moyer and Amy Acker star in this Marvel series as seemingly normal husband and wife Reed and Kate Strucker who, upon discovering their children’s mutant abilities, take them on the run from those who fear mutants.

Why you should watch it: Will we ever live in a world where there’s too much Marvel? So long as the universe’s crop of series are of the caliber of The Gifted, we’re inclined to say no. Just like the very best releases from the X-Men franchise, this series is heavy on the action, while also packing an emotional punch — and it even delves into political territory, dramatizing prejudices against the “other,” anti-establishment activist movements, extremists groups, and more. Season 2 premieres September 25.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 9.5 hours


Lethal Weapon 89% (Fox)


What it is: The Lethal Weapon films starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover have become somewhat canon for ’80s action nostalgia — so it makes all too much sense that the opposites-attract buddy-cop flick would get a modern reboot. Damon Wayans steps into the shoes of Glover for this one, and while Clayne Crawford took over for Gibson for the first two seasons, Seann William Scott is stepping in this season after behind-the-scenes drama led to Crawford’s dismissal.

Why you should watch it: There’s something inherently appealing about a marriage of the fish-out-of-water and opposites-attract formulas, and the effort holds up for this latest small-screen reboot. With Scott added to the mix, we’re in for even more fun this season. Catch up before season 3 premieres September 25.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 30 hours


Empire 84% (Fox)


What it is: A family drama of Shakespearean proportions, Empire charts the various rises and falls of the Lyon family — for starters, those of patriarch Lucious (Terrence Howard), a hip-hop mogul who’s in the process of choosing an heir to his musical throne.

Why you should watch it: Nothing short of a phenomenon upon its premiere in 2015, Empire is classic Lee Daniels: engrossingly soapy, slightly camp, meticulously performed, and endlessly entertaining. Taraji P. Henson does some of the best work of her career as the scene-stealing and wig-snatching Cookie Lyon. She alone is worth the watch, but it helps that she has an excellent ensemble at her back, led by Howard who acts as the very best foil to her scheming. Season 5 premieres September 26.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 48 hours


The Good Place 97% (NBC)


What it is: Talk about a creative spin on the afterlife! Kristen Bell stars as the recently deceased Eleanor Shellstrop, who by some glitch in the system ends up in the “Good Place,” a Utopian haven for those who served their lives on Earth with grace that was designed by Ted Danson’s Michael. Thing is: Eleanor doesn’t actually fit the bill of admittance and has to keep her righteous new friends fooled if she wants to stick around.

Why you should watch it: The Good Place is certainly among the best network comedies of recent memory. An always-charming Bell and TV royalty Danson play off of each other in a way that — what the fork!? — simply works. We can’t wait to see the good places they take us come season 3’s September 27 premiere.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 9 hours

While the superheroes of The CW, the villains of Gothamand Jessica Jones get set to relax for another season hiatus, the world of comic books on television never really stops. Legion debuted its second season this week while Marvel’s Cloak & Dagger and Luke Cage join the roster in June. But looking further ahead, there are plenty of shows making their returns in the near future and even more in development — proving that comics books remain fertile ground for potentially beloved and long-running television shows. And just on Thursday, FX announced it had ordered a pilot of Y, based on the post-apocalyptic science fiction comic book series Y: The Last Man.

With a wealth of options, here are 16 comic book–inspired shows we cannot wait to see:


Preacher 87% Season 3 (AMC)

Why We Can’t Wait: It’s finally time to meet Gran’ma. While the television version of Preacher enjoys taking detours from its comic book counterpart, one aspect of Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon’s tale that fans have eagerly awaited from the moment Jesse (Dominic Cooper) merged with Genesis: a reckoning with his grandmother (Betty Buckley). Described by the network as “a spiritist with true powers, who can cast spells and even bring back the dead (for a price),” she is one of the most formidable opponents Jesse will ever face. Making matters worse, she genuinely loves him. But fans of the comic book also know someone very important to the overall story makes a special appearance during Jesse and Gran’ma’s reunion, but it remains to be seen if He will finally make his Preacher TV debut.

Returning: 2018


Marvel's Daredevil 92% Season 3 (Netflix)

Why We Can’t Wait: Like Preacher, the third season of Daredevil will also feature a family reunion as Joanne Whalley joins the cast as Sister Maggie, a woman who may have a very important tie to Matt Murdoch (Charlie Cox). But it all depends on how much of the classic Frank Miller story “Born Again” the series decides to adapt. Vincent D’Onofrio is also back as Wilson Fisk, suggesting more of “Born Again,” as that story saw the Kingpin systematically destroying Matt’s life. Of course, in the Netflix version of Daredevil, Matt really doesn’t have much of a life left to destroy. Granted, a fact like that wouldn’t really stop the Kingpin from revenging himself upon Matt for destroying his scheme and last chance for love.

Returning: 2018


Wynonna Earp 92% Season 3 (Syfy)

WYNONNA EARP -- Season:2 -- Pictured: Melanie Scrofano as Wynonna Earp -- (Photo by: Michelle Faye/Wynonna Earp Season 2, Inc./Syfy)

Why We Can’t Wait: Family reunions are all the rage in comic book television as Wynonna Earp will also feature the first appearance of the Earp girls’ mother ,teased briefly at the conclusion of season 2. Anne of Green Gables star Megan Follows will play Michelle Earp as Wynonna (Melanie Scrofano), Doc Holliday (Tim Rozon), Waverly (Dominique Provost-Chalkley), Dolls (Shamier Anderson) and Vincent (Varun Saranga) face off against the Demon Bulshar — aka Sheriff Clootie — and maybe, finally, lift the curse off the Earp clan and the Ghost River Triangle. But with Bobo (Michael Eklund) back in the mix, that may be easier said than done. Meanwhile, Nicole Haught (Katherine Barrell) is hiding something from Waverly and the tension is just unbearable.

Returning: 2018


Marvel's Iron Fist 37% Season 2 (Netflix)

Why We Can’t Wait: Sleepy Hollow’s Raven Metzer takes over the creative reins from Inhumans’s Scott Buck; which means a new direction for the wobbliest of the Netflix Marvel shows. Finn Jones returns as Danny Rand, the Immortal Iron Fist, who must learn to balance his sense of justice with the realities of Marvel’s New York. He will also have to wrestle with Davos (Sacha Dhawan), his old pal from K’un-Lun who made a deal with the Hand and may, depending on how faithful the series will be to the comics, develop powers of his own. Sprinkle in possible appearances from Misty Knight (Simone Missick) and Luke Cage (Mike Colter) and the show has the possibility to finally find its footing.

Debuting: 2018


Titans (DC Streaming Service)

Titans: Alan Richtson and Minka Kelly as Hawk and Dove (Steve Wilkie / ©2017 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.)

Why We Can’t Wait: Authenticity. The handful of promotion photos released so far suggests the series will maintain the look of its DC Comics counterpart in ways never before seen on screen. Our favorite example is the photo of Alan Richtson and Minka Kelly (Friday Night LightsThe Path) as the superhero duo Hawk and Dove. When Rotten Tomatoes spoke with Rob Liefeld, who designed their 1980s look duplicated in the show, he said “This stuff looks off the chain. It’s killer.” Hopefully the rest of the cast, which includes Brenton Thwaites (Blue Lagoon: The Awakening, Gods of Egypt) as Robin, Anna Diop as Starfire, Teagan Croft as Raven, and Ryan Potter (Big Hero Six) as Beast Boy will also be as authentic and “killer” as it brings many of these character to live action for the first time — including DC’s weirdest superhero team, the Doom Patrol!

Debuting: 2018


The Umbrella Academy (Netflix)

The Umbrella Academy (Netflix)

Why We Can’t Wait: Ellen Page headlines the Netflix adaptation of Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba’s short-lived comic series as Vanya Hargreeves, the one member of her family without superpowers. Black SailsTom Hopper and The Mortal Instruments: City of BonesRobert Sheehan also star as members of the Hargreeves family — one with the body of a Martian Gorilla and one with the ability to speak to the dead, respectively. The Hargreeves reunite after the death of their adoptive father, uncovering a mystery and coping with the abuse they suffered at his hands while he tried to make them a superteam. The show has the potential to be very different from other superhero with the comic’s cool aesthetic and use of superpowers as a mechanism to cope with trauma.

Debuting: 2018


The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina (Netflix)

Why We Can’t Wait: Keirnan Shipka as Sabrina the Teenage Witch. Seeing the ex–Sally Draper take on the role of Archie Comics’s favorite spellcaster would be reason enough to get excited for the series. But since it is based on The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, the show will have a certain gothic romance and Hammer horror movie quality absent from the 1990s ABC television series. As Sabrina, Shipka faces spooky houses, witch covens, swamp hags, and one mean high school principal (Bronson Pinchot) as she tries to reconcile her dual nature as a half-witch, half-mortal. Wonder Woman’s Lucy Davis and The Lord of RingsMiranda Otto take on the roles of Sabrina’s witchy aunts. The series was created by Riverdale showrunner Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa.

Debuting: 2019


Marvel's Runaways 85% Season 2 (Hulu)

Why We Can’t Wait: Now that the team has finally, um, run away, the real story begins. Between the self-discovery, young love, and superpowers, Gert (Ariela Barer), Chase (Gregg Sulkin), Alex (Rhenzy Feliz), Nico (Lyrica Okano), Karolina(Virginia Gardner), and Molly (Allegra Acosta) will have to face getting by without money or creature comforts while dodging their parents, avoiding the machinations of Jonah (Julian McMahon) and keeping their dinosaur, Old Lace, from being discovered. The show is still a ways from producing the second season, so no new cast members have been announced as yet, but if the comic books are any guide, you may expect to see a mutant or two — or something very much like one — to pop up when Runways resumes.

Debuting: 2018


Happy! 84% Season 2 (Syfy)

HAPPY! -- "I Am the Future" Episode 108 -- Pictured: (l-r) Chris Meloni, Patton Oswald (Syfy)

Why We Can’t Wait: Few shows are as relentless, mean, and as full of joy as Happy! Christopher Meloni proved he is one of our greatest living actors by diving head first into such a despicable character as Nick Sax. But perhaps the most exciting aspect of the second season will be its 100-percent new story. The original comic book, written by executive producer Grant Morrison, was a four-issue miniseries, meaning whatever Nick and Happy (Patton Oswalt) get up to next year will be a completely unknown tale to fans of the comic.

Debuting: 2019


Watchmen (HBO)

Watchmen (Warner Bros./courtesy Everett Collection)

Why We Can’t Wait: The 2011 Watchmen movie (pictured) was the best possible movie it could be; though many, justifiably, see the flaws in trying to contain Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’s expansive 12-issue series into 2 hours and 43 minutes — or 3 hours and 35 minutes if you have the Ultimate Edition with the “Tales of the Black Freighter” sequence woven back in. Moore himself believes adapting the work into a dramatic format is a waste of resources. But if it must be adapted, television was always the natural home for a story which spans generations, four Nixon administrations, and the time it takes Dr. Manhattan to decide life is special. Lost’s Damon Lindelof is developing the series for HBO, which could be a good thing for the characters, as long as he doesn’t send Nite Owl to a deserted island. Then again, there is a tropical island in the comic book, but the reasons why people end up there are eventually explained.

Debuting: TBD


New Warriors

Marvel's New Warriors (Freeform)

Why We Can’t Wait: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl (Milana Vayntrub) and the rest of the New Warriors face being superheroes and other crises of early adulthood in a comedy series originally developed for Freeform. Unfortunately, Marvel took the series back from the cable channel in November when it couldn’t guarantee a 2018 premiere date. Marvel has been looking for a new home ever since. There has been no mention of the program in months, leading many to wonder if it is dead or being held in reserve for the eventual Disney-branded streaming platform. Hopefully, we’ll get to see Squirrel Girl and Mister Immortal (Craig Hollis) on our screens very soon.

Debuting: TBD


Metropolis (DC Streaming Service)

Metropolis (DC Entertainment)

Why We Can’t Wait: Like Gotham, the excitement is in how you do a series set in a superhero’s world before he arrives on the scene. And that’s exactly what the DC streaming service plans to do with Metropolis, a television show centered on Lois Lane and her friend Lex Luthor as they investigate the strange goings-on around the “City of Tomorrow” and discovering its penchant for unhinged science. Like the magic trick Gotham pulled with the Penguin (Robin Lord Taylor), the intriguing element here would be the depiction of Lois and Lex, especially if they take the route Gotham took and stop worrying about the hero-in -waiting. Mix in city stalwarts like Professor Hamilton, Inspector Henderson, Perry White, Jimmy Olson, and Steve Lombard, and you have the beginnings of a good cast. The tough part: finding some villains if Lex is currently on the side of the angels.

Debuting: TBD


Cursed (Netflix)

Frank Miller in 2016 (Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Samsung)

Why We Can’t Wait: Based on a forthcoming illustrated novel by Tom Wheeler and Frank Miller (pictured), Cursed will take a new look at Nimue, the mythic Lady of the Lake. Recast as a “a teenage heroine with a mysterious gift” who must ally with a mercenary named Arthur to deliver a sword to the reclusive Merlyn, the novel and television show promise to look at the Arthur legend from a very different set of eyes. While not exactly a comic book, Miller’s presence lends it a certain cachet, particularly if the show uses his renderings to create its look, à la Sin City and 300.

Debuting: TBD


Deadly Class (Syfy)

Deadly Class Vol. 1 (Image Comics

(Photo by Image Comics)

Why We Can’t Wait: Based on the comic book by Rick Remender and Wes Craig, Deadly Class is set at an assassins academy filled with the children of mobsters and murderers. Marcus Lopez (Benjamin Wadsworth in the Syfy pilot), a kid from the streets with a lot of issues to address, finds himself accepted to the academy and faces all the trials of adolescence and ninja school. Socially awkward, but morally centered, Marcus must maintain his moral code while surviving a ruthless curriculum, vicious social cliques, and his own adolescent uncertainties. It sounds like a lot of fun should Syfy pick it up.

Debuting: TBD


American Flagg!

American Flagg!: Definitive Collection (Dynamite)

(Photo by Dynamite)

Why We Can’t Wait: Published by First Comics in 1983, the Howard Chaykin series centered on Reuben Flagg, a former comedian and television star turned Ranger for a corporate and government consortium known as the Plex. Once assigned to the Chicago Plexmall, he begins to see that his views of the United States may not align with the reality the remaining corporate entities put in place. Though mainly meant as a laugh, the series was quite prescient in its vision of 21st-century America. Which means the show could be a vicious send-up of today or a grim and gritty tale of a future gone wrong. The American Flagg series is being developed by EuropaCorp TV Studios and has to potential to be something really special should any broadcaster or streaming platform have the stomach for it.

Debuting: TBD


Astro City

Astro City (Vertigo)

(Photo by Vertigo)

Why We Can’t Wait: Though Astro City is a long way off — it was only announced two weeks ago — we definitely cannot wait to see Kurt Busiek’s long-running series become a television series. Debuting as an Image Comics title created by Busiek, Brent Anderson, and Alex Ross in 1995, the series of loosely connected story arcs spans 16 collected volumes containing thousands of characters. The stories explore the lives of ordinary people, the all-too-human superhumans in their midst, and their collective, daily struggle to hold on to hope in the face of world-shaking, life-altering events beyond any single individual’s control. The series, which later moved to Vertigo, has the potential to tell superhero stories for a decade while introducing characters who will endear themselves to viewers. Provided, of course, the production can find a broadcast partner willing to shepherd it to success.

Debuting: TBD

Bryan Cranston in Breaking Bad; Finn Jones in Iron Fist keyart; Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss) - Mad Men - Season 2 (AMC/courtesy Everett Collection; Netflix; Frank Ockenfels/AMC)

(Photo by AMC/courtesy Everett Collection; Netflix; Frank Ockenfels/AMC)

Great new shows leave critics and fans clamoring for their second seasons, but new series don’t always deliver when they return for round two – many suffer the dreaded sophomore slump.

That’s not the case with these titles — in fact, just the opposite. We’ve pulled together a list of TV series that enjoyed the biggest sophomore bumps between season 1 and season 2, according to our Tomatometer. To ensure a fair accounting of opinion, we only included series with at least 20 reviews determining their scores in both their first and second seasons (you could find, if you dug deep, shows with bigger season-on-season improvements, but the pool of reviews would be pretty shallow).

A few of the shows here weren’t very good to begin with, so any improvement is noticeable, but others started strong and managed to get even stronger by their second seasons.

Some of the most prestigious titles in television turned up — hello, Breaking Bad and Mad Men — but the series with the biggest bump of all is Marvel’s Iron Fist on Netflix, which on Friday releases season 2. The second season has a 58% Tomatometer score (updated) from 45 reviews, giving the title a 40% bump between its first and second seasons. The next biggest bump was for Fox’s Human Target, which experienced a 26% jump between season 1 and 2.

Read on to see which other titles were competing with Marvel’s Iron Fist bump.

Updated on February 24, 2019 to reflect season score changes.


15. Narcos: Season 1 (2015) 78% | Narcos: Season 2 (2016) 93%

UP 13%

The show: The first two seasons centered on Steve Murphy (Boyd Holbrook) and Javier Pena (Pedro Pascal)’s pursuit of notorious druglord Pablo Escobar (Wagner Moura).

The ratings: Netflix won’t say, but they’re still producing the show, this week announcing that the fourth season, set in Mexico, will premiere November 16. Season 3 tackled the Cali cartel.

What improved: Season 2 was building up to the death of Escobar. Screenrant’s Kevin Yeoman wrote, “By streamlining the narrative into a compelling manhunt that makes far better use of actors like Pascal and Holbrook, while still giving Moura room to shine, Narcos has definitely improved in season 2.” AV Club’s Joshua Alston wrote, “Even with less ground to cover, Narcos is pleasantly dense and steadily introduces intriguing new characters to fill its impending power vacuum and firm up the show’s historicity.”


14. The Good Wife: Season 1 (2009) 83% | The Good Wife: Season 2 (2010) 96%

UP 13%

The show: Alicia Florrick (Julianna Margulies) stands by her husband (Chris Noth) when he admits to an affair, and ultimately becomes a successful lawyer with a complicated love life of her own.

The ratings: It was a juggernaut from the beginning by modern broadcast standards. The first two seasons each averaged 13 million viewers and only dipped slightly below 11 million by the end. Spin-off The Good Fight is still going on CBS All Access.

What Improved: The supporting cast became every bit as important as Margulies. Many critics lauded Archie Panjabi for her role as in-house law firm investigator Kalinda Sharma, while USA Today’s Roberto Bianco singled out another: “Wife has expanded its reach to envelop all of its well-acted main characters, a growing stable that now includes Alan Cumming‘s Eli Gold (a great addition).” The show also rewarded viewers who watched every episode making it a worthwhile investment. EW’s Ken Tucker wrote, “The Good Wife is so layered with previous-episode details that are never forgotten that it already has its own sort of mythology.”


13. Mad Men: Season 1 (2007) 85% | Mad Men: Season 2 (2008) 100%

UP 16%

The show: Hard-drinking, womanizing ad man Don Draper (Jon Hamm) tries to survive the ’60s while times change around him; meanwhile, female employees Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss) and Joan Holloway (Christina Hendricks) rise through the ranks.

The ratings: After a strong premiere to 1.65 million viewers, season 1 averaged 900,000. It nearly doubled for season 2 as the show’s acclaim made AMC a major player in cable originals.

What Improved: Critics caught on that Mad Men was a slow burn. TV Guide’s Matt Roush said, “Mad Men sizzles, simmering with erotic tension and crackling with cynical wit.” Alan Sepinwall, then with the Newark Star-Ledger, wrote, “as with a great baseball game, the leisurely pace gives you more time to marinate in the details.”


12. You're the Worst: Season 1 (2014) 82% | You're the Worst: Season 2 (2015) 97%

UP 16%

The show: Gretchen (Aya Cash) and Jimmy (Chris Geere) are both dysfunctional, but they may be perfect for each other. Their friends Lindsay (Kether Donohue) and Edgar (Desmin Borges) may be on their own.

The ratings: Season 1 only averaged 300,000 viewers on FX, so they moved it over to FXX where season 2’s 200,000 was just fine. The show will wrap up in its fifth season next year.

What Improved: Season 2 went deeper into the characters’ psychological issues like Gretchen’s depression. Critics appreciated the frank portrayal of delicate subjects. GQ’s Joshua Rivera praised “the way it handles a sobering character arc while remaining one of the sharpest comedies around.” And like life, You’re the Worst’s problems can’t be solved in 22 minutes. “It resists learning the lesson that each installment would seem to set out to teach its characters,” wrote TV Fanatic’s Caralynn Lippo. The show hits 100% in seasons 3 and 4.


11. Enlightened: Season 1 (2011) 79% | Enlightened: Season 2 (2013) 96%

UP 16%

The show: Amy Jellicoe (Laura Dern) visits a mental-health retreat after she suffers an epic breakdown at the office. When she returns, she is reassigned to the company’s basement operations with other corporate misfits.

The ratings: Enlightened was never a ratings juggernaut for HBO. The first season barely averaged 170,000 viewers. Season 2 jumped up to 250,000.

What Improved: The show connected with the viewers who saw it, but its season 2 critical surge ultimately couldn’t save it. Alternet’s Eileen Jones said, “Unleash Amy and watch the endless repercussions in unsparing detail and laugh sardonically at your own stumbling way through the poisoned world.” Francine Prose of the New York Review of Books marveled at the strength of the show’s characters, especially “how much of ourselves we may see in them, if we only have the temerity to allow it.”


10. Halt and Catch Fire: Season 1 (2014) 76% | Halt and Catch Fire: Season 2 (2015) 91%

UP 17%

The show: The early days of the computer business were full of drama for Joe (Lee Pace) and Gordon (Scoot McNairy). But by season 2, the show became more about Cameron (Mackenzie Davis) and Donna (Kerry Bishe) developing online games.

The ratings: Season 1 averaged 750,000 viewers. Season 2 was down a tad to half a million, but the show held on for four seasons on AMC.

What improved: Turns out software is more dramatic than hardware, and focusing on the women helped. “The fact that two young women are bossing the enterprise gives it an added piquancy,” Globe and Mail’s John Doyle wrote, while Andy Greenwald wrote in Grantland, “Its inversion of decades of prestige-drama gender convention seems painfully obvious, and yet I’m not sure if any other show has actually attempted it.”


9. The Magicians: Season 1 (2016) 74% | The Magicians: Season 2 (2017) 91%

UP 17%

The show: Harry Potter for twentysomethings, the series takes place in a secret magic academy, where young adults learn how to practice the magic they only read about in storybooks.

The ratings: The Magicians averages 750,000 viewers on Syfy with a high of a solid million for the second season premiere. It’s still going with a fourth season on the way.

What Improved: The second season gave fans more of what they wanted: more sex, bad behavior, witty banter, and whimsical magic, but with higher emotional stakes, too. Black Girl Nerds’ Kyndal Wilson wrote, “There is no truer statement than ‘more magic, more problems.’ If you’re already a fan of the show, you won’t want to miss this.” Screenrant’s Molly Freeman called it “another season focused on the darker, more cynical side to magic grounded in the whimsy of the show’s characters.”


8. Breaking Bad: Season 1 (2008) 86% | Breaking Bad: Season 2 (2009) 97%

UP 17%

Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) and Walter White (Bryan Cranston) - Breaking Bad _Season 5 - Photo Credit: Frank Ockenfels/AMC

(Photo by )

The show: After a cancer diagnosis, high school teacher Walter White (Bryan Cranston) becomes the crystal meth cook Heisenberg with his partner Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), to the chagrin of his wife Skyler (Anna Gunn).

The ratings: As AMC’s follow-up original series to Mad Men, Breaking Bad started out modestly. Its first two seasons averaged 1.5 million viewers. It wasn’t until after season 3 that people started binging and catching up to follow the saga as it aired.

What Improved: Season 1 was only seven episodes, so it was just getting started. Season 2 may have been when critic Alan Sepinwall decided it was a modern classic, writing, “This brilliant second season of Breaking Bad is starting to earn a place in any discussion of the classics of the genre.” Sepinwall would go on to write a book on the series, Breaking Bad 101. Newsday’s Verne Gay also accurately predicted the show’s Emmy dominance saying, “if the rest of the season matches Sunday’s premiere, an Emmy nomination for best drama seems certain.”


7. Hannibal: Season 1 (2013) 82% | Hannibal: Season 2 (2014) 98%

UP 17%


The show: Hannibal Lecter (Mads Mikkelsen) works with Will Graham (Hugh Dancy) to help the FBI catch serial killers. Fans of films Red DragonThe Silence of the Lambs, and Hannibal and the novels of the same name by author Thomas Harris know, of course, that Hannibal the Cannibal is the most evil one of all.

The ratings: NBC gave series creator Fuller three seasons to tell the story, at least up through the end of the Red Dragon story line. Season 1 dropped from just over 4 million viewers to just below 3 million. The ratings didn’t improve in season 2, but those who kept watching agree that the show did.

What Improved: Fuller rewarded loyal viewers, never compromising the series’ artistic sensibility or explicit gore to try to win new fans. Critics, at least, noticed the level at which Fuller was working; TV Guide’s Matt Roush said, “[It] is a feast of macabre freakishness, going beyond the realm of guilty pleasure in a sustained nightmare of horrific yet elegantly hypnotic design.” Slate’s Willa Paskin marveled, “Somehow it has become an engrossing, psychologically dense show that is also visually stunning.”


6. () % | The Expanse: Season 2 (2017) 95%

UP 18%

The show: Based on the James S. A. Corey novels, the trio of U.N. executive Chrisjen Avasaraia (Shohreh Aghdashloo), detective Joseph Miller (Thomas Jane), and captain Jim Holden (Steven Strait) combat espionage and hostile alien technology in the colonized solar system.

The ratings: Ratings for the expensive sci-fi series went from 700,000 viewers in season 1 to half a million in season 2 on Syfy. The network ordered a third season, but then cancelled the show. Fans rejoiced when Amazon founder, president, and CEO Jeff Bezos announced that the company’s premium streaming service will distribute the fourth.

What Improved: With a whole solar system, you can imagine there’s a lot of ground for the first season to cover. Those who stuck with it were rewarded with more focused storytelling.“Unburdened with introductory world building and backed by surefooted writing, The Expanse returns as thrilling and intriguing as ever,”  We Got This Covered’s Mitchel Broussard wrote. Indiewire’s Liz Shannon Miller said, “There’s more focus to the first four episodes of the season than expected, thanks to more of the characters uniting in proximity to similar goals.”


5. Penny Dreadful: Season 1 (2014) 80% | Penny Dreadful: Season 2 (2015) 100%

UP 20%

The show: Famous characters from horror literature team up to save Victorian London from monsters, including Victor Frankenstein (Harry Treadaway), Dorian Gray (Reeve Carney), and Van Helsing (David Warner) with American gunslinger Ethan Chandler (Josh Hartnett) and the haunted Vanessa Ives (Eva Green) added to the mix.

The ratings: Season 1 averaged 750,000 viewers for Showtime. Season 2 dropped to about half a million, but surged back by the season finale. The series got a third season, but the season finale ended with “The End,” though Showtime never announced that the show was cancelled.

What Improved: Season 2 didn’t offer a jumping-in point, according to New York Daily News’s David Hinckley, but “it should nicely satisfy those who hopped onto the ride last year.” Salon’s Sonia Saraiya wrote, “If anything, the return from hiatus has shifted Penny Dreadful into even higher gear.”


4. Sense8: Season 1 (2015) 72% | Sense8: Season 2 (2016) 93%

UP 22%

The show: Eight people around the world discover they are linked by extraordinary mental abilities and must team up to survive being hunted by Whispers.

The ratings: Even though Netflix does not release ratings, the streaming service clearly wasn’t happy with the performance of the second season, because the series was cancelled. There were enough passionate fans demanding more Sense8, however, that Netflix agreed to a finale movie, but the Wachowski siblings and J. Michael Straczynski had a five-season plan for this story.

What Improved: The Wachoskis’ bold new mythology takes a while to explain, but patient viewers are rewarded, according to Indiewire’s Liz Shannon Miller, who wrote, “Sense8 may have had a slow start in season 1, but season 2 is a hell of a ride.” The Washington Post’s Sonia Roo wrote that she was just getting into the characters: “Sense8 avoids tokenizing its characters, which involves giving each sensate a full backstory that helps viewers understand what motivates them.”


3. The Newsroom: Season 1 (2012) 48% | The Newsroom: Season 2 (2013)

UP 22%

The show: After a breakdown, newsman Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) tries to redeem himself while working under ex-girlfriend MacKenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer), while young producers Jim Harper (John Gallagher Jr.) and Maggie Jordan (Alison Pill) try to prove themselves.

The ratings: Creator Aaron Sorkin’s opinionated dramatization of real news stories from recent history polarized audiences and critics, and seasons 1 and 2 hovered around 2 million viewers. Sorkin, who also created acclaimed NBC White House drama The West Wing, decided to end his HBO series after its third season.

What Improved: Sorkin won over some Rotten reviews to Fresh in the second season, like LA Times’ Mary McNamara and People’s Tom Giliatto. A few critics posting negative reviews for season 1 simply didn’t come back to review the second season, like Wall Street Journal’s Dorothy Rabinowitz and Time’s James Poniewozik, which also gave Fresh reviews more weight in season 2’s score.


2. Human Target: Season 1 (2010) 62% | Human Target: Season 2 (2010) 88%

UP 26%

Human Target promo art (Fox)

(Photo by Fox)

The show: Based on the DC Comic, Christopher Chance (Mark Valley) keeps his clients safe by making himself the target.

The ratings: A lead-in from American Idol, the action series brought a lot of eyeballs to season 1, though its initial audience of 10 million viewers dropped. By season 2 it was only getting six million, not enough for Fox to give it a third season.

What Improved: If viewers had listened to the critics, they might have known that Human Target really brought it in season 2, adding Indira Varma and Janet Montgomery as two strong female characters. That sold What Culture’s Dan Owen on season 2, writing, “The inclusion of two strong women is an obvious but welcome change to Human Target‘s dynamic.” For HollywoodChicago’s Brian Tallerico, season 2’s changes should have made it must-see TV: “Human Target seems to be taking itself more seriously in season 2, trying to add the emotional weight that might have kept it from becoming a water-cooler hit last season.”


1. Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 1 (2017) 20% | Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 2 (2018) 55%

Up 40%


The show: After studying Kung Fu in Asia, Danny Rand (Finn Jones) returns to New York, where he fights crime as the superhero Iron Fist.

The ratings: Netflix does not release ratings, but it’s no secret that season 1 of Iron Fist was a bust. Fans and critics complained about the choppy editing (kind of a problem when showcasing his super power requires badass fight scenes), its slow pace, and derivative echoes of other origin stories.

What Improved: Praise of season 2 credits the show with hearing those complaints and addressing them. TVLine’s Matt Mitovich said in his Rotten review, “Iron Fist season 2 marks an improvement over its well-derided freshman run, but still lacks punch,” while Den of Geek’s Mike Cecchini said in his Fresh review, “A new showrunner, a new fight coordinator… all help tremendously, along with better villains, a more focused story, and a willingness to put the show’s supporting cast to better use.”


Want more?

Here are titles 16-30 of series measured by Tomatometer whose scores increased most between seasons 1 and 2 and the size of their bumps:

16. The Leftovers – 12%
17. American Horror Story – 11%
18. The Knick – 10%
19. The Good Place – 9%
20. Love – 9%
21. The Americans – 9%
22. How to Get Away With Murder – 8%
23. Masters of Sex – 8%
24. Pushing Daisies – 8%
25. Bates Motel – 7%
26. Justified – 7%
27. The Sinner – 7%
28. Game of Thrones – 6%
29. The Missing – 6%
30. Rectify – 5%

Game of Thrones - Dragonstone (Macall B. Polay/HBO)

(Photo by Macall B. Polay/HBO)

Eager for warm weather already? Here’s an early look at spring/summer TV that might argue for you to stay indoors.


March | April | May | JuneJuly | AugustNEW! Fall 2017


March


Wednesday, Mar. 1
National Treasure: Season 1 (2016) 100% Hulu
Chicago Justice: Season 1 (2017) 73% 10 p.m., NBC (preview)

Thursday, Mar. 2
60 Days In: Atlanta (2017) 9 p.m., A&E

Friday, Mar. 3
Annedroids: Season 4 (2016) Amazon

Sunday, Mar. 5
Once Upon a Time: Season 6 (2016) 89% 8 p.m., ABC (returning)
Making History: Season 1 (2010) 92% 8:30 p.m., FOX
Chicago Justice: Season 1 (2017) 73% 9 p.m., NBC
The Last Man on Earth: Season 3 (2016) 78% 9:30 p.m., FOX (returning)
The Arrangement: Season 1 (2010) 62% 10 p.m., E!
Blood Feuds: Bette and Joan (2016) 91% 10 p.m., FX
Shades of Blue: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., NBC
Time After Time: Season 1 (2017) 67% 10 pm., ABC
Breaking Free (2015) 11 p.m., WGN

Trial & Error

Tuesday, Mar. 7
The Americans: Season 5 (2017) 94% 10 p.m., FX

Wednesday, Mar. 8
Designated Survivor: Season 1 (2016) 87% 10 p.m., ABC (returning)
Underground: Season 2 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., WGN
Ripper Street: Season 5 (2016) 100% 11 p.m., BBC America

Thursday, Mar. 9
Kicking & Screaming: Season 1 (2017) 9 p.m., FOX
The Catch: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., ABC

Friday, Mar. 10
Buddy Thunderstruck: Season 1 (2017) , Netflix
Hand of God: Season 2 (2017) Amazon
Love: Season 2 (2017) 96% Netflix

Saturday, Mar. 11
Samurai Jack: Season 5 (2017) 100% 11:30 p.m., Cartoon Network

Sunday, Mar. 12
Top Gear: Season 24 (2017) 86% 8 p.m., BBC America
American Crime: Season 3 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., ABC

Monday, Mar. 13
Young & Hungry: Season 5 (2017) 8 p.m., Freeform
Baby Daddy: Season 6 (2017) 8:30 p.m., Freeform

Tuesday, Mar. 14
Trial & Error: Season 1 (2017) 86% 9:30 p.m., NBC

Wednesday, Mar. 15
Greenleaf: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., OWN
() % 10 p.m., Sundance

Thursday, Mar. 16
Shrink: Season 1 (2017) Seeso
Snatch: Season 1 (2017) 42% Crackle
Review: Season 3 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., Comedy Central

Marvel's Iron Fist

Marvel’s Iron Fist

Friday, Mar. 17
The Originals: Season 4 (2017) 100% 8 p.m., The CW
Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 1 (2017) 20% 8 p.m., Netflix
Animals.: Season 2 (2017) 100% 11:30 p.m., HBO

Sunday, Mar. 19
The Circus: Inside the Biggest Story on Earth: Season 2 (2017) 8 p.m., Showtime
Into the Badlands: Season 2 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., AMC

Tuesday, Mar. 21
Cosplay Melee: Season 1 (2017)   10 p.m., SyFy
Upscale With Prentice Penny: Season 1 (2017)   10 p.m., TruTV

Wednesday, Mar. 22
Shots Fired: Season 1 (2017) 84% 8 p.m., FOX
Empire: Season 3 (2016) 87% 9 p.m., FOX (returning)
Rogue: Season 3 (2015) 9 p.m., DirecTV

Ingobernable

Friday, Mar. 24
Grace and Frankie: Season 3 (2017) 100% Netflix
Ingobernable: Season 1 (2017)  Netflix (US premiere)
() % 7:30 p.m., DIS

Tuesday, Mar. 28
Rebel: Season 1 (2017) 38% 10 p.m., BET

Wednesday, Mar. 29
Harlots: Season 1 (2017) 92% Hulu
Imaginary Mary: Season 1 (2017) 27% 8:30 p.m., ABC (sneak preview)
Nobodies: Season 1 () 73% 10 p.m., TV Land
Lopez: Season 2 (2017) 10:30 p.m., TV Land

Friday, Mar. 31
13 Reasons Why: Season 1 (2017) 77% Netflix
Five Came Back: Miniseries (2017) 98% Netflix
Robert Klein Still Can't Stop His Leg (2016) 100% 10 p.m., Starz

Back to Top


April


Sunday, Apr. 2
Call the Midwife: Season 6 (2017) 8 p.m., PBS
Home Fires: Season 2 (2016) 9 p.m., PBS
Your Pretty Face Is Going to Hell: Season 3 (2016) 11:30 p.m., Cartoon Network (returning)

Tuesday, Apr. 4
Dimension 404: Season 1 (2017) 80% Hulu
iZombie: Season 3 (2017) 100% 8 p.m., CW
Prison Break: Season 5 (2017) 56% 9 p.m., FOX
Imaginary Mary: Season 1 (2017) 27% 9:30 p.m., ABC

Wednesday, Apr. 5
Archer: Dreamland (2017) 86% 10 p.m., FXX
Brockmire: Season 1 (2017) 94% 10 p.m., IFC

Thursday, Apr, 6
Dark Net: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., Showtime

Friday, Apr. 7
American Playboy: The Hugh Hefner Story: Season 1 (2017) 53% Amazon
The Get Down: Season 1 (2016) 77% Netflix (returning)

The Son

Saturday, Apr. 8
The Son: Season 1 (2017) 52% 9 p.m., AMC

Monday, Apr. 10
Better Call Saul: Season 3 (2017) 98% 10 p.m., AMC
Angie Tribeca: Season 3 (2017) 100% 10:30 p.m., TBS

Tuesday, Apr. 11
Brooklyn Nine-Nine: Season 4 (2016) 100% 8 p.m., FOX (returning)

Wednesday, Apr. 12
Hollywood Darlings: Season 1 () 8 p.m., POP
Return of the Mac: Season 1 (2017) 8:30 p.m., POP

Friday, Apr. 14
Chelsea: Season 2 (2017) Netflix
Fortitude: Season 2 (2017) 91% Amazon
Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Return: Season 1 (2017) 100% Netflix

Saturday, Apr. 15
Doctor Who: Season 10 (2017) 88% 9 p.m., BBC America
Class: Season 1 (2016) 84% 10 p.m., BBC America

Sunday, Apr. 16
The White Princess: Season 1 (2017) 76% 8 p.m., Starz
Guerrilla: Miniseries (2017) 75% 9 p.m., Showtime
The Leftovers: Season 3 (2017) 99% 9 p.m., HBO
Veep: Season 6 (2017) 94% 10:30 p.m., HBO

famousinlove_y1_featuredimage_141855_0517-936x482

Famous in Love

Tuesday, Apr. 18
Pretty Little Liars: Season 7 (2016) 78% 8 p.m., Freeform (returning)
Famous in Love: Season 1 (2017) 60% 9 p.m., Freeform

Wednesday, Apr. 19
Fargo: Season 3 (2017) 93% 10 p.m., FX

Friday, Apr. 21
Bill Nye Saves the World: Season 1 (2017) 75% Netflix
Bosch: Season 3 (2017) 100% Amazon
Girlboss: Season 1 (2017) 35% Netflix
Thunderbirds Are Go: Season 3 (2017) Amazon

Sunday, Apr. 23
El Chapo: Season 1 (2017) 8 p.m., Univision
Silicon Valley: Season 4 (2017) 94% 10 p.m., HBO
Mary Kills People: Season 1 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., Lifetime

Monday, Apr. 24
Gotham: Season 3 (2016) 74% 8 p.m., Fox (returning)

Genius

Tuesday, Apr. 25
Genius: Einstein (2017) 84% 9 p.m., National Geographic
Great News: Season 1 (2017) 76% 9 p.m., NBC

Wednesday, Apr. 26
The Handmaid's Tale: Season 1 (2017) 94% Hulu
Gomorrah: Season 2 (2016) 80% 10 p.m., Sundance

Thursday, Apr. 27
The President Show: Season 1 (2017) 67% 11:30 p.m., Comedy Central

Friday, Apr. 28
Casting JonBenét (2017) 82% Netflix
Dear White People: Season 1 (2017) 95% Netflix
Catastrophe: Season 3 (2017) 100% Amazon
Let It Fall: Los Angeles 1982-1992 (2017) 100% 9 p.m., ABC

American Gods

Sunday, Apr. 30
American Gods: Season 1 (2017) 92% 9 p.m., Starz

Back to Top


May


Monday, May 1
Lucifer: Season 2 (2016) 100% 9 p.m., Fox (returning)

Friday, May 5
Sense8: Season 2 (2016) 93% Netflix

Monday, May 8
Southern Charm Savannah: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., Bravo

Friday, May 12
Anne With an E: Season 1 (2017) 83% Netflix
I Love Dick: Season 1 (2017) 87% Amazon
Master of None: Season 2 (2017) 100% Netflix

Sunday, May 14
Mike Tyson Mysteries: Season 3 (2017) 11:30 p.m., Cartoon Network

Monday, May 15
Decline and Fall: Season 1 () 91% Acorn
Year Million: Season 1 (2017)  9 p.m., Nat Geo

Tuesday, May 16
Born This Way: Season 3 (2017) 9 p.m., A&E

Wednesday, May 17
I Am Heath Ledger (2017) 86% Netflix
Downward Dog: Season 1 (2017) 85% 9:30 ABC

Friday, May 19
The Keepers: Miniseries () 97% Netflix
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Season 3 (2017) 97% Netflix
12 Monkeys: Season 3 (2017) 100% 8 p.m., SyFY

Sunday, May 21
Dark Angel (2017) 9 p.m., PBS
The Return: The Return (2017) 94% 9 p.m., Showtime

Casual

Tuesday, May 23
Casual: Season 3 (2017) 100% Hulu

Wednesday, May 24
Dirty Dancing (2017) 19% 8 p.m., ABC

Love Connection

Thursday, May 25
Love Connection: Season 1 (2017) 8 p.m., FOX
Beat Shazam: Season 1 (2017) 9 p.m., FOX

Friday, May 26
Gap Year: Season 1 (2017) Hulu
Bloodline: Season 3 (2017) 53% Netflix

Monday, May 29
Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath: Season 2 (2017) 9 p.m., A&E
Whose Line is it Anyway?: Season 5 (2017) 9 p.m., CW
Still Star-Crossed: Season 1 (2017) 52% 10 p.m., ABC

Tuesday, May 30
F Is for Family: Season 2 (2017) 89% Netflix
House of Cards: Season 5 (2017) 72% Netflix
Animal Kingdom: Season 2 (2017) 80% 9 p.m., TNT
Fear Factor: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., MTV
World of Dance: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., NBC

Wednesday, May 31
() % 8 p.m., DirecTV
MasterChef: Season 8 (2017) 8 p.m., FOX
The Carmichael Show: Season 3 (2017) 89% 9 p.m., NBC
The F Word With Gordon Ramsay: Season 1 (2017) 9 p.m., FOX

Back to Top


June


Thursday, June 1
Nashville: Season 5 (2017) 86% 9 p.m., CMT (returning)

Friday, June 2
Flaked: Season 2 (2017) Netflix
Long Strange Trip: Season 1 (2017) Amazon

Sunday, June 4
Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly: Season 1 (2017) 7 p.m., NBC
Fear the Walking Dead: Season 3 (2017) 84% 9 p.m., AMC
I'm Dying Up Here: Season 1 (2017) 51% 10 p.m., Showtime

Monday, June 5
Shadowhunters: Season 2 (2017) 86% 8 p.m., Freeform (returning)
Stitchers: Season 3 (2017) 9 p.m., Freeform

Wednesday, June 7
Nightcap: Season 2 (2017) 8 p.m., POP

Thursday, June 8
Queen of the South: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., USA

Friday, June 9
Orange Is the New Black: Season 5 (2017) 71% Netflix
Dark Matter: Season 3 (2017) 100% 8 p.m., SyFy
Wynonna Earp: Season 2 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., SyFy

Orphan Black

Saturday, June 10
Idiotsitter: Season 2 (2017) 8 p.m., Comedy Central
Orphan Black: Season 5 (2017) 95% 10 p.m., BBC America

Sunday, June 11
American Grit: Season 1 (2016) 63% 9 p.m., FOX
Claws: Season 1 (2017) 82% 9 p.m., TNT

Monday, June 12
So You Think You Can Dance: Season 14 (2017) 8 p.m., FOX
Superhuman: Season 1 (2017) 9 p.m., FOX

Tuesday, June 13
Face Off: Season 12 (2017) 9 p.m., SyFy

Wednesday, June 14
Blood Drive: Season 1 (2017) 76% 10 p.m., SyFy

Thursday, June 15
The Tunnel: Season 2 (2017) 9 p.m., PBS

Friday, June 16
The Ranch: Season 2 (2016) 67% Netflix
Cardinal: Season 1 (2017) 89% Hulu

Sunday, June 18
Grantchester: Season 3 (2017) 9 p.m., PBS

Tuesday, June 20
Queen Sugar: Season 2 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., OWN
Wrecked: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., TBS

Thursday, June 22
The Mist: Season 1 (2017) 60% 10 p.m., Spike
The Night Shift: Season 4 (2017) 10 p.m., NBC

Glow

Friday, June 23
Free Reign: Season 1 (2017) Netflix
GLOW: Season 1 (2017) 94% Netflix
Playing House: Season 3 (2017) 100% 11 p.m., USA

Sunday, June 25
Power: Season 4 (2017) Starz
Preacher: Season 2 (2017) 91% 9 p.m., AMC
Prime Suspect: Tennison: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., PBS

Wednesday, June 28
Okja (2017) 86% Netflix
Cleverman: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., Sundance
Younger: Season 3 (2016) 100% 10 p.m., TV Land

Thursday, June 29
Big Brother Season 19 (2017) 9 p.m., CBS
Zoo: Season 3 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., CBS

Friday, June 30
Gypsy: Season 1 (2017) 40% Netflix
Killjoys: Season 3 (2017) 8 p.m., SyFy
Masters of Illusion: Season 4 (2017) 8 p.m., CW

Back to Top


July


Wednesday, Jul. 5
Snowfall: Season 1 (2017) 62% FX 10 p.m., FX

Friday, Jul. 7
Degrassi: Next Class: Season 4 (2017) Netflix

Sunday, Jul. 9
Candy Crush: Season 1 (2017) 9 p.m., CBS
The Defiant Ones: Miniseries (2017) 100% 9 p.m., HBO
() 10 p.m., Spike

Monday, Jul. 10
Penn & Teller: Fool Us: Season 4 (2017)  8 p.m., CW
() % 9 p.m., TNT

Tuesday, Jul. 11
The Fosters: Season 5 (2017) 100% 8 p.m., Freeform
The Bold Type: Season 1 (2017) 93%, 9 p.m., Freeform
Still The King: Season 2 (2017) , 10 p.m., CMT
() %, 10:30 p.m., Fuse

Wednesday, Jul. 12
Salvation: Season 1 (2017) 45% 9 p.m., CBS
Suits: Season 7 (2017) 93%, 9 p.m., USA
I'm Sorry: Season 1 (2017) 75% 10 p.m., TruTV
Odd Mom Out: Season 3 (2017) 10 p.m., Bravo

Thursday, Jul. 13
Hooten and the Lady: Miniseries (2016) 75% 9 p.m., CW
Season 6, Season 6, Episode 1: "" 8 p.m., ESPN

Friday, Jul. 14
Friends From College: Season 1 (2017) 26% Netflix

Game of Thrones - season 7 - Kit Harington as Jon Snow (Helen Sloan/HBO)

Sunday, Jul. 16
Game of Thrones: Season 7 (2017) 93% HBO
The Strain: Season 4 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., FX

Monday, Jul. 17
Loaded: Season 1 (2017) 60% 10 p.m., AMC

Tuesday, Jul. 18
Shooter: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., USA
Being Mary Jane: Season 4 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., BET

Friday, Jul. 21
() 8 p.m., ABC, Disney, DXD, Freeform, Lifetime
Last Chance U: EMCC: Part 2 (2017) 100% Netflix
Ozark: Season 1 (2017) 70% Netflix
Raven’s Home (2017) 10 p.m., Disney Channel

Saturday, Jul. 22
Cold Justice: Season 4 (2017) 8 p.m., Oxygen
() % 11 p.m., SyFy

Sunday, Jul. 23
Ballers: Season 3 (2017) 67% 10 p.m., HBO
Insecure: Season 2 (2017) 98% 10:30 p.m., HBO
Phelps vs. Shark: Great Gold vs. Great White (2017) 8 p.m., Discovery

Midnight, Texas

Monday, Jul. 24
Midnight, Texas: Season 1 (2017) 61% 10 p.m., NBC
Somewhere Between: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., ABC
People of Earth: Season 2 (2017) 10:30 p.m., TBS

Friday, Jul. 28
The Last Tycoon: Season 1 (2016) 45% Amazon
Room 104: Season 1 (2017) 87% 11:30 p.m., HBO

Sunday, Jul. 30
Top Gear America: Season 1 (2017) 8 p.m., BBC America
Teen Wolf: Season 6 (2016) 83% 8 p.m., MTV
Rick and Morty: Season 3 (2017) 96% Cartoon Network

Back to Top


August


Tuesday, Aug. 1
Manhunt: Unabomber (2017) 9 p.m., Discovery

Wednesday, Aug. 2
The Lowe Files (2017) 10 p.m., A&E
The Sinner: Season 1 (2017) 90% 10 p.m., USA

Thursday, Aug. 3
The Guest Book: Season 1 (2017) 64% 10 p.m., TBS
What Would Diplo Do? (2017) 10 p.m., Viceland

Friday, Aug. 4
Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later: Season 1 (2017) Netflix

Sunday, Aug. 6
Sharknado 5: Global Swarming (2017) 30% 8 p.m., Syfy
Ray Donovan: Season 5 (2017) 100% 9 p.m., Showtime
Life of Kylie (2017) 9 p.m., E!

Tuesday, Aug. 8
Difficult People: Season 3 (2017) 100% Hulu

Wednesday, Aug. 9
Mr. Mercedes (2017) 8 p.m., Audience Network

Thursday, Aug. 10
Saturday Night Live: Weekend Update: Season 1 (2017) 9 p.m., NBC

Friday, Aug. 11
Atypical: Season 1 (2017) 74% Netflix

Sunday, Aug. 13
Get Shorty: Season 1 (2017) 78% 10 p.m., Epix

Monday, Aug. 14
Bachelor in Paradise: Season 4 (2017) 33% 8 p.m., ABC

Tuesday, Aug. 15
Greenleaf: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., OWN

Wednesday, Aug. 16
Marlon: Season 1 (2017) 50% 9 p.m., NBC

Friday, Aug. 18
Marvel - The Defenders: Season 1 (2017) 78% Netflix

Saturday, Aug. 19
Halt and Catch Fire: Season 4 (2017) 100% 9 p.m., AMC

Sunday, Aug. 20
Endeavour: Season 4 (2017) 9 p.m., PBS
The Last Ship: Season 4 (2017) 9 p.m., TNT
Episodes: Season 5 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., Showtime
Survivor's Remorse: Season 4 (2017) 10 p.m., Starz
Dice: Season 2 (2017) 10:30 p.m., Showtime

Thursday, Aug. 24
Party Boat (2017) Crackle

Friday, Aug. 25
Disjointed: Season 1 (2017) 19% Netflix
The Tick: Season 1 (2016) 90% Amazon
Death Note (2017) 38% Netflix

Sunday, Aug. 27
()  8 p.m., Smithsonian
() 9 p.m., Smithsonian

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Iron Fist, the fourth Netflix series focusing on one of Marvel’s superhero troop the Defenders dropped on Friday, March 17 — and reactions have been a really mixed bag.

On Rotten Tomatoes, season 1 only reached an 18% Tomatometer score with critics (as of this writing). To compare to the other stand-alone Defenders shows, the first seasons of Daredevil, Jessica Jones, and Luke Cage all scored over 90 percent fresh. The second season of Daredevil dropped to a 76, but that’s still over four times the Iron Fist score.

Turning to the fans, Daredevil and Jessica Jones’ Audience Scores on RT are over 90% for all seasons, while Luke Cage sits at 85 and, despite having 2,000 or more user ratings than each of its Netflix comrades, Iron Fist brings up the rear at 83.

While the discrepancy isn’t nearly the same with viewers as it is with critics, there are still multiple and varied complaints that fans are levying against the fourth installment in the Defenders series of shows, which is making for some really fun social media posts.


On the serious side, there is a debate raging about the “whitewashing” of Iron Fist with the casting of curly-topped Game of Thrones alum Finn Jones, which is an interesting criticism, since the character has been Caucasian since his debut over 40 years ago — the argument is that in this day and age, he should have/could have been a person of color.


Adding fuel to the fire is former Marvel editor-in-chief Roy Thomas, who co-created Iron Fist in 1974 with artist Gil Kane, saying in an interview, “Don’t these people have something better to do than to worry about the fact that Iron Fist isn’t Oriental, or whatever word?”

But some fans still don’t have a problem with this particular issue.


On a more fun note, one of the biggest beefs fans have with Danny Rand is that he’s such a Burning Man dude-bro.

THIS IS IRON FIST – See this, folks? This incredible John Byrne illustration right here? THIS is the real Iron Fist….

Posted by David DeVenter on Thursday, March 23, 2017


Some fans are annoyed the show creators couldn’t get any more creative with the storyline, calling the show boring and unimaginative.

The elephant in the room.I just said to someone last week, while the story is indeed in keeping with Marvel canon…

Posted by Niama Safia Sandy on Wednesday, March 22, 2017


Even among people who generally like the show, the lack of good fight scenes is problematic.


Vidan Tran, Daniel Wu, Aaron Gassor in Into the Badlands (Carlos Serrao/AMC)

So, what’s a martial arts–TV fan to do? Some online commenters offered alternative viewing suggestions, including AMC’s Into the Badlands (pictured) and Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. on ABC.

I just watched 30 seconds of Into The Badlands that was better than two whole episodes of Iron Fist.

Posted by Jerry Barrow on Sunday, March 19, 2017


But despite all the complaints, there is still a very vocal contingent of viewers defending this Defender and his crew.

You guyz. Watch Marvel's Iron Fist. The reviews are being strange for some reason, but after episode 2, it gets fantastic and stays that way.

Posted by Micah Smith on Thursday, March 23, 2017


And hey, Iron Fist has at least one really famous fan.

Iron Fist is available to stream now on Netflix. Watch for more Iron Fist when Netflix debuts The Defenders later in 2017.


[socialpoll id=”2430646″]


This week at the movies, we have Disney’s latest live-action fairy tale (Beauty and the Beast, starring Emma Watson and Dan Stevens) and a really bad day at the office (The Belko Experiment, starring John Gallagher Jr. and Adria Arjona). What are the critics saying?


Beauty and the Beast (2017) 71%


If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. And if you do succeed? You can add a few new ingredients to the mix and try again anyway — as Disney’s ongoing streak of live-action remakes makes clear, the odds are pretty decent that you might hit another home run. With this weekend’s Beauty and the Beast, the studio is out to breathe fresh box-office life into the tale (as old as time) of a cursed prince whose castle becomes a young girl’s prison — and whose, ahem, beastly appearance hides a heart she can’t help falling for. With Bill Condon in the director’s chair, a cast that includes Emma Watson and Dan Stevens as the titular lovebirds, and some of the same songs that helped captivate audiences during the animated classic, all the ingredients seem to be there for another irresistible romance — and if this pass at the story doesn’t quite reach its predecessor’s lofty heights, critics say it gets close enough to make it worth a watch. Fans of Disney’s original Beauty may feel it suffers by beggaring comparisons to its predecessor, but if you haven’t seen that version — or can temper your expectations accordingly — this remake should make for a suitably sweet night out at the movies.


The Belko Experiment (2016) 54%


If you like your action (or your horror) high-concept, The Belko Experiment dangles what might seem like an irresistible premise: an office full of Americans working in Bogotá suddenly finds their building under lockdown — and under the command of mysterious figures demanding that they either kill their coworkers or be killed themselves. It’s a nifty setup, and one whose on- and offscreen pedigree suggests great things; with a script by James Gunn and a cast that includes John C. McGinley and Michael Rooker, the genre thrills should flow as freely as the B-movie gore. Unfortunately, that isn’t quite the case — critics say that while this isn’t exactly a failed Experiment, it’s neither as gonzo as it could be nor as smart as it thinks, which undermines its attempts at satire and makes it harder to enjoy as a straight-up action thriller. A mixed bag not without its moments, Belko could still be worth checking out… but unless you’re really into this stuff, it might be best to wait for the rental.


What’s New on TV

Trial & Error: Season 1 (2017) 86%

Trial & Error hilariously parodies the true-crime genre with consistent laughs, irreverently funny “stupid humor,” and animated characters who populate the show’s dependably entertaining narratives.


Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 1 (2017) 20%

Despite some promising moments, Iron Fist is weighed down by an absence of momentum and originality.


Also Opening This Week In Limited Release

  • Tickling Giants (2016) , a documentary about Egyptian political satirist Baseem Youssef‘s journey from heart surgeon to public figure, is at 100 percent.
  • Betting on Zero (2016) , a documentary probe of the multi-level marketing corporation Herbalife, is at 100 percent.
  • After the Storm (2016) , about a creatively adrift author at a crossroads with his estranged family, is at 97 percent.
  • The Devil's Candy (2015) , about a dream home that becomes a paranormal nightmare for an artist and his family, is at 92 percent.
  • Mean Dreams (2016) , starring Bill Paxton as a corrupt cop whose double dealings get tangled in his teenage daughter’s love life, is at 83 percent.
  • Frantz (2016) , about the unlikely bond that develops between a veteran and a young woman grieving over the death of her fiancé, is at 78 percent.
  • T2 Trainspotting (2017) , director Danny Boyle‘s belated sequel to the 1996 classic, is Certified Fresh at 74 percent.
  • Song to Song (2017) , a Terrence Malick drama about life and love among musicians in Austin, is at 56 percent.
  • They Call Me Jeeg (2015) , about a criminal on a quest for vengeance after obtaining superpowers in an accident, is at 50 percent.
  • Atomica (2017) , about a safety inspector who encounters strange goings-on at an isolated nuclear power plant, is at 14 percent.

Looking for some good TV to watch this week? Maybe a few Oscar nominees? Or possibly a solid thriller or two? We’ve even got a couple of good choices for the kids. Read on for the full list of choices available on the streaming services, as well as a few options for sale and rental on FandangoNOW.


New on Netflix

 

Love: Season 2 (2017) 96%

In this Netflix original comedy series, Gillian Jacobs and Paul Rust play a young couple experiencing the ups and downs of commitment in an adult relationship.

Available now on: Netflix


Halt and Catch Fire: Season 3 (2016) 96%

Lee Pace, Scoot McNairy, Mackenzie Davis, and Kerry Bishé star in AMC’s drama about the wild and wooly early days of the personal computer revolution.

Available now on: Netflix


Notes on Blindness (2016) 95%

This documentary chronicles the struggles of writer John Hull, who endured decades of gradually deteriorating eyesight until he became completely blind.

Available now on: Netflix


Million Dollar Baby (2004) 90%

Clint Eastwood’s multiple Oscar-winning sports drama follows a down-on-his-luck trainer (Eastwood) who reluctantly agrees to work with an aspiring female boxer (Hilary Swank) when her tenacity wins him over.

Available now on: Netflix


Coraline (2009) 90%

Laika Entertainment’s first stop motion animated feature film is an adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s children’s book about a young girl who discovers a secret door in her new home that leads to an alternate dimension.

Available 3/16 on Netflix


Pete's Dragon (2016) 88%

Oakes Fegley, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Robert Redford star in this remake of the Disney film about a young orphaned boy lost in the wild who befriends a dragon and tries to keep him secret from the local townsfolk.

Available now on: Netflix


Burning Sands (2017) 88%

Trevor Jackson and Alfre Woodard star in this drama about a pre-med student at a historically black college who pledges a fraternity and endures cruel and relentless bullying from his upperclassman brothers.

Available now on: Netflix


Coming Through the Rye (2015) 70%

This small drama is a period coming-of-age tale about a teenage boy in 1969 inspired by Cather in the Rye who embarks on a journey to track down author J.D. Salinger.

Available now on: Netflix


Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 1 (2017) 20%

The latest Netflix Marvel series centers on billionaire heir Danny Rand, who returns to New York after a long absence and fights crime with newly acquired martial arts powers.

Available 3/17 on: Netflix


New on Amazon Prime

 

The Handmaiden (2016) 95%

South Korean director Park Chan-wook’s period drama based on the Sarah Waters novel Fingersmith follows a young thief who is assigned by her boss to be the handmaiden for a wealthy Japanese aristocrat, with secret plans to defraud her of her fortune.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994) 96%

Terence Stamp, Hugo Weaving, and Guy Pearce star in this comedic drama about a transsexual woman and a pair of drag performers who travel across the Australian outback in a tour bus en route to a performance in a remote casino.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


10 Cloverfield Lane (2016) 90%

Mary Elizabeth Winstead and John Goodman star in this psychological thriller about a young woman who awakens after an apparent catastrophe to find herself locked in a bunker with a doomsday prophet who insists they’re in the last safe place on Earth.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


A Simple Plan (1998) 91%

Bill Paxton and Billy Bob Thornton star in Sam Raimi’s thriller about a pair of brothers who stumble across a plane crash and millions of dollars and decide to keep the money for themselves.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


What's Eating Gilbert Grape (1993) 90%

Johnny Depp and Leonardo DiCaprio star in this drama about a young man living in a small town who looks after his obese mother and mentally disabled brother.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) 89%

Tobe Hooper’s iconic chiller follows a group of friends on a road trip who are terrorized by a family of sadistic serial murderers.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Big Fan (2009) 86%

Patton Oswalt stars in this darkly comedic drama about a New York Giants superfan whose life unravels after a less than friendly public encounter with one of the team’s stars.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on FandangoNOW

 

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) 92%

Bette Davis and Joan Crawford star in this Oscar-winning psychological thriller about an actress who holds her paraplegic sister captive in her mansion and torments her. The film is notorious for highlighting the bitter Hollywood rivalry between its two stars.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Elle (2016) 91%

Isabelle Huppert earned an Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her work in this Paul Verhoeven thriller as a woman who is raped by a masked assailant, manages to track him down, and engages him in a dangerous game of cat-and-mouse.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


20th Century Women (2016) 88%

Annette Bening, Greta Gerwig, and Elle Fanning star in Mike Mills’ semi-autobiographical Oscar-nominated drama about a bohemian single mother who raises her teenage son with the help of the eccentric tenants living in her house.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


A Monster Calls (2016) 86%

Lewis MacDougall, Felicity Jones, and Sigourney Weaver star in J.A. Bayona’s adaptation of a YA novel about a boy who encounters a monstrous talking tree (voiced by Liam Neeson) outside his bedroom window when his mother falls gravely ill.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Pi (1998) 88%

Darren Aronofsky’s breakout feature follows a tortured computer genius who makes a startling discovery while trying to find a way to beat the stock market mathematically.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Silence (2016) 83%

Martin Scorsese directs this adaptation of of a 1966 Shūsaku Endō novel about two Jesuit priests (Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver) who are sent to Japan amid anti-Christian sentiments to locate a missing member of their order.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Patriots Day (2016) 81%

Mark Wahlberg, J.K. Simmons, and John Goodman star in Peter Berg’s dramatization of the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing and the people who helped secure the scene and bring the suspects to justice.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Chimpanzee (2012) 76%

This Disneynature documentary centers on a young chimp named Oscar who finds support from an unexpected source when things take a dark turn for him.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Dark City (1998) 76%

Rufus Sewell, Keifer Sutherland, and Jennifer Connelly star in Alex Proyas’s sci-fi noir about an amnesiac man accused of murder who attempts to clear his name. This director’s cut of the film eliminates the opening narration and adds never-before-seen footage.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Miss Sloane (2016) 76%

Jessica Chastain stars in John Madden’s political drama about a powerful Washington lobbyist who takes on the gun industry on a proposal for reform.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Waking Sleeping Beauty (2009) 71%

This documentary takes a look at Walt Disney Pictures’ animated feature renaissance during the 1980s and 1990s, when the studio produced some of its biggest hits.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Why Him? (2016) 39%

Bryan Cranston and James Franco star in this comedy about an overprotective father who panics when he learns his daughter is set to be engaged to her boyfriend, a well-intentioned but often tactless and oblivious tech billionaire.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Assassin's Creed (2016) 18%

Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard star in this adaptation of the popular video game series about a man who uses experimental technology to relive the adventures of his ancestor, a member of a secret order of assassins.

Available now on: FandangoNOW

winter premieres edt

Clockwise from top left: The Mindy Project, Homeland, Throwing Shade, Reign, Jeff and Some Aliens, The Young Pope

The cold weather ushers in some familiar TV favorites like Homeland, Girls, and The Path that debut new seasons after the holidays, while fall titles like How to Get Away With Murder and The Walking Dead will return from a quick holiday break. Many new shows like The Mick, Planet Earth II, and The Young Pope will debut. Throw in a few TV movies (Beaches, Christmas special Doctor Who: The Return of Doctor Mysterio) and some events (Madonna: Rebel Heart Tour, Hairspray Live!), and we’ll call it “Winter TV.” Here’s the big list of upcoming premiere dates, starting in December through February. We’ll update this list as more dates are announced.

 


December | January | February | Preview: Spring


 December


Friday, Dec. 2
Fauda: Season 1 (2016) 100% Netflix
Lost in Oz: Season 1 (2017) Amazon (US premiere)
Pacific Heat: Season 1 (2016) 17% Netflix

NUP_173584_0308.JPG

Mariah’s World

Sunday, Dec. 4
Mariah's World: Season 1 (2016) 44% 9 p.m., E!
The Royals: Season 3 (2016) 10 p.m., E!

Monday, Dec. 5
() 8 p.m., FOX (special event)
Timber Creek Lodge: Season 1 (2016) 10 p.m., Bravo

Wednesday, Dec. 7
Shut Eye: Season 1 (2016) 37% Hulu
Hairspray Live! (2016) 76% 8 p.m., NBC

Thursday, Dec. 8
() % 10 p.m., A&E

Friday, Dec. 9
Captive: Season 1 () 75% Netflix
Club of Crows: Season 2 (2016) Netflix
Fuller House: Season 2 (2016) 50% Netflix
Mozart in the Jungle: Season 3 (2016) 100% Amazon
() 9 p.m., Showtime

Sunday, Dec. 11
The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses (2016) 100% 9 p.m., PBS

Wednesday, Dec. 14
Lee Daniel's Star: Season 1 () 35% 9 p.m., FOX
The Bureau: Season 1 (2009) 100% 11:50 p.m., Sundance (US premiere)

Friday, Dec. 16
Call Me Francis: Miniseries () Netflix
Crazyhead: Season 1 (2016) 100% Netflix
The Man in the High Castle: Season 2 (2016) 64% Amazon
No Second Chance: Miniseries (2015) Netflix
The OA: Season 1 (2016) 77% Netflix

Tuesday, Dec. 20
The Break: Season 1 (2016) Netflix
Call My Agent!: Season 1 (2015) 100% Netflix

trollhunters_103

Trollhunters

Friday, Dec. 23
Sense8: A Christmas Special () 88% Netflix
Travelers: Season 1 (2016) 100% Netflix (US premiere)
() % Netflix

Sunday, Dec. 25
Doctor Who: The Return of Doctor Mysterio (2016) 89% BBC America

Tuesday, Dec. 27
Ajin: Demi-Human: Season 2 (2016) Netflix
Chasing Cameron: Season 1 (2016) Netflix


 January


Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman in Sherlock season 4 airs on PBS (BBC)

Sherlock

Sunday, Jan. 1
Sherlock: Season 4 (2017) 54% PBS
The Mick: Season 1 (2017) 58% 8 p.m., FOX
Ransom: Season 1 (2017) 47% 8 p.m., CBS

Monday, Jan. 2
My Knight and Me: Season 1 () 4 p.m., Cartoon Network
The New Celebrity Apprentice: Season 15 (2017) 17% 8 p.m., NBC
Shadowhunters: Season 2 (2017) 86% 8 p.m., Freeform
Beyond: Season 1 (2017) 42% 9 p.m., Freeform

BONES: Cast L-R: John Boyd, TJ Thyne, Tamara Taylor, Michaela Conlin, Emily Deschanel and David Boreanaz. The 11th season of BONES premieres Thursday, Oct. 1 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2014 Fox Broadcasting Co. Cr: FOX

Bones

Tuesday, Jan. 3
Bones: Season 12 (2017) 93% 9 p.m., Fox
Killing Fields: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., Discovery

Wednesday, Jan. 4
It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia: Season 12 (2017) 90% 10 p.m., FXX
Too Close to Home: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., TLC
Man Seeking Woman: Season 3 (2017) 100%  10:30 p.m., FXX

Thursday, Jan. 5
Nashville: Season 5 (2017) 86% 9 p.m., CMT/TV Land
Ghosts in the Hood: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., WE tv
Portlandia: Season 7 (2017) 10 p.m., IFC

Friday, Jan. 6
Coin Heist (2017) Netflix
Degrassi: Next Class: Season 1 (2016) Netflix
One Day at a Time: Season 1 (2017) 97% Netflix
Tarzan and Jane: Season 1 (2017) Netflix
Grimm: Season 6 (2017) 83% 8 p.m., NBC
Emerald City: Season 1 (2017) 38% 9 p.m., NBC
Sleepy Hollow: Season 4 (2017) 9 p.m., FOX

Saturday, Jan. 7
Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds (2016) 100% 8 p.m., HBO

Tuesday, Jan.10
We're Lalaloopsy: Season 1 (2017) Netflix
Being Mary Jane: Season 4 (2017) 100% 9 p.m., BET
Taboo: Season 1 (2017) 76% 10 p.m., FX

schitts-creek-season-3

Schitt’s Creek

Wednesday, Jan. 11
Schitt's Creek: Season 3 (2017) 8 p.m., POP
Girlfriends' Guide to Divorce: Season 3 (2017) 10 p.m., Bravo
Workaholics: Season 7 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., Comedy Central
Jeff and Some Aliens: Season 1 () 100% 10:30 p.m., Comedy Central

Thursday, Jan. 12
() Crackle
Colony: Season 2 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., USA

Friday, Jan. 13
Clinical (2017) Netflix
() % Netflix
Just Add Magic: Season 2 (2016) Amazon
A Series of Unfortunate Events: Season 1 (2017) 94% Netflix
Sneaky Pete: Season 1 (2015) 97% Amazon

Jenna Coleman stars in "Victoria" (PBS)

Victoria

Sunday, Jan. 15
The Young Pope: Miniseries (2016) 80% 6 p.m., HBO (US premiere)
Homeland: Season 6 (2017) 78% 9 p.m., Showtime
Victoria on Masterpiece: Season 1 (2017) 80% 9 p.m., PBS

Tuesday, Jan. 17
Teachers: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., TV Land
Throwing Shade: Season 1 (2017) 10:30 p.m., TV Land

Wednesday, Jan. 18
SIX: Season 1 (2017) 62% 10 p.m., History

BASKETS -- "Easter in Bakersfield" Episode 104 (Airs Thursday, February 11, 10:00 pm/ep) Pictured: (left )Zach Galifianakis as Chip Baskets, (center) Louie Anderson as Christine Baskets. CR: Ben Cohen/FX

Baskets

Thursday, Jan. 19
Baskets: Season 2 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., FX

Friday, Jan. 20
Frontier: Season 1 (2016) 50% Netflix
Voltron: Legendary Defender: Season 2 (2017) 100% Netflix

Saturday, Jan. 21
Beaches (2017) 50% 8 p.m., Lifetime

Sunday, Jan. 22
Mercy Street: Season 2 (2017) 8 p.m., PBS
Hunted: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., CBS
Secrets of the Six Wives: Miniseries () 10 p.m., PBS

Monday, Jan. 23
Quantico: Season 2 (2016) 60% 10 p.m., ABC (returning)

Tuesday, Jan. 24
Terrace House: Aloha State: Season 1 () Netflix
Outsiders: Season 2 (2017) 10 p.m., WGN

path-edt

The Path

Wednesday, Jan. 25
The Path: Season 2 (2017) 75% Hulu
The Magicians: Season 2 (2017) 91% 9 p.m., SyFy
Suits: Season 6 (2016) 100% 10 p.m., USA (returning)

Thursday, Jan. 26
Grey's Anatomy: Season 13 (2016) 89% 8 p.m., ABC (returning)
Riverdale: Season 1 (2017) 88% 9 p.m., CW
Scandal: Season 6 (2017) 95% 9 p.m., ABC
How to Get Away With Murder: Season 3 (2017) 90% 10 p.m., ABC (returning)

Friday, Jan. 27
iBoy (2017) 69% Netflix
Z: The Beginning of Everything: Season 1 (2015) 69% Amazon

 Sunday, Jan. 29
Black Sails: Season 4 (2017) 80% 9 p.m., Starz

Monday, Jan. 30
Adventure Time: Islands: Miniseries () 100% 7:30 p.m., Cartoon Network

Tuesday, Jan. 31
The Fosters: Season 4 (2016) 8 p.m., Freeform (returning)
() % 9 p.m., Freeform

Back to Top

 


 February


Wednesday, Feb. 1
The 100: Season 4 (2017) 93% 9 p.m., CW
The Expanse: Season 2 (2017) 95% 10 p.m., SyFy

Thursday, Feb. 2
Powerless: Season 1 (2017) 61% 8:30 p.m., NBC
Superior Donuts: Season 1 (2017) 62% 8:30 p.m., CBS
Training Day: Season 1 (2017) 24% 10 p.m., CBS

Friday, Feb. 3
Santa Clarita Diet: Season 1 (2017) 78% Netflix

Sunday, Feb. 5
24: Legacy: Season 1 (2017) 60% 10 p.m., FOX

Monday, Feb. 6
APB: Season 1 (2017) 35% 9 p.m., FOX

NUP_171894_2213.JPG

Imposters

Tuesday, Feb. 7
Imposters: Season 1 (2017) 93% 10 p.m., Bravo
Detroiters: Season 1 (2017) 89% 10:30 p.m., Comedy Central

Wednesday, Feb. 8
Legion: Season 1 (2017) 90% 10 p.m., FX

Friday, Feb. 10
The Collection: Season 1 (2016) 42% Amazon
Reign: Season 4 (2017) 9 p.m., CW

Sunday, Feb. 12
The Missing: Season 2 (2016) 96% 8 p.m., Starz
The Walking Dead: Season 7 (2016) 66% 9 p.m., AMC (returning)
Girls: Season 6 (2017) 90% 10 p.m., HBO
Last Week Tonight With John Oliver: Season 4 (2017) 100% 11 p.m., HBO

Monday, Feb. 13
Humans: Season 2 (2016) 94% 10 p.m., AMC

Tuesday, Feb. 14
The Mindy Project: Season 5 (2016) 80% Hulu (returning)
Project MC2: Season 1 (2017), Netflix
You Me Her: Season 2 (2017), 8:30 p.m., DirecTV

Wednesday, Feb. 15
Doubt: Season 1 (2017) 55% 10 p.m., CBS

Thurssday, Feb. 16
SuperMansion: Season 2 (2017)  Crackle

peii_jungles_02Planet Earth II

Saturday, Feb. 18
Britney Ever After (2017) 8 p.m., Lifetime
Planet Earth II: Miniseries (2016) 100% 9 p.m., BBC America

Sunday, Feb. 19
The Good Fight: Season 1 (2017) 98% 8 p.m., CBS All Access
Big Little Lies: Season 1 (2017) 93% 9 p.m., HBO
Billions: Season 2 (2017) 89% 10 p.m., Showtime
Crashing: Season 1 (2017) 90% 10:30 p.m., HBO

Monday, Feb. 20
The Breaks: Season 1 (2017) 9 p.m., VH1
Bates Motel: Season 5 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., A&E

Tuesday, Feb. 21
The Detour: Season 2 (2017) 100% 10 p.m., TBS

Wednesday, Feb. 22
() % 9 p.m., TNT (returning)

Thursday, Feb. 23
The Blacklist: Redemption: Season 1 (2017) 10 p.m., NBC
Sun Records: Season 1 (2017) 60% 10 p.m., CMT

Friday, Feb. 24
Patriot: Season 1 (2015) 82% Amazon

Taken stars Jennifer Beals and Clive Standen (NBC)

Taken

Monday, Feb. 27
When We Rise: Season 1 (2017) 82% 9 p.m., ABC
Taken: Season 1 (2017) 32% 10 p.m. NBC

Back to Top


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