FX

The 50 Best TV Seasons of the 2010s, According to the Tomatometer

We’re celebrating the best TV of the decade with a look at the top-scoring seasons of 2010–2019, according to the Tomatometer. The second season of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s Fleabag takes the top spot, but don’t feel bad for season 1; it appears at No. 1 our list. Fellow Amazon Prime series Catastrophe, from creators Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney, tops the list for number of total seasons on the list with three of its four seasons Certified Fresh at 100% on the Tomatometer placing at Nos. 14, 15, and 25. Netflix title Master of None is the only show with two seasons in the top 10.

All of the seasons are Certified Fresh at 100%, by the way. We’re showing 50 here, but there are a total of 94 TV seasons from the decade that have 100% Certified Fresh scores. We ranked them according to the number of reviews each had at the season level. Fleabag season 2, for instance, has 95 season-level reviews with Insecure season 1 hot on its heels with 94 reviews. Meanwhile, season 2 of anthology series Fargo, which starred Patrick Wilson and Kirsten Dunst, has a total of 230 reviews total across the season and 10 episodes, but only 58 at the season level, and so the title appears lower on the list. But getting episode-level reviews is an accomplishment in itself; most shows don’t get enough reviews on each episode to get episodic scores.

Broad City and Jane the Virgin — girl power! — have the most seasons in the top 200 seasons of the decade with four each. Fan favorite Breaking Bad is represented twice, while Cobra Kai, which surprised audiences with its 100% Tomatometer score last year is at No. 11. The highest-ranked superhero series is Marvel’s Agents of Shield season 3. Meanwhile, some incredible TV seasons – many of Game of Thrones’, the current season of Watchmen – missed the list, because of just a few dissenting reviews.

Read on to find out which titles placed in the best TV of the decade.

Which is your favorite 100%  Certified Fresh season of TV? Let us know in the comments. 

Fleabag: Season 2 (2019)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Fleabag jumps back into the fray with a bracing second season that upholds its predecessor's frenzied wit and delicate heart, replete with Phoebe Waller-Bridge's indefatigable charisma.

Insecure: Season 1 (2016)
100%

#2
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Insecure uses star Issa Rae's breakout web series Awkward Black Girl as the basis for an insightful, raunchy, and hilarious journey through the life of a twentysomething black woman that cuts through stereotypes with sharp wit and an effusive spirit.

#3
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Exceptionally executed with charm, humor, and heart, Master of None is a refreshingly offbeat take on a familiar premise.

#4
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Family-driven drama and psychological themes propel The Americans' tautly drawn tension, dispensing thrills of a different ilk this season.

#5
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Master of None's second season picks up where its predecessor left off, delivering an ambitious batch of episodes that builds on the show's premise while adding surprising twists.

Fargo: Season 2 (2015)
100%

#6
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Season two of Fargo retains all the elements that made the series an award-winning hit, successfully delivering another stellar saga powered by fascinating characters, cheeky cynicism, and just a touch of the absurd.

#7
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: By voluntarily blowing up its premise, The Good Place sets up a second season that proves even funnier than its first.
Directed By: David Miner

#8
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Jane the Virgin's dubious premise has become part of its unlikely charm -- along with delightfully diverse writing and a knockout performance by Gina Rodriguez.

Counterpart: Season 1 (2017)
100%

#9
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Tense and gripping, Counterpart is an absorbing thrill-fest led by J.K. Simmons' multi-faceted dual lead performance.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Still evolving in its third season, Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. further hits its stride with a blend of thrills, humor, and heart.

Cobra Kai: Season 1 (2018)
100%

#11
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Cobra Kai continues the Karate Kid franchise with a blend of pleasantly corny nostalgia and teen angst, elevated by a cast of well-written characters.

Undone: Season 1 (2019)
98%

#12
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: A kaleidoscopic existential crisis, Undone bends the rules of space, time, and rotoscoping to weave a beautifully surreal tapestry that is at once fantastical and utterly relatable.

Homeland: Season 1 (2011)
100%

#13
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Homeland is an addictive, politically resonant spy thriller and compelling character study that benefits from superb performances.

Catastrophe: Season 3 (2017)
100%

#14
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Catastrophe deepens the drama in its latest season -- but remarkably loses none of its comedy along the way.

Catastrophe: Season 1 (2015)
100%

#15
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Catastrophe proves that there's still a place for simple romantic comedy on television, as long as the actors have chemistry and the jokes are laugh-out-loud funny.

Fleabag: Season 1 (2016)
100%

#16
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Clever and viciously funny, Fleabag is a touching, wildly inventive comedy about a complicated young woman navigating the aftermath of trauma.
Directed By: Harry Bradbeer

Barry: Season 2 (2019)
100%

#17
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Barry follows up a pitch-perfect debut with a second season that balances darkness with comedy while steering clear of antihero overindulgence.

#18
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: A pleasant change from typically gory zombie shows, The Returned is a must-see oddity that's both smart and sure to disturb.

Vida: Season 1 (2018)
100%

#19
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Vida explores familiar familial ground from a fresh perspective to create an earnest and heartfelt take on identity and what it means to belong.

Justified: Season 6 (2015)
100%

#20
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Justified returns to form for its endgame, rebounding with crisp storytelling and colorful characters who never take themselves too seriously.

#21
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Search Party is an engaging, weird, dark, funny mystery elevated by exceptional performances throughout.

Transparent: Season 3 (2016)
100%

#22
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Uniquely its own, and compelling and poignant as ever, Transparent continues to transcend the parameters of comedic and dramatic television with sustained excellence in its empathic portrayal of the Pfefferman family.

#23
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Breaking Bad's well-toned storytelling flares up this season with dramatic story changes and calculated direction.

#24
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Breaking Bad's fourth season continues to evolve and subvert expectations, and it's never been more riveting to watch.

Catastrophe: Season 2 (2015)
100%

#25
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Catastrophe delivers a strong second season that deepens the drama while remaining spit-take funny.

#26
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: The Killing is a slow burning mystery with an eerie, mutli-dimensional story propelled by thoughtful writing, believable characters, and realistic horror, even if its season finale was unsatisfying.

#27
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Pamela Adlon fully asserts her authorial voice over Better Things in a triumphant third season that examines the exhaustion of motherhood with exhilarating artistry.

#28
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: A wild philosophical ride to the very end, The Good Place brings it home with a forking good final season.

Big Mouth: Season 2 (2018)
100%

#29
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Poignantly repulsive, Big Mouth continues to confront the awkwardness of adolescence with foul-mouthed glee and an added layer of maturity.

#30
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: American Crime offers a unique anthology series filled with surprising revelations and compelling inter-connected narratives that opt for original, emotional human commentary instead of tired arguments over current events.

#31
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Dear White People's endearing excellence returns, but with an added layer of emotional maturity that enhances the show's powerful, relevant meditations on race relations in America.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Not letting up in season two, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt is still odd in the best of ways, wonderfully building on its unique comedy stylings and brilliantly funny cast.

Veep: Season 4 (2015)
100%

#33
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Veep shows no signs of slowing down in its fourth season, thanks to sharp, funny, rapid-fire dialogue between POTUS and her hilariously incompetent staff.

#34
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Babylon Berlin's humor and humanity pair nicely with its hypnotic visuals, resulting in a show that dazzles within its oversaturated genre.

#35
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Skillfully puncturing the idea of celebrity and our culture's bizarre obsession with it, BoJack Horseman's third season continues its streak as one of the funniest and most heartbreaking shows on television.

#36
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Igualmente hilarante y horripilante, Los Espookys is an espooky good time.

#37
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: One Day at a Time continues its ascent into classic sitcom territory without losing sight of its modern identity.

#38
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: The Bold Type presents an aspirational yet refreshingly realistic portrait of young women's careers, friendships and love lives in a big city.

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: With its excellent cast and resplendent period trappings, Downton Abbey continues to weave a bewitching, ingratiating spell.

#40
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: As timely and tender as ever, One Day at a Time's third season manages to up to comedy ante without losing the intimate family moments that help it hit so close to home.

#41
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Rick and Morty's fourth season is both an exciting progression and a delightful return to form that proves more than worth the two-year wait.

#42
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: You're the Worst continues to chart serious territory with intelligence, heart, and noxious wit in its third season, even as the anti-rom-com's damaged narcissist protagonists slowly start to get over themselves.

Dark: Season 2 (2019)
100%

#43
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Dark's sumptuous second season descends deeper into the show's meticulously-crafted mythos and cements the series as one of streaming's strongest and strangest science fiction stories.
Directed By: Baran bo Odar

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Return picks up right where its predecessor left off, retaining all the cult classic's crucial ingredients and adding a handful of fresh twists.

#45
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Planet Earth II offers a spectacular, moving, unprecedented account of the natural world.
Directed By: Mike Gunton

Big Mouth: Season 3 (2019)
97%

#46
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Like the characters at its center, Big Mouth's third season continues to grow, taking on complicated new issues with the same gross-but-utterly-empathetic eye that made it so lovable in the first place.

Broad City: Season 5 (2019)
100%

#47
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Glazer and Jacobson give the people exactly what they want in Broad City's final season - relatable content, questionable intimacy, and ingenious escapades through the glorious squalor of IRL NYC.

#48
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: America to Me confronts hard questions through candid moments in a Chicago high school, crafting an exploration of race and class relations in America that is as insightful as it is inspiring.
Starring:

Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Following a period of uncertainty and a shift to NBC, Brooklyn Nine-Nine reemerges with its cast and tone wholly intact.

Bunheads: Season 1 (2012)
100%

#50
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Smart, sharp, and effortlessly charming, Bunheads is a captivating blend of drama and comedy that succeeds on the strength of a terrific ensemble cast.


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This week on streaming video, we’ve got a few noteworthy television shows, a couple of worthy indies and at least one American classic. Then, there are also a bunch of Oscar-nominated films available for purchase. Read on for the full list:


New on Netflix

 

The Girl in the Book (2015) 93%

Emily VanCamp and Michael Nyqvist star in this drama about a book editor and aspiring author who must face her past when a man she once knew submits a book containing details of her life.

Available now on: Netflix


Dope (2015) 88%

Shameik Moore and Zoë Kravitz star in a Certified Fresh comedy about a bookworm who winds up in possession of  a bag full of drugs.

Available now on: Netflix


XXY (2007) 86%

This Certified Fresh coming-of-age drama focuses on a hermaphroditic teen’s struggle with sexuality growing up in Argentina and Uruguay.

Available now on: Netflix


Atonement (2007) 83%

James McAvoy, Keira Knightley, and Saoirse Ronan star in Joe Wright’s Certified Fresh period drama about a young girl who sabotages the relationship between her older sister and the man she loves.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Amazon Prime

 

The Americans: Season 3 (2015) 100%

Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys star in FX’s period drama about a pair of Soviet spies posing as a married American couple who must juggle family issues with their clandestine mission.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Justified: Season 6 (2015) 100%

Timothy Olyphant stars in another Certified Fresh FX drama, about a maverick lawman serving up justice in Kentucky. The final season is now available to stream.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


American Graffiti (1973) 96%

Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, and a young Harrison Ford headline George Lucas’s affectionate snapshot of 1960s Americana, which was nominated for Best Picture.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Meru (2015) 88%

This Certified Fresh documentary — shortlisted for the Best Documentary Feature Oscar this year — follows a team of mountain climbers who attempt to scale one of India’s most treacherous peaks and get more than they bargained for.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Newsroom: Season 3 (2005) 61%

Jeff Daniels and Emily Mortimer star in this HBO drama about a maverick news anchor and his dedicated staff at a fictional cable news network. The final season can now be streamed.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Available to Purchase

 

Room (2015) 93%

Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay star in this Certified Fresh Best Picture nominee about a young woman and her son who live in a shed as prisoners of the man who impregnated her.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu


Theeb (2014) 97%

This Certified Fresh nominee for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar centers on a young Bedouin who guides a British soldier across inhospitable terrain to find a water hole in the desert.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes


Creed (2015) 95%

Sylvester Stallone reprised his iconic role as Rocky Balboa (and earned a Best Supporting Actor nod) for this Certified Fresh spinoff, about the estranged son of Apollo Creed (Michael B. Jodan), who aspires to a boxing career of his own.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu


Trumbo (2015) 75%

Bryan Cranston also earned a Best Actor nomination of his own for his portrayal of Dalton Trumbo in this drama about the prolific Hollywood writer who, along with several others, was jailed for his political beliefs and fought against the notion of the “blacklist.”

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu


The Danish Girl (2015) 67%

And lastly, Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander both also earned acting nominations for this period drama about a celebrated painter who underwent pioneering gender confirmation surgery.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu

This week on home video, we’ve got a a sci-fi spectacle from Disney, a big disaster film starring Dwayne Johnson, and the complete set of one of the most talked about dramas of the last decade. Then we’ve got an acclaimed indie coming-of-age comedy, a couple more complete series sets, and a couple of choices from the Criterion Collection. Read on for the full list:


Tomorrowland (2015) 50%

Britt Robertson stars as Casey, a smart, idealistic teenager who experiences a vision of a magical, futuristic realm and teams up with Frank (George Clooney), a fallen scientific wunderkind, who can help to transport her to the place of her dreams. Extras include a making-of doc hosted by director Brad Bird, videos on the cast and score, an animated short, production diaries, deleted scenes, and more.

Get it Here


San Andreas (2015) 49%

Dwayne Johnson plays Ray Gaines, a soon-to-be-divorced LAFD helicopter pilot who finds himself racing up the California coast to save his wife (Carla Gugino) and daughter (Alexandra Daddario) when the titular fault line erupts in a massively destructive earthquake. Bonus features include a profile of the real San Andreas Fault, deleted scenes, a gag reel, a stunt reel, and more.

Get it Here


Dope (2015) 88%

Relative newcomer Shameik Moore impressed a lot of folks with his star turn in this Certified Fresh indie comedy about a smart, 1990s hip-hop-obsessed inner-city high schooler who winds up in possession of  a bag full of drugs and hatches a scheme with his two best friends to get rid of it. Just two extras to be found here: a profile of the film’s themes and characters, and a look at the iconic music that makes up much of the soundtrack.

Get it Here


Mad Men: Season 7 (2015) 90%

The final chapter in the story of “Don Draper” and his exciting life has finally aired, and those of you looking to own the whole shebang are now free to buy it in one large package (which comes with a pair of tumblers and a ton of special features). The rest of you who have been collecting individual seasons over the years can still pick up part 2 of the final season, which is being sold separately.

Get it Here


Justified: Season 6 (2015) 100%

If Mad Men wasn’t your thing, and you’d prefer to have a commemorative flask instead of a couple of tumblers, then you can always pick up the complete set of this Certified Fresh FX drama about a maverick lawman (Timothy Olyphant) serving up justice in Kentucky. In addition to the flask, you’ll get all six seasons of the show, all the previous bonuses, an extra disc full of brand new special features, and a book.

Get it Here


Bates Motel: Season 3 (2015) 95%

The third season of A&E’s dramatic prequel to Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho catches up with Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) as he enters high school. Mother Norma (Vera Farmiga) chooses to homeschool him, and things get a little creepy to say the least. Bonus features include deleted scenes and a look a the relationship between mother and son.

Get it Here


The Following: Season 3 () 63%

The Following was unfortunately cancelled this year, but if you want to own all three seasons of the serial killer/detective show starring Kevin Bacon and James Purefoy, it’s available in a box set. The third season is also available individually.

Get it Here


The Gallows (2015) 14%

In this found-footage thriller, a group of high school students decide to revive a play that killed its lead actor onstage twenty years earlier, and spookiness ensues. The film wasn’t received well, but if you’d like to own it, special features include a full, feature-lengh “original version,” behind-the-scenes featurettes, deleted scenes, and more.

Get it Here


The Brood (1979) 84%

The first of two Criterion Collection releases this week, this supernatural thriller from David Cronenberg tells the parallel stories of a disturbed woman undergoing radical psychotherapy and her daughter, who is tormented by childlike demons. The new package includes a doc on the making of the film, cast interviews, and more.

Get it Here


A Special Day (1977) 100%

The second offering from Criterion stars Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni in a drama about a housewife and a radio journalist who bond with each other on the day that Italy welcomed Adolf Hitler to Rome in 1938. Bonuses include a short film from 2014 starring Loren, an interview with Loren and director Ettore Scola, and more.

Get it Here

Summer is upon us and you know what that means — the beach, baseball games, barbecues, and hours upon hours of binge-watching television in a dark, air-conditioned room. Here are our picks for which TV shows you should be bingeing on for the month of June.


True Detective

What it is: HBO’s serialized crime drama anthology was designed to feature a new story each season. Told partially in flashback across two decades, its acclaimed first season starred Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson as a pair of former Louisiana homicide detectives who are brought in for questioning when a disturbing murder conjures familiar cult imagery from a similar case they worked together in 1995.

Why you should watch it: The first season was nominated for a number of awards, taking home four Emmys, and McConaughey and Harrelson earned a fair bit of acclaim for their powerful, nuanced performances. The show is a slow burn, full of creeping tension and philosophical meditations on life and death, but it also packs a mean visceral punch, making it one of the most complex and rewarding dramas in recent memory. Since the second season premieres on Jun. 21, now is a great time to catch up on the series and get a feel for its tone before it delivers its second gut punch.

Where to watch: If you don’t have an HBO Go subscription, you can purchase individual episodes online from iTunes, Vudu, or Amazon Prime. Otherwise, you can pick up the DVD or Blu-ray in a season set, which is available now.

Commitment: Eight hours.


Orange Is the New Black

What it is: Inspired by the real-life story of Piper Kerman, Orange Is the New Black follows a thirty-something New Yorker as she adjusts to her 15-month sentence in a prison after a long-ago lesbian affair with an international drug smuggler catches up with her. We also get to know the diverse prison population and their past actions that landed them there.

Why you should watch it: With season three premiering Jun. 12 on Netflix, now is the perfect time to get caught up on one of TV’s most critically acclaimed, buzzed about shows. With its frank honesty and game-changing look at crime, race, gender, and female sexuality, Orange Is the New Black shows character types rarely shown on television.

Where to watch: The first two seasons are streaming on Netflix, and are available on DVD and Blu-ray.

Commitment: 26 hours.


Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

What it is: Following the events of The Avengers, S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg) assembles a handpicked team of the agency’s “best and brightest” to investigate unusual phenomena in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Why you should watch it: Gregg’s Phil Coulson is one of the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s secret weapons. He keeps that universe grounded, and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. gives him some great foils. Although the major superheroes are missing, Coulson’s fellow agents May, Fitz, and Simmons are solid characters in their own right.

Where to watch: On Jun. 11, season two comes to Netflix, where season one is currently streaming. You can also catch up on both seasons on Amazon Instant Video, Google Play, iTunes, and Vudu, and Xbox Video.

Commitment: 33 hours.


The Strain

What it is: A vampiric “virus” is discovered after a plane lands in New York with all but four passengers dead of mysterious causes. The remaining survivors gradually acquire a rapacious appetite for — can you guess? — blood. The virus spreads throughout New York in The Strain‘s freshman season, exposing cryptic roots and narratives that lead back to Nazi Germany.

Why you should watch it: This one is darker than The Vampire Diaries and less tongue-in-cheek than True Blood. The devolution of the plane survivors into vampires and the spread of the disease unraveling make season one a top-notch horror-fest. The gore is plentiful and mesmerizing, with deliciously disgusting villains.

Where to watch: Season two premieres Jul. 12 at 10 p.m. on FX. Season one, though, can be found on Amazon Instant Video, iTunes, and Vudu.

Commitment: 10 hours.


The Wire

What it is: Broadly speaking, The Wire follows a ragtag task force assembled by the Baltimore Police Department to investigate a local drug kingpin suspected of multiple homicides. As the case expands, it illuminates the systemic malaise and corruption plaguing the city’s various public institutions.

Why you should watch it: There are plenty of police procedurals in the world, and there are plenty of movies about inner-city life, but nothing before or since has captured the rhythms of a city — from the street corners to the interrogation rooms, from the docks to the halls of power — like The Wire does for Baltimore.

Where to watch: Every episode is available on Amazon Instant Video, HBO Go, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, and Xbox Video.

Commitment: 60 hours.


Justified

What it is: Inspired by the Elmore Leonard story, “Fire in the Hole”, Timothy Olyphant is quick-on-the-draw Deputy US Marshal Raylan Givens, whose itchy trigger finger has gotten him reassigned to Lexington, KY, near his hometown of Harlan. He is quickly drawn back to the problems and rivalries that he’d hoped he’d left behind.

Why you should watch it: The final season was released on DVD on Jun. 2, so you you can now binge the entire series without interruption. Rylan’s rivalry with Boyd Crowder (Walton Goggins) is a lynchpin of the series, and watching these two play off one another is not to be missed. The recurring roles also feature a stable of some of the finest character actors in Hollywood.

Where to watch: All seasons are streaming on Amazon Instant Video, Google Play, iTunes, PlayStation, Vudu, and Xbox Video. Seasons one through six are also available on DVD and Blu-ray.

Commitment: 78 hours.


The Spoils of Babylon

What it is: An epic spoof of melodramatic miniseries that follows the tumultuous relationship between Cynthia Morehouse (Kristen Wiig) and her adoptive brother Devon (Tobey Maguire).

Why you should watch it: A preposterous potboiler full of hammy acting, zero-budget special effects, tasteless clothing, and surreal casting choices (Jessica Alba as a marine biologist! Carey Mulligan as the voice of Devon’s mannequin wife! Haley Joel Osment as Cynthia’s spoiled son!), The Spoils of Babylon is so stupid that it’s kind of genius. It’s worth watching for Will Ferrell’s performance as Eric Jonrosh, the boozy, pompous author of the (fake) source novel.

Where to watch: The complete masterwork can be viewed on Amazon Instant Video, Google Play, iTunes, Netflix,Vudu, and Xbox Video.

Commitment: Two glorious hours.


Seinfeld

What it is: Based on the stand-up comedy of comedian Jerry Seinfeld, the show follows four 30-something New Yorkers going about their lives who happen to find themselves in bizarre, yet true-to-life situations on a daily basis.

Why you should watch it: The original show about nothing, after nearly a decade dominating the sitcom game, the Seinfeld‘s quirky characters and their shenanigans have worked their way deep into the cultural lexicon. No soup for you!

Where to watch: All nine seasons are coming to Hulu on Jun. 24 and the complete series is available on DVD.

Commitment: 66 hours.


Extant

What it is: Halle Berry stars in a Steven Spielberg sci-fi mystery series that explores a female astronaut’s challenging efforts to fit back into society after spending a year in space. To make matters worse and weirder, she finds that she has returned with an embryo growing rapidly inside her, even though there has been no cause for the conception.

 

Why you should watch it: It’s worth a watch because it has Spielberg and Berry’s names on it alone. But it maintains intrigue as a conspiracy thriller tangled around an odd, sci-fi sort of immaculate conception. Futuristic technology is still fun to see, as is a potential generation of robot kids for parents who desire familial add-ons. More mystery will arrive in season two with the addition of Jeffrey Dean Morgan to the cast.

 

Where to watch: The show returns with new episodes Jul. 1 on CBS, and you can watch season one on Amazon Instant Video now.

Commitment: 10 hours.


Parks and Recreation

What it is: SNL alum Amy Poehler plays Leslie Knope, the sweet, slightly neurotic workaholic Deputy Director of the Parks and Recreation department in the fictional town of Pawnee, IN. Ambitious and perpetually optimistic, Leslie is sometimes prone to work-related tunnel vision, but her eccentric and affectionate staff — including her staunchly anti-bureaucracy boss Ron Swanson (Nick Offerman) — help to nudge her back in the right direction when she needs it.

Why you should watch it: Parks and Rec officially ended its run earlier this year, and the complete series just found its way onto DVD this week, so it’s the perfect time to find out what made the series such a fan favorite. Created by the folks who brought you The Office, the show is a breezy workplace comedy with a sweet center and a fantastic cast of supporting characters — many of whom were relative unknowns when the series began and have gone on to become stars in their own right (Offerman, Chris Pratt, Aziz Ansari, Aubrey Plaza).

Where to watch: If you choose not to go the DVD route, you can still catch the show on Amazon Prime, Hulu Plus, iTunes, Netflix, and Vudu.

Commitment: At 125 episodes over seven seasons, it’s about 46 hours.


Which of these shows would you recommend to a friend? Let us know in the comments section below!

FX’s Justified, starring Timothy Olyphant, Walton Goggins, Nick Searcy, and Joelle Carter, had its final showdown Tuesday night. Was it a satisfying ending to the series’ six-season run? The critics weigh in on “The Promise” and whether or not it delivered. [Warning: spoilers ahead!]


Did Justified do right by the characters?

Holly Anderson, Grantland: As victory laps go, Art drolly extolling the relative exercise benefits of target shooting is way, way up there, but for more serious reasons later on in the hour, it’s a very good thing to have Art back in Raylan’s corner.

Alan Sepinwall, HitFix: The finale gets to have its cake and eat it, too, by avoiding a Raylan/Boyd gunfight and instead giving us one between our hero and his mustachioed imitator — and, in a continuation of Raylan’s slight maturity, making it a duel that Boon wants far more than our hero.

James Queally, Los Angeles Times: This episode belonged to Raylan, Boyd and Ava.


How well did it honor Elmore Leonard?

Seth Amitin, IGN Movies: Like a good book, we put down the remote and felt satisfied. Elmore Leonard would be proud.

Kevin Yeoman, ScreenRant: Justified ends its six-season run in a manner befitting the spirit of the series, its protagonist Raylan Givens, and, certainly, author Elmore Leonard. That is to say: on its own terms and with its own unique voice.


Did the series come full circle?

James Poniewozik, TIME Magazine: “The Promise” uses its callbacks to give us the happiest ending this show can: suggesting that, with work, old patterns can be broken.

Kristi Turnquist, The Oregonian: Their story has circled around to end exactly as it should. And contrary to the song — and our expectations — all of the major characters in Justified did get out of Harlan County alive.

Joanne Ostrow, Denver Post: The seasons felt like chapters, the entire endeavor was literate TV. No surprise, then, that the tale came full circle in the finale.

Allen St. John, Forbes: Justified, a series that has been nothing if not confounding, ends in a way that’s, well, confounding.


Where were the shocking deaths?

Alisdair Wilkins, AV Club: That’s the kind of storytelling decision a series finale should have, one that is simultaneously unexpected and inevitable.

Hal Boedeker, Orlando Sentinel: Fans may have expected a fiery fadeout, but Justified delivered something else that was so satisfying. The distinctive series left on its own colorful, personal terms.

Kyle Fowle, Entertainment Weekly: The finale manages to subvert everything we know about how noir-tinged, contemporary Westerns should end (with a violent shootout, right?) while also never straying into easy sentimentality or a tidy finish.


What about the end of the episode?

Matt Zoller Seitz, New York Magazine/Vulture: The end might be the best cut to black since the end of The Sopranos, though of course the artistic intent could not be more different. We saw what happened, we know what it meant, now it’s all over.

Jack McKinney, Paste Magazine: I said earlier that the mark of a truly great series finale is for the audience to look back and wonder how they ever thought that it could end differently. Was there ever really any other acceptable ending than one last Raylan/Boyd conversation?


What was the lasting impression of the series?

Tim Goodman, Hollywood Reporter: It’s important to remember that series finales are so fraught with peril that judging them is always a difficult task — but this one was a resounding success.

Maureen Ryan, Huffington Post: Justified was always about transcending something, which makes it appropriate that the show’s ending transcended my expectations.

Courtney Vaudreuil, TV Equals: It’s a sad day for Justified fans, but I’d like to say thank you to the writers for giving us a final episode that was true to the characters, entertaining, funny, sad, and sentimental.


Season six of Justified is Certified Fresh at 100 percent. What did you think of the series finale? Let us know in the comments below.

This week at the movies, we’ve got fairy tale creatures (Strange Magic, with voice performances from Alan Cumming and Evan Rachel Wood), an eccentric adventurer (Mortdecai, starring Johnny Depp and Gwyneth Paltrow), and a troubled teacher-student relationship (The Boy Next Door, starring Jennifer Lopez and Ryan Guzman). What do the critics have to say?


Strange Magic

18%

On paper, an animated musical inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream sounds reasonably promising. Unfortunately, critics say Strange Magic could use a whole lot more pixie dust — along with visual inspiration and interesting characters. It’s the story of Marianne (voiced by Evan Rachel Wood), a fairy princess who’s been jilted by her Prince Charming. The cad then discovers a love potion, which sets off a series of battles and daring rescues. The pundits say Strange Magic is oddly charmless, and its few clever ideas are smothered by a plot that’s both patchwork and overly busy.



Mortdecai

12%

What’s the deal with Johnny Depp? With the exception of the animated Rango, the man who was once the biggest star in Hollywood hasn’t had a critically approved starring vehicle since Public Enemies in 2009. The critics say Mortdecai is a stunning misfire, a tonally-jarring would-be caper comedy that reduces its talented cast to broad, goofy caricatures. Depp is Charlie Mortdecai, a mustachioed, anachronistic rogue who’s tasked with recovering a stolen Goya painting; hilarity, in the form of pratfalls and double-entendres, ensues. The pundits say Mortdecai is visually sharp but comically dull; it’s an attempt at satire that seems unsure of what exactly it’s lampooning. (Check out this week’s 24 Frames for a gallery of Johnny Depp’s wildest looks through the years.)



The Boy Next Door

12%

The divide between trashy fun and plain ol’ trash is often razor thin. Critics say The Boy Next Door falls on the wrong side of the line, promising campy thrills that it can’t ultimately deliver. Jennifer Lopez stars as a high school English teacher who’s taking a break from her husband when she has a tryst with a teenager. Naturally, he becomes obsessed and possessive, threatening our heroine’s security and peace of mind. The pundits say The Boy Next Door simmers but never reaches full boil, so its silly dialogue and ludicrous plotting are never quite as entertaining as they could be. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we count down Lopez’s best-reviewed movies, as well as director Rob Cohen’s Five Favorite Films.)

What’s Hot On TV:


Critics say Justified (100 percent) returns to form for its endgame, rebounding with crisp storytelling and colorful characters who never take themselves too seriously.

The critics say the high quality execution and cool characters are top-notch, but the nonsensical time-travel scenarios make 12 Monkeys (54 percent) less watchable than its original source material.

The pundits say the stale cop humor of Backstrom (33 percent) is a cop-out, availed little by the talented cast’s attempt to make the best of its sloppy schtick.

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • Red Army, a documentary about the legendary Soviet hockey team, is at 100 percent.
  • The Duke Of Burgundy, a drama about an erotic relationship between two entomologists in a lavish country estate, is at 97 percent.
  • Mommy, a drama about a single mother dealing with her difficult teenage son, is Certified Fresh at 91 percent.
  • Salvation Army, a coming-of-age drama about a gay Moroccan teenager dealing with complex family and societal dynamics, is at 83 percent.
  • Killers, a thriller about a serial killer and a vigilante who each record videos of their bloody deeds, is at 83 percent.
  • Black Sea, starring Jude Law and Scoot McNairy in a thriller about a submarine crew searching the deep for rumored treasure, is Certified Fresh at 78 percent.
  • Son of a Gun, starring Ewan McGregor and Brenton Thwaites in a drama about a small-time crook who falls under the influence of a seasoned criminal, is at 59 percent.
  • The Humbling, starring Al Pacino and Greta Gerwig in a drama about an emotionally fragile actor who is rejuvinated by a much younger woman, is at 56 percent.
  • Cake, starring Jennifer Aniston and Anna Kendrick in a drama about a woman suffering from chronic physical and emotional pain, is at 38 percent.
  • Song One, starring Anne Hathaway and Mary Steenburgen in a drama about aspiring New York City folkies, is at 37 percent.
  • Manny, a documentary about the champion prizefighter and politician Manny Pacquiao, is at 25 percent.
  • We’ll Never Have Paris, starring Melanie Lynskey and Simon Helberg in a romantic comedy about a passive guy who chases the ex he dumped when she relocates to the City of Lights, is at 20 percent.
  • Americons, a drama about the rise and fall of a shady real estate investment firm, is at 17 percent.

From the creators of "Smallville" comes a new series that most likely won’t ever see the light of day, mainly because its price-tag was a little too steep, but also because of all the confusion regarding the amalgamation of UPN and The WB. But a trailer for "Aquaman: Mercy Reef" made it onto the internet, so click right here to have a look.

Garth from Dark Horizons explains it a lot better than I do: "Developed by "Smallville" creators Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, the pilot had the likes of Justin Hartley in the title role along with well known actors like Ving Rhames and Lou Diamond Phillips in supporting parts. The show, which was originally developed at The WB before it merged with UPN, was expected to be a shoe-in for newly created The CW network – that was until last week.

When The CW announced its new Fall shows line-up on Thursday, no sign of the show (alternately titled "Mercy Reef" or simply "The Reef") existed – only one ‘family on the run’ drama entitled "Runaway" made it into the final line-up. A surprise but not unexpected, a high concept genre series like "Aquaman" is expensive to produce which is not a welcome idea for a smaller network."

Anyone disappointed by the Aquaman pre-cancellation?

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