The Walking Dead season 11

(Photo by AMC)

Every Episode of The Walking Dead Ranked by Tomatometer

Updated 10/11/21.

The Walking Dead fans have hung with AMC’s zombie series for over 10 seasons now — 161 episodes — and helped the show break several ratings records, including the most-watched cable episode in history when its season 5 premiere aired.

Apparently, the saga of Rick (Andrew Lincoln), Carl (Chandler Riggs), Michonne (Danai Gurira), Daryl (Norman Reedus), Carol (Melissa McBride), Maggie (Lauren Cohan), Glenn (Steven Yeun), Morgan (Lennie James), and the rest of the gang has legs — and feet and arms and decapitated heads — to spare.

We looked at how each of its episodes so far have fared on the Tomatometer and found the most Rotten episodes occurred in season 6, with five of the 16 episodes in that season being deemed Rotten by a consensus of critics (although the season fared well overall — it is Certified Fresh at 76%).

The fifth season is the Freshest of the bunch, with eight TWD seasons overall Certified Fresh, and with the highest overall score at 90%.

Seasons 5 and 3 scored the most episodes in the top 10, claiming four slots each standing at 100%. Season 7’s premiere, “The Day Will Come When You Won’t Be,” had the most reviews of any individual episode with 54 — unsurprising, given that it was the episode in which viewers found out which characters Negan (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) had brained.

Where did “For Blood,” episode 8 of season 11 land? Read on to find out!

What was your favorite episode of The Walking Dead? Tell us in the comments.

Critics Consensus: "Start to Finish" fails to live up to The Walking Dead's potential with a midseason finale that is both dull and frustrating.
Synopsis: After a few moments of peace, trouble finds its way to Alexandria again with a threat that may be too... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Diverged" focuses on fan-favorites Carol and Daryl, but this wheel-spinning installment adds very few fresh layers to these already well-established characters.
Synopsis: At the lowest point in their friendship, Daryl and Carol come to a fork in the road and head their... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The King, The Widow, and Rick" spreads itself between too many storylines, and thereby doesn't accomplish much in the process.
Synopsis: With things looking up for Rick and the group, an argument breaks out at the Hilltop; the consequences of the... [More]

Critics Consensus: Despite Jeffrey Dean Morgan's deliciously evil turn as Negan, the meandering "Last Day on Earth" -- and its manipulative cliffhanger ending -- make for a disappointing season finale.
Synopsis: To save one of their own, Rick's group must venture outside the walls; their experience changes their lives forever.... [More]

Critics Consensus:
Synopsis: As the Governor's impending attack looms, Rick and the others consider whether the prison is worth defending; Andrea struggles to... [More]

#156
Critics Consensus: "Now" provides deeper portrayals of some of the Alexandria crew -- but at the expense of furthering the stories of the Walking Dead characters we actually care about.
Synopsis: The sheltered citizens inside the walls of Alexandria must face a grim reality that might be too much for them... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Cherokee Rose" is an episode that seems as stuck as the characters in the story, but has a few touching moments.
Synopsis: Shane makes a deadly sacrifice that inspires unusual behavior and self-distancing; the rest of the group struggles to find the... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Dead Weight" continues season four's midseason narrative drift, idling through a subplot that will leave some fans eager to move on to the next chapter.
Synopsis: At the camp outside the prison, the addition of new members threatens the peace; something new unfolds as the Governor... [More]

Critics Consensus: With "Heads Up," The Walking Dead offers the resolution to a major cliffhanger, but with frustrating results.
Synopsis: Alexandria is finally able to begin pulling itself back together; peace is embraced between the two groups.... [More]

Critics Consensus: While the simmering grudge between Maggie and Negan continues to provide tension, "Hunted" finds the The Walking Dead stumbling with choppy pacing and cheap storytelling shortcuts.
Synopsis: Maggie's mission team gets separated and hunted by the Reapers; Carol, Rosita, Magna and Kelly attempt to catch horses for... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Damned" stumbles after the season opener, with the unexpected return of a forgotten character, and a whole lot of action -- but not a whole lot of thrills.
Synopsis: The plan involving Alexandrians, Kingdommers and Hilltoppers unfolds; as Rick continues to fight, he encounters a familiar face.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Though a necessary breather from the prior episode's climactic tragedy, "Them" is a slower-than-expected demonstration of unsubtle verbosity.
Synopsis: The group feels beaten after living life on the road, but must continue to trudge along in spite of the... [More]

Critics Consensus: Despite featuring significant deaths and action sequences, "Monsters" struggles to make meaningful progress in the season's overall story.
Synopsis: Conflict with the Saviors leads to unintended consequences for the Hilltop, the Kingdom, and Alexandria; morality proves tricky in wartime.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Twice as Far" has a few powerful moments, but overall lacks enough focus or depth to make up for jumbled storylines, a pointless death, and a frustrating finish.
Synopsis: Two separate groups leave Alexandria for supplies, and while both worry over the future of the community, they will face... [More]

Critics Consensus: Focusing on different characters and presenting a new walker threat, "Dead Or Alive Or" is an entertaining episode -- though one that struggles to build suspense.
Synopsis: Daryl finds himself in bad company as his group heads to the Hilltop; Maggie makes difficult decisions at the Hilltop;... [More]

Critics Consensus: An okay capper to a strong half-season, "Coda" alternates between electrifying tension and a meandering plot.
Synopsis: New enemies disregard rules and morals; although Rick wants to find a peaceful agreement, the enemies seem to prefer a... [More]

Critics Consensus:
Synopsis: Rick and the Governor convene for a tense negotiation of a peace treaty between their respective groups, hoping to prevent... [More]

Critics Consensus: Although its focus on a secondary character often leaves "Swear" feeling like a diversion, the discovery - and impending danger - of a new community is a refreshing development.
Synopsis: Someone stumbles upon a brand new society unlike anything seen before.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Though the pace is slower than desired, "Service" systematically sets a foundation for a frightening future while furthering the story of life under Negan's rule.
Synopsis: The remaining members of the group try to keep it together in Alexandria; they receive a sobering visit.... [More]

Critics Consensus: The promise of bigger moments to come helps to liven up the deliberate pace of "Judge, Jury, Executioner," while strong work from the cast elevates its talky script.
Synopsis: Rick sides with Shane causing Dale to worry that the group is losing its humanity; Carl's actions have unintended consequences.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "East" meanders quite a bit, but it also makes room for some thrills and leaves viewers with a huge cliffhanger leading into the season finale.
Synopsis: When someone goes missing in Alexandria, the community goes on alert, and search parties venture out.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Splinter" doesn't move this season's story forward in any meaningful way, but Paola Lázaro's performance and some hallucinatory flourishes keep this character-focused installment from being wholly redundant.
Synopsis: Eugene, Ezekiel, Yumiko, and Princess are captured and separated by the mysterious troopers that surrounded them at the rail yard;... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Find Me" feels like a meandering look back when it should be forging ahead, but Norman Reedus' stoic appeal and striking cinematography keep this installment compelling.
Synopsis: Daryl and Carol find an old cabin that takes Daryl back to his years away from the group after Rick... [More]

Critics Consensus: Few surprises and far too many dumb decisions -- is this really "How It's Gotta Be?"
Synopsis: Every story and battle from the first half of the season comes crashing together in this action-packed, emotional mid-season finale.... [More]

Critics Consensus: While a Beth-centric episode feels unnecessary, "Slabtown" is an example of how the occasional departure from the main story can have its own tension and sense of place.
Synopsis: Another group of survivors is introduced, and although things appear safe and nice, there is a bit of a dark... [More]

Critics Consensus:
Synopsis: The Governor chases a fleeing dissenter; while the Governor is gone, a traitor tries to sabotage his plans.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Daryl is an involving tour guide through The Walking Dead's final batch of antagonists, although "Rendition" won't convince the skeptics that The Reapers are much different than the murderous militias who have plagued the series before.
Synopsis: Daryl and Dog get captured by the Reapers; they are taken to the Meridian and reconnect with a familiar figure... [More]

Critics Consensus: Though it relies on familiar themes, "Nebraska" successfully addresses the fallout of the previous episode and forges ahead slowly but confidently.
Synopsis: Rick and the others try to restore order after a terrible discovery; Hershel takes up an old habit and disappears.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Bloodletting" introduces several new characters that fans of the comic books will happily recognize, but doesn't feature much of the gore that the title would indicate.
Synopsis: Rick discovers a possible safe haven; Shane must go on a dangerous mission to get needed medical supplies.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Like much of season four, "Live Bait" favors character development over action, although its deliberate pace may test the patience of some viewers.
Synopsis: Following his defeat at Woodbury, the Governor wanders aimlessly until he encounters a family in need.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Something They Need" overcomes an uneven arc with humor, an upbeat pace, and a classic Walking Dead cliffhanger.
Synopsis: A group of Alexandrians embarks on a journey; one member of the group must make a heartbreaking decision.... [More]

Critics Consensus: The flashback-laden "The Day Will Come When You Won't Be" is slow to deliver the payoff from last season's finale -- but ultimately delivers with sadistic acts of gut-wrenching violence that will push Walking Dead fans to their limit.
Synopsis: As the members of the group remain helpless, Negan takes action that will forever haunt those who survive.... [More]

Critics Consensus: With "Inmates," The Walking Dead continues to jump between separate bands of survivors, maintaining solid tension in the process.
Synopsis: Beth remains hopeful, and she and Daryl search for other survivors of the Governor's attack; the now-divided group faces obstacles... [More]

Critics Consensus: Though some character motivations remain boggling, a dangerous morality shift between hero and villain -- along with a gratifyingly gruesome death -- make "Still Gotta Mean Something" an enthralling lead-up to the final two episodes of this The Walking Dead season.
Synopsis: A Heaps prisoner makes a discovery; Carol searches for someone in the nearby forest; Rick and Morgan find themselves in... [More]

Critics Consensus: By focusing on Daryl Dixon, "Chupacabra" takes a step forward in the story, but still feels like it's the set-up for something larger.
Synopsis: Rick and the other survivors continue searching for Sophia; Hershel disagrees with the group's plan and tells them they are... [More]

Critics Consensus: Talking is not The Walking Dead's strong suit, and "Home" has a lot of it, but the episode is redeemed by an action-packed ending.
Synopsis: The group debates the next step; Rick searches for a lost friend; Daryl and Merle question their choices; the Governor... [More]

Critics Consensus: A serviceable-but-lackluster return from hiatus, "The Suicide King" leaves the zombie-starved viewer wanting more.
Synopsis: Rick tries to save one of his group; Woodbury is in disarray; new guests at the prison raise concerns.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Alone" is a bit weaker than the last couple installments, but it maintains a balance between character development and suspense.
Synopsis: Daryl and Beth find shelter while another group has a realization about their own protection; Sasha, Bob and Maggie clash... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Other Side" delves into the sorrowful aftermath of losing key characters with a slow-building narrative that gathers speed -- and gains power -- along the way.
Synopsis: The Saviors visit the Hilltop unexpectedly, surprising everyone, with plans of taking more than supplies.... [More]

Critics Consensus: The Walking Dead delivers another character-driven episode in "The Cell," which successfully delves deeper into the world of Negan and his cronies, even if its attempts to humanize a villain achieve somewhat mixed results.
Synopsis: A new group of survivors seem to have it all in their impressive community; however, there is a price.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Time for After" improves on TWD's previous episode by focusing on Eugene's emotional struggle.
Synopsis: Negan has to enlist the help of his lieutenants in solving a huge issue facing the Sanctuary; Rick and the... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Do Not Send Us Astray" focuses on a fan favorite and features some exciting battle action -- although with a bit of a mid-episode lull.
Synopsis: Trouble arises when unexpected visitors arrive at the Hilltop and the community is thrust into action; heartbreaking discoveries are made.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Though lacking significant plot progression, "Go Getters" presents a satisfying female perspective, strong character choices, and a rare glimmer of hope.
Synopsis: Saddled with grief and surrounded by enemies, members of the group try to find safety at the Hilltop before it's... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Guts" finds The Walking Dead settling into a gory groove and delivering thrilling action, even when some of its character development feels cliched.
Synopsis: Rick unknowingly causes a group of survivors to be trapped by walkers; Rick must confront an enemy more dangerous than... [More]

Critics Consensus: The Commonwealth gets explored and proves too good to be true while "Out of the Ashes" is a believably fine table-setting installment, befitting a season that has been more solid than gutsy so far.
Synopsis: Aaron, Carol, Lydia, and Jerry go to the Hilltop ruins for blacksmith tools and nearby game; Eugene's group goes through... [More]

Critics Consensus:
Synopsis: Glenn knows too much for his comfort level; Daryl finds a sign of life and tries to make it back... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Triggerfinger" picks up its pace considerably, offering new adversaries, moral quandaries, and gruesome thrills, even if it doesn't finish as strong as it begins.
Synopsis: Enemies trap Rick, Hershel and Glenn, who fight to survive; when everyone realizes she is missing, Shane goes after Lori... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Wrath" begins predictably and ends twistedly as it tidily closes out the "all-out-war" arc that's been creeping throughout TWD season 8, presenting a cliffhanger that goes against the grain of several lead characters and the series itself.
Synopsis: The communities join forces in the last stand against the Saviors as all-out war unfolds.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Big Scary U" slows down the action to spend some quality time with -- and thereby humanize -- two of its much-maligned cast members.
Synopsis: A close look at Negan and the lives of the Saviors during the conflict through a familiar set of eyes.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "What Comes After" serves as an emotionally raw and rousing farewell to series lead Andrew Lincoln, though some viewers may find Rick Grimes' ambiguous departure more of a cop out than a relief.
Synopsis: Rick is forced to face the past as he struggles to maintain the safety of the communities and protect the... [More]
Directed By: Greg Nicotero

Critics Consensus: "Hearts Still Beating" corrects course after a frustrating first half to The Walking Dead's seventh season, using an improved pace and some welcome narrative jolts to set up a hopeful, rousing conclusion.
Synopsis: Negan's unwelcome visit to Alexandria continues as other members scavenge for supplies; things quickly spin out of control.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Say Yes" features an enjoyable side trip with Rick and Michonne, as well as surprises, a few laughs, and some good zombie action.
Synopsis: The group scavenges for supplies; back in Alexandria, someone must make a morally challenging decision.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Something of a filler episode for The Walking Dead, "Always Accountable" comes to life in its final moments with an exciting cliffhanger.
Synopsis: Daryl, Abraham and Sasha encounter many obstacles and a new threat while trying to return to Alexandria.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Lost and the Plunderers" takes a segmented approach to focus on individual characters -- albeit with mixed results.
Synopsis: Groups unite their forces and converge on the Hilltop; Aaron and Enid search for allies; Simon takes matters into his... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Sing Me a Song" propels TWD forward by returning to multiple storylines and revealing substantial layers of Negan's character and influence.
Synopsis: A deeper look at the Sanctuary and the world of the Saviors; members of Alexandria look for supplies.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Save the Last One" provides a welcome return to serious scares and also manages to find some humor among the horror.
Synopsis: The group awaits Shane's return; Shane finds himself trapped in a school; Daryl and Andrea search for someone in the... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Stradivarius" efficiently sets the board for promising developments and provides a welcome spotlight for Daryl Dixon, but some viewers may feel The Walking Dead is sacrificing organic narrative development and stalling for time with contrivances.
Synopsis: Carol seeks out an old friend living alone in a wilderness teeming with walkers; survivors make the perilous trek to... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Bounty" rekindles The Walking Dead's knack for a lighthearted shaggy dog story and hair-raising horror set-piece, but some viewers may come away dissatisfied with the installment's teasing of a clash that never materializes.
Synopsis: The savage group led by Alpha confronts the Hilltop in a harrowing attempt to retrieve her daughter; a supply run... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Omega" utilizes an unreliable narrator to flesh out the zombie skin-clad fanatic Alpha and succeeds at making her all the more unnerving, but some viewers may find the episode's flashback structure and side plots to be more laborious than revelatory.
Synopsis: A new arrival at the Hilltop opens up about the leader of a group of mask-wearing savages; a search party... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Grove" starts slow but finishes strong, concluding with one of the most affecting moments in The Walking Dead's twisted history.
Synopsis: After finding and establishing a new shelter, members of the group consider things returning to how they were before; Carol... [More]

Critics Consensus:
Synopsis: Realizing they're running out of supplies, the group must make a choice when security is threatened; Andrea goes to the... [More]

Critics Consensus: Focusing on the farewell of one of the series' original characters, "Honor" delivers an emotional mid-season premiere.
Synopsis: Rick faces new difficulties after a battle; the fight continues in other communities as core members face hard decisions.... [More]

Critics Consensus: The introduction of new characters and a face-off (or eye-off) between The Governor and Michonne make "Made to Suffer" a gripping episode as season three enters its mid-season break.
Synopsis: Andrea steps up when the people of Woodbury are thrown into uncharted territory; a new threat arises at the prison.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Distance" is an improvement over the previous episode with an exciting new direction, even if the plot itself is somewhat confusing.
Synopsis: After withstanding a spectacular storm, Rick and the others meet what appears to be a friendly person, but find themselves... [More]

Critics Consensus: "TS-19" closes out The Walking Dead's debut season by offering the answers to key questions while advancing the show's overall arc.
Synopsis: Rick and the group are allowed into the CDC by a strange doctor; all is not what it seems in... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Guardians" presents dual stories of tested leadership with thematic resonance and provides the malevolent Alpha a plump opportunity to demonstrate her villainy -- although The Walking Dead is still withholding crucial context from viewers longing to understand the motivations of their heroes.
Synopsis: While one community struggles to ease tensions that threaten to divide from within, the true nature of another group comes... [More]

Critics Consensus: The Walking Dead delivers an unnerving midseason cliffhanger -- and a new and terrifying threat -- although some viewers may feel that the ghoulish Whisperers are a retread of the same old antagonists with a new, rotting face.
Synopsis: A small rescue mission braves a dangerous herd in their hunt for a missing comrade, only to discover a surprising... [More]

Critics Consensus: Though its myriad of lingering questions will no doubt frustrate fans, the introduction of the outrageously entertaining Princess breathes new life into TWD as "The Tower" finds the series switching gears to great effect.
Synopsis: The communities prepare for the final battle of the Whisperer War; meanwhile, Eugene's group encounters Princess.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Who Are You Now?" swiftly establishes a new world order in The Walking Dead without Rick Grimes, effectively conveying the progression of the survivors, but some viewers may feel adrift in what feels like the umpteenth re-set for the series.
Synopsis: The survivors encounter unfamiliar faces outside the safety of their community's walls and must decide whether or not this new... [More]
Directed By: Larry Teng

Critics Consensus:
Synopsis: The group learns that a truce with the Governor must come with a huge sacrifice on their part; Rick decides... [More]

Critics Consensus: Michonne is given an admirable, mostly successful departure from The Walking Dead as "What We Become" delivers a series of fascinatingly trippy "What If" scenarios from her past.
Synopsis: Michonne takes Virgil back to his mysterious island to reunite with his family; in exchange, Virgil promises weapons that could... [More]

Critics Consensus: "After" finds The Walking Dead in a more contemplative mode, and provides a fascinating glimpse into Michonne's backstory.
Synopsis: Rick and Carl look for shelter while Rick deals with old wounds; those left at the prison consider whether survival... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Conquer" addresses some unresolved issues with suspense and, as a good finale should, paves the way for season six, even if it leaves a few threads untied.
Synopsis: Daryl finds trouble while on a run; Rick and the group feel like outsiders in Alexandria, where trouble approaches the... [More]

Critics Consensus: "New Best Friends" balances absurdity and dramatic tension as it introduces a bizarrely entertaining new community, even if some moments feel forced and contrived.
Synopsis: While searching for a missing Alexandrian, Rick and his group encounter a mysterious collective, its inhabitants unlike any they have... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The First Day of the Rest of Your Life" overcomes sporadic doldrums with an action-packed battle sequence, satisfying and innovative storytelling, and impressively imaginative use of a tiger.
Synopsis: The stakes continue to grow higher as paths cross; the group enacts an intricate plan.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Continuing the slow burn of The Walking Dead's fifth season, "Crossed" highlights the whole cast in preparation for what should be a humdinger of a mid-season finale.
Synopsis: The group is spread thin with some members holding down the church and the others on a rescue mission.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Opening with some of TWD's most unsettling imagery to date, "Ghosts" ratchets up the tension with a heady, psychologically-driven story.
Synopsis: The threat of the Whisperers return leads to paranoia sweeping over Alexandria; in the meantime, Carol battles with the need... [More]

Critics Consensus: Thanks to a more focused narrative and effectively scripted character work, "18 Miles Out" is one of the strongest episodes of the season.
Synopsis: Rick and Shane are in conflict over the fate of an outsider; Andrea helps Hershel's daughter face a crucial decision.... [More]

Critics Consensus: An emotionally lacerating installment of The Walking Dead provides crucial backstory for the series' new status quo with a flashback structure that culminates in a shocking set-piece that will leave even the most hard-bitten fans shaken.
Synopsis: An outsider's arrival forces Alexandria to rehash devastating old wounds; eye-opening secrets from the past are revealed.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Rick's meltdown in "Try" creates a compelling setup for season five's finale, even if comes off a bit extreme.
Synopsis: When life within the walls begins to mimic life outside, the group realizes that sheltered life may not be possible.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Key" injects interesting new characters and action into TWD season 8's ongoing arc of betrayal, though the series sorely needs to break some predictable patterns.
Synopsis: Hilltop's leadership faces a difficult dilemma after the arrival of unexpected visitors; Rick comes face to face with an adversary.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Moving performances by Lennie James and Melissa McBride as their characters get their mojo back move the season's arc forward in "Bury Me Here," though the pacing is slow and their journeys seem relatively implausible.
Synopsis: Things do not go as planned when a group of Kingdommers delivers goods to the Saviors during a routine supply... [More]

Critics Consensus: In the Robert Kirkman-penned "Isolation," the prison survivors start to pick up the pieces while Tyreese and Carol are pushed in interesting directions.
Synopsis: A group leaves the prison to search for supplies; the remaining members of the group deal with recent losses.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Jeffrey Dean Morgan's chemistry with real-life partner Hilarie Burton adds a bittersweet authenticity to "Here's Negan," a strong season finale that brings shades of humanity to one of The Walking Dead's most irredeemable characters.
Synopsis: With Maggie back at Alexandria, Carol takes Negan on a journey to minimize the increasing tension; here, Negan reflects on... [More]

Critics Consensus: Slow-burning and suspenseful, "Claimed" also further develops the deepening friendship between Michonne and Carl.
Synopsis: Rick faces a number of threats while Carl and Michonne look for supplies; Glenn and Tara meet strangers on an... [More]

Critics Consensus: While it may slow the season's pace, "Hostiles and Calamities" takes a tense look inside previously unexplored Savior lives, advancing one character's logical and much-needed moral transformation.
Synopsis: An Alexandrian discovers they must navigate the mysterious, confusing and terrifying world within the Saviors' compound.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Four Walls and a Roof" maintains the brisk pace and suspenseful tone that the The Walking Dead has established in its fifth season.
Synopsis: Rick and the others find themselves pitted against a nasty group but may have a plan to gain the upper... [More]

Critics Consensus: With the shocking loss of two main characters, "Killer Within" doesn't hold back on delivering finale-level action.
Synopsis: The group becomes severed, putting lives in jeopardy; in Woodbury, Merle approaches the Governor to make a request.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Spend" dismantles any false sense of security obtained by its characters by reveling in blood splatter with a fatal, jolting disruption of the status quo.
Synopsis: While trying to secure a new home, Rick and his group face challenges, and question the utopia they find themselves... [More]

Critics Consensus: It remains murky whether these bonus installments will have a life of their own, but "Home Sweet Home" gracefully returns Lauren Cohan into the fold.
Synopsis: Maggie returns, to the dismay of Negan; the trials she endured since leaving have made her harder in order for... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Look at the Flowers" dives back into the conflict between the Hilltop crew and the Whisperers with a richly introspective episode that explores the far-reaching impact of Alpha's demise.
Synopsis: Heroes and villains reckon with the aftermath of the Hilltop fire; Eugene takes a group on a journey to meet... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Too Far Gone" delivers an epic mid-season finale, offering a forceful charge of pace that adds new emotional undertones to the characters' journey.
Synopsis: Things finally begin to calm at the prison until Rick and the group face imminent danger when the Governor arrives... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Indifference" takes it to the street as survivors search for supplies, in an episode successfully driven by human drama and culminating in a high-stakes choice between Rick and Carol.
Synopsis: Daryl and a small group set out on foot in search of medicine, but their mission faces obstacles; Rick and... [More]

Critics Consensus: Incorporating a growing sense of optimism into the bleakness of its continuing arc, "Rock in the Road" is an energized and amusing setup for a climactic, imminent war.
Synopsis: Rick and the others are led to a new community, where they meet the residents and their ruler; a familiar... [More]

Critics Consensus: The Whisperers are finally shushed for good in "A Certain Doom," a tidy climax that efficiently dispenses with old enemies while teeing up a fresh crop of antagonists.
Synopsis: Beta engages the final battle of the Whisperer War.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Tense, atmospheric, and slow-burning, "Consumed" occasionally overdoses on flashbacks but manages to convey psychological depth while making the most of its urban setting.
Synopsis: Stakes are high when members of the group must go on a heroic rescue mission in a previously known location.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Although mainly another hour of moving pieces into place, "Hounded" sees the prison and Woodbury plotines converge, setting up an exciting collision course for the mid-season break.
Synopsis: Andrea and the Governor grow closer while Michonne makes a decision about Woodbury; Glenn and Maggie go on a run;... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Internment" is highlighted by a great twist ending and Scott Wilson's performance as Hershel, who experiences a powerful emotional arc.
Synopsis: Assorted enemies pressure Rick and the group; the survivors and the prison may reach a breaking point.... [More]

Critics Consensus: While packed with several gripping plot threads, a rewarding showcase of Negan is what truly makes "What It Always Is" a stand out episode of the season.
Synopsis: Supplies go missing from Hilltop; Negan is idolized by an Alexandrian; Ezekiel holds a secret.... [More]

Critics Consensus: While heavy on flashbacks, "We Are the End of the World" unveils a dark, thoughtfully constructed exploration of the Whisperer's origins.
Synopsis: A flashback reveals the origins of Alpha and Beta; Alpha attempts to toughen up Lydia as they prepare to walk... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Still" focuses entirely on Daryl and Beth, and the result is one of the most intimate and character-driven installments in the series' run.
Synopsis: In the woods after fleeing the prison, Beth makes a request that sends her and Daryl on an enlightening mission.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Worth" briskly cleans house to varying degrees of satisfaction, setting the stage for what could be one of the series' most explosive finales -- assuming the show finally follows through on its promise of All Out War.
Synopsis: With the threat of the Saviors still looming, Aaron continues searching for allies; Daryl and Rosita take action and confront... [More]

Critics Consensus: An early climax for The Walking Dead's final season, "For Blood" stages a rousing confrontation against the Reaper threat - with a couple of gruesome surprises thrown into the mix.
Synopsis: The Reapers defend Meridian from an incoming herd; Pope suspects Maggie is behind the attack, while Daryl treads carefully; Alexandrians... [More]

Critics Consensus: A somewhat anticlimatic and uneven effort, "The World Before" still manages to leave the door open for a engaging slate of plot threads in the second half of TWD's 10th season.
Synopsis: A fight causes tensions in Oceanside while the Alexandrians set out on a high-stakes mission.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Us" has labored moments but proves a necessary episode overall, with newly introduced characters woven into advancing storylines.
Synopsis: Daryl struggles to fit in with his new group while Glenn finds Maggie's messages and races to catch up to... [More]

Critics Consensus: Hell freezes over in a wintry The Walking Dead finale that takes full advantage of "The Storm" with some chilly scares and a meditative, mournful tone -- although this elegiac installment arguably would have best worked as a preamble instead of a denouement.
Synopsis: In the aftermath of an overwhelming loss, the communities must brave a ferocious blizzard; as one group deals with an... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Chokepoint" brings a welcome dose of crunchy action to The Walking Dead, spotlighting Norman Reedus' physicality while introducing an intriguing new gang of rogues into the mix.
Synopsis: Daryl's daring rescue mission forces Alpha to unleash a group of her own to retrieve what belongs to her, even... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Obliged" continues the season's streak of excellent episodes, bolstered by a bittersweet performance from Andrew Lincoln.
Synopsis: Rick's vision of a civilized future is threatened by a sudden reckoning with past sins that remain unavenged and unforgiven.... [More]

#53
Critics Consensus: A finale that feels like a fresh start, "A" raises the narrative stakes without taking itself too seriously - and brings the season to a tense, fast-paced conclusion.
Synopsis: Many paths collide on each group's travels; Rick remembers the past and faces sheer brutality; the group struggles to survive.... [More]

Critics Consensus: A big ending on "What Lies Ahead" gets the second season of The Walking Dead off to a strong start.
Synopsis: Rick leads the group out of Atlanta; the group is stopped by a threat unlike anything anyone has seen before;... [More]

Critics Consensus: By keeping its focus on a fan favorite, "Some Guy" delivers a compelling -- though ultimately heartbreaking -- episode.
Synopsis: A new weapon in the Savior arsenal proves to be a giant hurdle as fighting continues between Rick's forces and... [More]

Critics Consensus: Maggie veers into the dark side in a tense episode that features a show-stopping set piece on a train and intriguing shades of moral gray.
Synopsis: Maggie's mission takes the team through a subway tunnel, challenged by lurking walkers and a recalcitrant Negan; with Eugene's group,... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Vatos" establishes an early Walking Dead benchmark, with plenty of action, rising character arcs, and a final scene that packs a wallop.
Synopsis: Another group of survivors threatens Rick, Daryl, T-Dog and Glenn, sending Rick's mission to Atlanta awry; Jim becomes unhinged back... [More]

Critics Consensus: With "Wildfire," The Walking Dead continues to prove it isn't your average horror story, with a focus on three-dimensional characters in a well-rounded drama.
Synopsis: Rick leads the group to the CDC hoping to cure an infected Jim, who must make a terrible life-and-death decision.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Calm Before" exemplifies everything that The Walking Dead does best - bittersweetly affirming the bonds of a makeshift community and finding glimmers humanity in a nihilistic landscape before dropping a horrifying twist that will leave viewers reeling long after.
Synopsis: The fair at the Kingdom is underway, with all four communities coming together in celebration for the first time in... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Mercy" mixes mysterious time-hopping sequences with explosive action to create a more hopeful premiere than previous seasons of The Walking Dead.
Synopsis: Rick and his group, along with the Kingdom and Hilltop, have banded together to bring the fight to Negan and... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Here's Not Here" is a stand-out installment of The Walking Dead, using Morgan's backstory as a powerful reminder of what it means to be human.
Synopsis: Morgan recalls his travels from King County to Alexandria, where he encountered a solo survivor who taught him a new... [More]

Critics Consensus: This installment of The Walking Dead doesn't contain a whole lot of chomp, but it effectively entwines disparate plot threads in a way that promises a big payoff soon enough.
Synopsis: Maggie and Elijah learn a new survival tactic from Negan; Eugene's group clears walkers to pay their fines; Yumiko interviews... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Tell it to the Frogs" restores the show's focus on character-driven drama, getting a groundbreaking season of unique horror storytelling back on track.
Synopsis: Rick goes back to Atlanta to save a man's life; Lori and Shane deal with the surprise return of someone... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Beside the Dying Fire" is a suspense-filled finale that balances narrative twists and zombie action while rounding out one arc and setting up another.
Synopsis: Rick and Carl find the farm in jeopardy; the group is split up in the chaos; Rick's leadership is questioned.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Maggie and Negan's longstanding feud takes center stage in "Acheron: Part One," a solid premiere that kickstarts The Walking Dead's final season with some bite.
Synopsis: Daryl leads a mission team to scavenge the military base he discovered; Maggie tells her story, prompting a new mission... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Adaptation" creepily fleshes out the Whisperers beyond their rotting camouflage to chilling effect and teases that redemption for the irredeemable Negan may be possible -- adding up to a solid and satisfying return for The Walking Dead.
Synopsis: The communities thought they could build a better future separately, but the recent loss of one of their own drives... [More]

Critics Consensus: A knockout opener to The Walking Dead's sixth season, "First Time Again" has everything one would hope for - including intense plot development, entertaining character interplay, and more zombies than ever before.
Synopsis: Rick and the others have a difficult time assimilating into Alexandria; a new threat arises that could bring the group... [More]

Critics Consensus: "30 Days Without an Accident" uses its deliberate pace to dramatically build tension while advancing character psychology.
Synopsis: The group lives a more peaceful life at the prison and strives to hold onto humanity; problems arise when Rick... [More]

Critics Consensus:
Synopsis: Secrets are told and revealed; Hershel refuses to acknowledge the world's new reality; Andrea comes out of her shell; everything... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Lines We Cross" sets the stage for TWD's 10th season with a fierce momentum that delivers equally on satisfying character moments and tense plotting.
Synopsis: The group in Oceanside continues to train in case the Whisperers return; tensions are high as the heroes struggle to... [More]

Critics Consensus: Carried by its charming cast, Modern Love sweet and simple sensibilities are easy enough to enjoy, even if its quaint portrait of modern life in New York City doesn't always ring true.
Synopsis: A medical emergency proves traumatic and leaves a life hanging in the balance; Rick and the group discover a potential... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Silence The Whisperers" offers a meditative focus on the developments of some lesser characters, all while continuing this season's compelling narrative thrust.
Synopsis: Still-paranoid Alexandrians get riled up over the Whisperers and take their fear out on Negan; at Hilltop, the group deals... [More]

Critics Consensus: Before ending with a spectacular cliff-hanger, "Morning Star" pits the Hilltop crew against the Whisperers in a skillfully staged battle that promises a bloody end to this season.
Synopsis: The Whisperers are coming for Hilltop; after Daryl and Lydia's encounter with Alpha, the communities must decide whether to run... [More]

Critics Consensus: Following a swift and violent conclusion to last week's harrowing battle, "Walk With Us" delivers a restless aftermath marked by stunning characters deaths and unanticipated twists.
Synopsis: With Negan's help, Alpha and the Whisperers attack Hilltop.... [More]

Critics Consensus: Vintage-style action and the spark of a hot new romance make "The Next World" a gratifying successor to the shocking mid-season premiere.
Synopsis: A simple scavenging run proves to be more tricky, when the survivors are not the only ones after a goldmine... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Thank You" is an example of what The Walking Dead does best, combining gripping action with troubling existential questions in a heart-wrenching plot twist.
Synopsis: A small group, including Rick, runs into hurdles while trying to return to Alexandria, and some may not make it... [More]

Critics Consensus: Though it ultimately sets up more than it pays off, "Bonds" introduces a contentious dynamic between Negan and Alpha that offers some of this season's more memorable character moments.
Synopsis: Carol and Daryl go on a mission together while Siddiq struggles to solve a mystery.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Squeeze" returns viewers to the 10th season of TWD with a heart-stoppingly claustrophobic story that finds time to enrich the strong dynamic between Carol and Daryl.
Synopsis: The group must figure out how to get out of a precarious situation.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Open Your Eyes" fulfills the potential of the foundations laid earlier in this season with a surprising character death and some ingenious twists.
Synopsis: Carol pushes boundaries that make Daryl uncomfortable; Alpha and Beta have reservations about someone.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Well" brings a welcome reprieve from the brutality of the season premiere, introducing a colorful new character and focusing on two of The Walking Dead's most fascinating regulars.
Synopsis: For a number of familiar faces, a new, well-established community seems too good to be true.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Knots Untie" is an excellent, albeit unevenly scripted, foundation for the dangerous and degenerative societal clash it foreshadows.
Synopsis: After realizing that Alexandria may not be as safe as he originally thought, Rick must make decisions about where to... [More]

Critics Consensus: An informational, narrative episode, "Forget" focuses on character relations while an ominous threat looms outside the confines of the core group.
Synopsis: As Rick and the others continue to acclimate to their new surroundings, they consider a return to normalcy.... [More]

Critics Consensus: By returning to its roots, "A New Beginning" pumps fresh blood into TWD and inspires hope for a brighter future.
Synopsis: Rick and his group make a risky run into Washington, D.C. to search for artifacts they will need to build... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Not Tomorrow Yet" tests viewers' patience with slow-building tension -- and delivers with a powerful, action-packed ending.
Synopsis: Rick and the others determine that the only way to keep peace in Alexandria, is to wage a war with... [More]

Critics Consensus: "The Same Boat" takes a strong female focus by continuing Carol's arc while deepening viewer anticipation for Negan's ominous arrival.
Synopsis: After a minor success, two members of the group are taken hostage; Carol struggles morally with the lengths she has... [More]

Critics Consensus: Loaded with thrilling action, "JSS" is a terrific example of The Walking Dead making the most of its varied characters.
Synopsis: When it appears that things are starting to normalize in the settlement, a new problem arises for the Alexandrians.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "No Way Out" is a brutally entertaining rebound from a lackluster first half of the season, re-energized with arresting, jaw-dropping developments.
Synopsis: Now that walkers have shown up inside the gates of Alexandria, Rick and the other survivors are scared and outnumbered.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Say the Word" takes a step back from the action of the last episode, while driving home major plot points for the season going forward.
Synopsis: Rick struggles after another loss; Michonne grows more suspicious of the Governor, who throws a party for the people of... [More]

Critics Consensus: Seth Gilliam and Ross Marquand shine in a self-contained adventure that lulls viewers with some refreshing male bonding before turning the tables with a shocking twist.
Synopsis: With Maggie's map, Gabriel and Aaron search for food and supplies to bring back to Alexandria; checking out one more... [More]

Critics Consensus: The Walking Dead's debut delivers intense horror set apart by its focus on tragedy and the human condition -- not to mention awesome zombie kills.
Synopsis: Rick searches for his family after emerging from a coma; Morgan and Duane help teach Rick the new rules for... [More]
Directed By: Frank Darabont

Critics Consensus: Supported by outstanding performances, "Better Angels" delivers a superb payoff to one of the show's central conflicts and foreshadows a chilling season finale.
Synopsis: When the group learns that someone dangerous may be loose near the farm, Rick, Shane, Daryl and Glenn try to... [More]

Critics Consensus: While the Reapers have yet to coalesce into a memorable threat, "On the Inside" enthralls with a horror house set piece that will terrify even the most hardened Walking Dead fans.
Synopsis: Escaping from walkers, Connie and Virgil hide in a house occupied by mysterious creatures; Pope tests Daryl's loyalty to the... [More]

Critics Consensus: In The Walking Dead's season five premiere, "No Sanctuary" delivered an action-packed resolution to last season's cliffhanger while deepening our understanding of Rick and Carol.
Synopsis: The true motives of the Terminans come to light when Rick and the others end up in a vulnerable situation.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Infected" kicks the rejuvenated show into overdrive, skillfully contrasting big horror-action set pieces with intimate character development.
Synopsis: Facing a new enemy, Rick abandons his quiet lifestyle so that he and the others can fight to protect their... [More]

Critics Consensus: Season three of The Walking Dead responds to its audience's call to action with "Seed," an action-packed premiere.
Synopsis: As the world grows more dangerous and Lori's pregnancy advances, Rick locates a potentially safe haven.... [More]

Critics Consensus: After an explosive premiere, The Walking Dead's "Strangers" settles into a groove with a more deliberate, dialogue-heavy episode.
Synopsis: Rick leads a risky mission for a possible small reward when the supplies run low and the group's mistrust of... [More]

Critics Consensus: With excellent acting and compelling dialogue, "Self Help" is a rewarding adaptation of the comic book as well as an expertly crafted hour of television.
Synopsis: The group must contend with a new set of issues while out on a mission, and must push through to... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Walk With Me" takes a welcome break from Rick and the prison to introduce season three's highly anticipated new villain, The Governor.
Synopsis: Andrea and Michonne witness an accident that leads them to a new group of survivors, but when tensions arise with... [More]

Critics Consensus: A change of scenery and a stronger sense of story make "Clear" one of seasonthree's best episodes so far.
Synopsis: Realizing they are outgunned, Rick leads an expedition to get more weapons and fortify their group against the Governor and... [More]

Critics Consensus: Fueled by a thrillingly brutal confrontation between Daryl and Alpha, "Stalker" showcases a nerve-wracking flashpoint that brings the tensions of the incoming Whisperer War to a simmering boil.
Synopsis: The group must defend Alexandria from a threatening outside force.... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Warning Signs" balances skillfully built suspense with rare moments of respite to create one of the best installments of The Walking Dead in years.
Synopsis: Rick's vision for the future is threatened by a mysterious disappearance that divides the work camp where the communities are... [More]

Critics Consensus: A slower burn than the premiere, "The Bridge" is a compelling character study that lays necessary foundations for future installments.
Synopsis: The communities join forces to restore a bridge that will facilitate communication and trade; someone is gravely injured at the... [More]

Critics Consensus: "Remember" adds extra elements of excitement and surprise to the season with new characters, new developments, and a surplus of thrilling change.
Synopsis: The group has a difficult time molding to a new lifestyle, forcing them to consider whether they can be the... [More]

Critics Consensus: The anticipation is palpable as "When the Dead Come Knocking" effectively brings Team Prison and Team Woodbury together for a mid-season showdown.
Synopsis: A new guest at the prison forces Rick's hand; members of the group go on a mission to rescue Glenn... [More]

Critics Consensus: A visually impressive episode of The Walking Dead, "What Happened and What's Going On" artfully portrays the psychology of the characters, rather than focusing on its shocking moments.
Synopsis: After facing all of the recent trials, a slight detour may offer the solution that the group has been seeking.... [More]

Two beloved series bid adieu this month on NBC and AMC, while we welcome in much-anticipated sophomore seasons from the likes of Comedy Central, HBO Max, Showtime, and more. With plenty of binge-worthy series to go around, let’s break down what you should be catching up on this August.


What it is: From creators Michele Abbott, Ilene Chaiken, and Kathy Greenberg, the original Emmy-nominated series (decorated elsewhere by GLAAD for its landmark lesbian, bisexual, and transgender characters) and its years-in-the-making sequel series, The L Word: Generation Q, charts the intersecting friendships and love lives of a group of queer women living in Los Angeles.

Why you should watch it: As heralded today as it is maligned, there’s no denying that The L Word made leaps for LGBTQ representation onscreen upon its 2004 premiere, even if it didn’t always hit its mark. While its first season was Certified Fresh for all its bombastic soapiness and memorable characters, critics didn’t follow it into its subsequent seasons, resulting in years without Tomatometer scores — and its sixth and final season was ravaged with a measly 8%. But the show still has its fans and its merits. Plus, its reboot welcomely (and freshly) revisits the components that first made us fall in love with these ladies (including original stars Katherine Moennig and Jennifer Beals) while expanding and bettering itself where there is room to grow. The L Word: Generation Q season 2 premieres August 8 on Showtime.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, ShowtimeVudu

Commitment: Approx. 77.5 hours (for all six seasons of The L Word and The L Word: Generation Q season 1)


What it is: Based on the character from the DC Comics by Geoff Johns and Lee Moder, DC’s Stargirl follows teenager Courtney Whitmore, who, upon discovering the Cosmic Staff and learning that her stepfather was once sidekick to Starman, takes up the cause of the Justice Society of America and recruits a whole new crew of superheroes to join her cause.

Why you should watch it: Already renewed for a third season before its second even airs, star Brec Bassinger has woven some superpowered magic with her hit DC Universe–turned–CW series. With action and family-friendly fun for all ages, it strikes an inspiring narrative of the powers of good that can rise up in the face of evil. Season 2 premieres August 10 on the CW.

Where to watch: AmazonGoogle Play, HBO MaxMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 9.5 hours (for the first season)


What it is: This hit comedy series from creators Dan Goor and Michael Schur is a workplace sitcom featuring some very distinct personalities — the aloof and gregarious Detective Jake Peralta (Saturday Night Live alum Andy Samberg), his fictional precinct’s dry commanding officer, Captain Ray Holt (Andre Braugher), and the rest of the motley crew of the Nine-Nine.

Why you should watch it: We’ve seen fan-initiated primetime resuscitations before, but rarely do they happen as swiftly as Brooklyn Nine-Nine’s after its unceremonious cancellation at Fox. The online outcry had barely begun before Universal Television began shopping the sitcom around, and it was scooped up by NBC just a day later — with good reason. The series is beloved by fans, which is why it comes as particularly sad news that its eighth season, premiering August 12, will also be its last.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, PeacockVudu

Commitment: Approx. 52 hours (for the first seven seasons)


What it is: This series is centered on its titular group of young superheroes — led by none other than Nightwing (formerly Robin of Batman-sidekick fame) — as they save the world from forces that want to end it. A long-in-the-making effort, Titans is a welcome addition to DC Comics’ TV footprint.

Why you should watch it: Greg Berlanti is the mastermind behind DC Comics’ takeover of the small screen, so you know you’re in good hands for this streaming hit with him and co-creators Akiva Goldsman and Geoff Johns (also of Stargirl fame) at the helm. The Titans action is slick and laid on thick, and buoyed by a stellar young-Hollywood cast. We can’t wait to see what superhero adventures are in store next. Season 3 premieres August 12 on HBO Max.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HBO MaxVudu

Commitment: Approx. 18 hours (for the first two seasons)


What it is: From director and showrunner John Carney (best known for musical romances Once, Begin Again, and Sing Street) and based on the New York Times’s much-loved column of the same name, Modern Love is a anthological series charting the love lives of various disparate New Yorkers played by the likes of Tina Fey, Anne Hathaway, Dev Patel, Catherine Keener, and more.

Why you should watch it: The acting talent alone is enough reason to tune in, but this series packs on the charm in ways both expected and surprising, sending its material over the edge from just basic rom-com fare to something a little more special. Season 2 premieres August 13 on Amazon Prime Video.

Where to watch: Amazon

Commitment: Approx. 4 hours (for the first season)


What it is: Creator Awkwafina stars here as Nora Lin, a Flushing, Queens, native comically trying to get her young adulthood life together with the help of some family and friends.

Why you should watch it: Fresh off the breakout acclaim of Crazy Rich Asians and The Farewell, Awkwafina’s self-titled Comedy Central series became the latest semi-autobiographical half-hour to take a hold of us. With supporting and scene-stealing turns from BD Wong, Lori Tan Chinn, and Bowen Yang as her father, grandmother, and cousin respectively, it’s a series that showcases the universality of coming-of-age. Season 2 premieres August 18 on Comedy Central.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayHBO Max, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours (for the first season)


What it is: Don’t know what The Walking Dead is? You may want to check your pulse…

Why you should watch it: Based on the comic book series by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie Adlard’s post-apocalyptic premise of zombies walking the Earth and ending mankind as we know it, the acclaimed series developed by creator Frank Darabont indulges in gore and “what if” fascinations. These are characters brought to life with bone-deep precision from a stable of some of TV’s greatest talents. You just never know when your favorite will bite the dust, but that’s admittedly part of the fun, too. Its eleventh and final season premieres August 22 on AMC.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 114 hours (for the first 10 seasons)


What it is: Following the highs and lows of a self-proclaimed fat, queer dyke who suffers from OCD and depression while living in Chicago, co-creator and star Abby McEnany turns the lens inward and makes one heck of a debut.

Why you should watch it: Not many entertainers can say they had their “mainstream” breakout after 50, but McEnany can count herself among the lucky few. A mainstay of Chicago’s comedy scene via Second City and a one-time student of Stephen Colbert, the multi-hyphenate finds ways to turn the cringingly personal into universal reflections on contemporary humanity. Season 2 premieres August 22 on Showtime.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOWGoogle Play, HuluMicrosoft, ShowtimeVudu

Commitment: Approx. 4 hours (for the first season)


What it is: From director Kwang Il Han and based on the book series by Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski, The Witcher: Nightmare of the Wolf is a prequel spinoff film of Netflix’s hit Henry Cavill starrer from creator Lauren Schmidt that charts the monster-slaying adventures of Geralt’s mentor, Vesemir, in stunning anime.

Why you should watch it: If you haven’t already read the source material, we recommend the best way to catch up for this feature is to binge the first season of The Witcher. Ambitiously violent and larger-than-life, it certainly ranks as one of Netflix’s best fantasy series and will give you all the knowledge you need to appreciate this animated vision of what came before. The Witcher: Nightmare of the Wolf premieres August 23 on Netflix. (Season 2 of the live-action series premieres on December 17.)

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 8 hours (for the first season)


What it is: Now going into its 10th season, the spooky anthology series is a favorite of critics and audiences alike. Previous seasons featured haunted houses, witches, vampires, crazed killers, and every manner of unhinged human.

Why you should watch it: You don’t have to watch every season of American Horror Story to catch up for season 10, but don’t you want to!? The acclaimed anthology series is known for being as campy as it is horrific. The upcoming season, American Horror Story: Double Feature, is divided in two parts for two times the fun; one half is set by the sea, the other by the sand. Returning stars to the franchise include Sarah Paulson and Evan Peters after taking a break from 1984, Frances Conroy, Leslie Grossman, Billie Lourd, Lily Rabe, Angelica Ross, Finn Wittrock, Denis O’Hare, Matt Bomer, and more. Season 10 premieres August 25 on FX.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 85 hours (for the first nine seasons)


What it is: Even the sleekest of action-packed espionage thrillers have an air of cartoonish hyperbole to them, but FXX’s Archer does away with that suspension of disbelief by making the whole thing a cartoon to begin with. The half-hour comedy from creator Adam Reed can land a joke as deftly as its titular man-child spy can land a punch, so expect to be thrilled while laughing yourself silly.

Why you should watch it: Over 11 hit seasons, Archer has never shied away from genre experimentation. Season 8’s Dreamland and 9’s Danger Island were particularly high-concept highlights, with season 10 following suit with 1999, which saw Archer not as the ass-kicking spy of ISIS we know from earlier incarnations, but a futuristic explorer of space on the M/V Seamus alongside our longstanding favorite characters and the voice actors behind them. Season 11 marked the spies much-anticipated return to reality after he wakes up from his coma and does away with those bottle-themed seasons. Season 12, which features the late, great Jessica Walter’s final bow as the voice of Malory, premieres August 25 on FXX.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 45 hours (for the first 11 seasons)


What it is: Cary (Drew Tarver), and his sister, Brooke (Heléne Yorke) had dreams of fame of fortune, but now fast-approaching 30 with not much to show for it, they’re forced to contend with overnight, Justin Bieber–style viral fame of their teen brother Chase (Case Walker).

Why you should watch it: With a never-better Molly Shannon as the central three’s supportive (but a bit delusional) mother, this laugh-out-loud series from Saturday Night Live vets Chris Kelly and Sarah Schneider parodies pop culture as much as it celebrates it — and it’s just about perfect. Season 2 premieres August 26 on HBO Max.

Where to watch: HBO Max

Commitment: Approx. 3.5 hours (for the first season)

Thumbnail photo credits: Josh Stringer/AMC; Matt Sayles/The CW; Comedy Central


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This month boasts some buzzy sophomore efforts from Fresh new series alongside the final swan songs of some small-screen gems — plus one massive The Walking Dead binge that’ll keep you busy all the way through Halloween. Check out our 10 must-watch binges of October below!


What it is: A 19th century San Francisco–set Peaky Blinders–style action-drama, Warrior follows Ah Sahm, a martial arts expert who immigrates to the U.S. from China to search for his missing sister. Portraying the city’s brutal Tong Wars, he is soon entangled with Chinatown’s most powerful organized crime family.

Why you should watch it: Originally plucked from the mind of the late, great Bruce Lee, Warrior was finally realized onscreen last year thanks to his daughter Shannon Lee, Fast and the Furious director Justin Lin, and Banshee creator Jonathan Tropper. The series runs on high-octane, gritty action, lush period set pieces, and a sprawling ensemble of memorable and complex characters — you’ll care what happens to them as the wheeling, dealing, and killing gets underway over the first season’s 10 episodes. Season 2 premieres Oct. 2 on Cinemax.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours (for the first season)


What it is: Funnyman Anthony Anderson stars as Dre Johnson, a Black, upper-middle-class family man who — in a predominantly white neighborhood, school, and culture — still wants his kids to retain a sense of black identity.

Why you should watch it: Creator Kenya Barris is a writer who boldly goes there. Even within the confines of the network TV sitcom structure, he has conjured stories over the past six seasons that are absolutely resonant, timely, fearless, and hilarious. Tracy Ellis Ross and Anderson are especially show-stealing (and Emmy-nominated several times over). Barris’ Grown-ish, and Mixed-ish also boast Certified Fresh first seasons. He’s also responsible for -ish-unleashed Netflix comedy #blackAF, which he also stars in and, though it wasn’t as popular with critics, it has a higher audience score on its first season than any of the -ish shows. Catch up on the family series that started it all before Black-ish returns with an Oct. 4 election special and its seventh season premiere Oct. 21 on ABC. Plus, watch for the upcoming Old-ish.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayHuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: 51 hours (for the first six seasons)


What it is: If you don’t know what The Walking Dead is, you may want to check your pulse…

Why you should watch it: Based on the comic book series by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie Adlard’s post-apocalyptic premise of zombies walking the Earth and ending mankind as we know it, the acclaimed series developed by creator Frank Darabont indulges in gore and “what if” fascinations. These are characters brought to life with bone-deep precision from a stable of some of TV’s greatest talents. You just never know when your favorite will bite the dust, but that’s admittedly part of the fun, too. We recommend you strap in for a super binge of this beloved franchise by first watching the original Walking Dead in the lead up to Oct. 4’s season 10 finale, which marks the return of a series-favorite: Maggie Rhee! Then make your way over to spin-off No. 1, Fear the Walking Dead, before its sixth season premieres Oct. 11, and — since you’ll surely be wanting more blood, guts, and zombie gore  — may we suggest the next addition to the franchise? The Walking Dead: The World Beyond premieres Oct. 4. The Walking Dead universe airs on AMC and streams on the network’s streaming service AMC+.

Where to watch The Walking DeadAmazon, FandangoNow, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Where to watch Fear the Walking DeadAmazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 109 hours (for the first 10 seasons of The Walking Dead) and approx. 52 hours (for the first five seasons of Fear the Walking Dead)


What it is: Ghosts, demons, and other monsters better watch out for Sam and Dean Winchester. After their mother is killed by an unknown demonic force when they are just children, the brothers’ father trains them to be soldiers against the world’s paranormal evil. Supernatural charts their journey as they hunt down and kill those otherworldly enemies.

Why you should watch it: Not all network series are lucky enough to be renewed for a second season, much less 15! It’s an astounding feat that Supernatural has accrued such a devout fanbase over the years. Creator Eric Kripke (most recently the mind behind The Boys) is a master of the genre, and we’d follow Sam and Dean (played with charisma and complexity by Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles, respectively) to just about any haunted house, vampire den, or unearthly plain they want to take us. Its season 15 rollout was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, and we’ll be sad to see it go after it returns with its final seven episodes Oct. 8 on the CW.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Microsoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 235 hours (for all 15 seasons)


What it is: Loosely based on Shirley Jackson’s 1959 novel of the same name, The Haunting of Hill House jumps between 1992 — when Hugh and Olivia Crain and their children Steven, Shirley, Theodora, Luke, and Nell move in to renovate the titular mansion — and 2018 — when the surviving family is forced to revisit their dark past with the home and the supernatural tragedies therein.

Why you should watch it: It’s not often that a horror series is universally acclaimed as a must-watch series, but The Haunting of Hill House provided some of the best and most addicting hours of television around with its 2018 Netflix launch. It really is scary as all hell — the “Bent-Neck Lady” guarantees chills that will haunt your dreams. In the spirit of the Halloween season, we recommend a binge of the first installment of this anthology series before creator Mike Flanagan does it again with an all-new story, The Haunting of Bly Manor, which premieres Oct. 9 on Netflix.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google PlayNetflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 9 hours (for the first season)


What it is: Star Trek: Discovery is set 10 years prior to the original series and in the same universe as Kirk, Spock, and the Enterprise, and sees the titular ship venturing out to discover new worlds and quell violent alien forces. As always with a Trek series, the cast of characters on board is the series’ beating heart — and you can expect some returning franchise-favorites along the way.

Why you should watch it: Creators Bryan Fuller and Alex Kurtzman, as well as star Sonequa Martin-Green and the rest of the ensemble cast faced the franchise fandom’s lofty expectations when the series premiered in September 2017. They were rewarded with Certified Fresh Tomatometer scores of 82% on season 1 and 81% on season 2.  The third season premieres Oct. 15 on CBS All Access.

Where to watch: Amazon, CBS All AccessFandangoNow, Google PlayMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 26 hours (for the first two seasons)


What it is: Revisiting one of the most famous families on network TV after over 20 years off the air, The Conners stars Laurie Metcalf, John Goodman, and the rest of the original clan (minus Roseanne Barr) and is as insightful and heartwarming as ever.

Why you should watch it: You’ll likely remember the off-screen controversy and Roseanne reboot cancellation that led to The Conners hitting the small screen, but the series quickly found its groove and audience without Barr and is still going strong with positive ratings and reviews. Telling it like it is for working-class, family-first Americans, it resonates widely in today’s divisive times, while still making us laugh.

Where to watch: FandangoNow, Google PlayHulu, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 14 hours (for the first two seasons)


What it is: Everyone knows a “work family” is essential to getting through the day-to-day, even when they’re as eccentric as the workforce of Superstore’s Walmart-esque Cloud 9. This is their story.

Why you should watch it: We’re so glad Superstore found its footing. After a promising, but slightly jumbled start out the gate, the beloved comedy series is now six seasons in and better than ever. As the central Amy, America Ferrera (who we will always stan for Ugly Betty) is a stalwart of the screen you can always count on to bring the heart and laughs. Throw in a wacky crew of other comic actors at the top of their game (no one steals a scene like Crazy Rich Asians breakout Nico Santos), and Superstore may just be her best project yet. Her departure from the series was pushed back due to the pandemic, so catch up before the coronavirus-themed season 6 premieres Oct. 22; Ferrera will be in the first two episodes before bidding Cloud 9 adieu.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google PlayHuluMicrosoft, PeacockVudu

Commitment: Approx. 36 hours (for the first five seasons)


What it is: From creator Jon Favreau and starring Pedro Pascal, Gina Carano, and Giancarlo Esposito, The Mandalorian is Star Wars’ first live-action television series. Set five years after the action of Return of the Jedi, it follows the titular Mandalorian, Din Djarin (Pascal), a lonely and mysterious bounty hunter as he traverses the outskirts of the galaxy just outside the New Republic’s reach.

Why you should watch it: Two words: Baby. Yoda. But that criminally cute, internet-famous creature aside, The Mandalorian is the best thing to happen in a galaxy far, far away in a very, very long time. A Western action-adventure that both reboots the Star Wars universe while reinvigorating the aspects we’ve loved about it all along, the series truly has something for everyone. And the industry at large agrees: Who had “The Mandalorian scores an Emmy nomination for outstanding drama series” on their 2020 bingo card!? Season 2 premieres Oct. 30 on Disney+.

Where to watch: Disney+

Commitment: Approx. 5.5 hours (for the first season)

On an Apple device? Follow Rotten Tomatoes on Apple News.

Fall TV is still in full swing this month, which means more and more shows for your viewing pleasure. While you decide which new ones to tune into, catch up on the 13 series below — all of which are Certified Fresh returnees with zombies, superheroes, and brainiacs to spare. 


Sorry For Your Loss 94% (Facebook Watch)

What it is: Elizabeth Olsen stars as Leigh Shaw, a widow in mourning who, unable to bear living in the apartment she shared with husband, quits her job as a magazine writer and moves in with her mother. What follows is a nuanced character study of those left behind in death’s wake.

Why you should watch it: It’s not easy to make a show on grief, much less sell it. But I’m Sorry for Your Loss is benefited by its thoughtful and thought-provoking scripts from playwright-turned-series creator Kit Steinkellner and nuanced, heartbreaking performances from Olsen, Janet McTeer as her mother, and Star Wars: The Last Jedi‘s Kelly Marie Tran as her sister. Plus, it’s perfectly timed at just 30 minutes per episode. Season 2 premiered October 1 on Facebook Watch.

Where to watch: Facebook Watch

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours (for the first season)


Big Mouth 99% (Netflix)

What it is: Co-created by Nick Kroll and featuring the voice talents of comedy heavy-hitters like John Mulaney, Fred Armisen, Maya Rudolph, and Jenny Slate, Big Mouth is a coming-of-age series about awkward teens discovering their sexuality through the raging hormones of puberty.

Why you should watch it: We’ve seen plenty of naughty comedies in the past, but none of them excavate the triumphs and traumas of pubescent adolescence quite as fearlessly or uproariously as Big Mouth. Season 3 premieres in full on October 4.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 10.5 hours (for the first two seasons, plus a Valentine’s Day special)


Peaky Blinders 92% (Netflix)

What it is: The going’s rough and tough in this BBC and Netflix co-production from creator Stephen Knight. Charting the rise of the notorious Peaky Blinders gang in post-WWI England, the long-running drama is led by a never-better Cillian Murphy as the fearless, cold-blooded leader, Tommy Shelby. 

Why you should watch it: Between its production design, its larger-than-life performances, and airtight writing and direction, this period series takes some big swings and lands each one. Murphy delivers as the icy Tommy, and Helen McCrory is stellar as the series’ hard-as-nails matriarch. Throw into the mix a strong, talent-heavy ensemble — including turns from the likes of Tom Hardy and Aidan Gillen — and Peaky Blinders earns its reputation as one of the best series that you just might be sleeping on. Season 5 premieres on October 4 on Netflix.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 24 hours (for the first four seasons)


Mr. Robot 94% (USA Network)

What it is: This decorated, mind-teaser of a series from creator Sam Esmail is at its core the story of Elliot, played by 2018 Oscar winner Rami Malek in a role that nabbed him an Emmy for best actor after season 1. Elliot is a mentally unstable (see: socially anxious, depressed, and drug-addicted) hacktivist recruited into “fsociety” by one Mr. Robot (Christian Slater). Confused? Intrigued? Just watch it.  

Why you should watch it: Over the course of three seasons, Mr. Robot has made it near-impossible to look away. Few other series today make for water-cooler fare at work, but Esmail — with the help of Malek, Slater, and an impressive supporting ensemble cast — taps into the cultural consciousness with a premise as timely as it is ambitious. Its fourth and final season premieres on October 6 on USA Network.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 24 hours (for the first three seasons)


Supergirl 88% (The CW)

What it is: Ever wonder what the other surviving Kryptonians (what few of them are left) are up to while Superman is out there saving the world? Well, turns out his cousin, Kara Zor-El (aka Supergirl) is up to just about the same thing. This is her story.

Why you should watch it: It took until the second season for this DC Comics series to really nail down its tone on the CW with star Melissa Benoist and co., but there’s no doubt that it today ranks as one of the most formidable hour-long outings in the superhero comics-to-screen universe. Season 5 premieres on October 6 on The CW.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 65 hours (for the first four seasons)


The Walking Dead 80% (AMC)

What it is: Don’t know what The Walking Dead is? You may want to check your pulse…

Why you should watch it: Based on the comic book series by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie Adlard’s post-apocalyptic premise of zombies walking the Earth and ending mankind as we know it, the acclaimed series developed by creator Frank Darabont indulges in gore and “what if” fascinations. These are characters brought to life with bone-deep precision from a stable of some of TV’s greatest talents. You just never know when your favorite will bite the dust, but that’s admittedly part of the fun, too. Tune into this season to catch Black Panther star Danai Gurira’s final outing. Season 10 premieres on October 6 on AMC.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 98 hours (for the first nine seasons)


All American 96% (The CW)

What it is: Inspired by the true story of former NFL-er Spencer Paysinger, this drama series from creator April Blair follows a talented high school football player from South L.A. who’s drafted to play for Beverly Hills — and the social and professional tensions that build when two worlds collide.

Why you should watch it: Hailed by the Hollywood Reporter the best new broadcast network drama of 2018, All American bears ingredients from some of our favorite teen and sports dramas of yesteryear while managing to stand out from the pack thanks to its central performances: newcomer Daniel Ezra as the recruited football star Spencer James and Taye Diggs as the NFL star-turned-Beverly Hills coach who sees a future in him. Season 2 premieres on October 7 on The CW.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 12 hours (for the first season)


The Flash 89% (The CW)

What it is: Grant Gustin is crime scene investigator–turned–crime scene vigilante Barry Allen (aka the Flash), a lightning-enhanced fastest man alive. The story follows Barry’s crime-fighting adventures alongside a group of friends with their own special abilities.

Why you should watch it: You don’t gain an adoring following like that of The Flash without bringing edge-of-your-seat comic-book action and suspense, lovable characters and story arcs, and pitch-perfect performances week to week. Equal parts charming and high-octane in all the right ways, this DC Comics offering keeps us coming back for more. Season 6 premieres on October 6 on The CW.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 82 hours (for the first five seasons)


Riverdale 84% (The CW)

What it is: Riverdale is the latest TV adaptation of the beloved Archie comics of yore — only this time, it gets the CW treatment as a murder mystery–thriller with hot, live-action high schoolers played by KJ Apa, Camila Mendes, Lili Reinhart, and Cole Sprouse. This is not your mom and dad’s Archie.

Why you should watch it: We’ll say it: Riverdale ranks among the best teen dramas to come out of primetime since Gossip Girl, and it deserves the viewership and brand ubiquity to match. It’s the classic Archie we know with a heaping serving of sex appeal and a dash of True Detective. What’s not to love? Season 4 premieres on October 9 on The CW. 

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 42 hours (for the first three seasons)


% (AMC)

What it is: Walter White is a high school chemistry professor who, after a terminal cancer diagnosis, begins cooking and selling methamphetamine to pay off his mounting medical bills and take care of his family. With that, what starts as a compelling enough premise in Vince Gilligan’s genre-defining character study builds to become one of the greatest series ever to grace the small screen.

Why you should watch it: As played by Bryan Cranston (who won a whopping five Emmys for the role), Walter White is one of the most iconic television characters of the 21st century. Meeting him mark for mark is Emmy winner Aaron Paul as his delinquent co-conspirator and cook, Jesse Pinkman. To watch the two of them play off each other while diving deeper into the underbelly of drugs and crime in New Mexico is about as good as TV gets. Binge all five groundbreaking seasons before its much-anticipated feature film bookend, El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie, premieres on October 11 on Netflix. 

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 46.5 hours (for all five seasons)


Castle Rock 88% (Hulu)

What it is: Set in the fictional, titular Maine town and drawn from the expansive works of Stephen King, this anthology series from creators Sam Shaw and Dustin Thomason uses characters both classic and new to re-imagine the author’s best works for the small screen. Season 1 was largely inspired by The Shawshank Redemption, while the second outing looks to pull from Misery.

Why you should watch it: With executive producers like King himself and blockbuster filmmaker J.J. Abrams at the helm, you know you’re in for some tricks along with your treats. And with Halloween right around the corner, the return of this hit horror series is sure to get you in the appropriate holiday spirit. Season 1 features standout performances from the likes of Andre Holland, Sissy Spacek, and Bill Skarsgård (himself a King-universe vet thanks to his Pennywise role in the record-breaking It films). Lizzy Caplan promises to light up the screen in season 2, which serves as something of a prequel or origin story for Misery’s demented nurse Annie Wilkes. Get a taste of the King-inspired mayhem before the new season’s October 23 premiere on Hulu. 

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 8.5 hours (for the first season)


The Kominsky Method 93% (Netflix)

What it is: Chuck Lorre knows TV, but we’ve never seen The Big Bang Theory and Two and a Half Men mastermind tackle something quite like The Kominsky Method, a half-hour, single-cam comedy that follows an aging acting coach and his agent in contemporary Hollywood. Both a stinging comedy on the industry’s lasting truths and a revealing, humorous look at men of a certain age, the series racked up two Golden Globes earlier this year, including Best Musical or Comedy Television Series.

Why you should watch it: Few things have been more satisfying over the last few years than watching Hollywood heavy-hitters deliver career-best work on the small screen. Among them are Oscar winners Michael Douglas and Alan Arkin as the central Sandy Kominsky and his longtime agent and friend Norman Newlander, respectively. The pair’s rat-a-tat everyman rapport goes down easy, even when they’re not on their best behavior. Season 2 premieres on October 25 on Netflix. 

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 4 hours (for the first season)


Silicon Valley 94% (HBO)

What it is: This acclaimed HBO comedy from creators John Altschuler, Mike Judge, and Dave Krinsky is the story of wunderkind coder Richard Hendricks (Thomas Middleditch) as he and partner Erlich Bachman (T.J. Miller) struggle to get their startup off the ground during Northern California’s tech boom.

Why you should watch it: Few shows pack as many laughs-per-episode as Silicon Valley. Through its hilarious portrayal of a company on the rise, it also taps into the real-world “brotopia” of the West Coast’s tech industry in more than just name with an assortment of memorable (and in the case of Middleditch, Emmy-nominated) performances across the board. Its sixth and final season premieres on October 27 on HBO.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, HBO Now, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 23 hours (for the first five seasons)


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Stranger Things SEASON Season 1 EPISODE 3 PHOTO CREDIT Courtesy of Netflix PICTURED Top 5000 Shannon Purser

(Photo by Courtesy of Netflix)

Netflix delivered a thrilling double-whammy this October with the premieres of The Haunting of Hill House and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, both of which serve up stellar moments of serialized horror. While the latter portrays the campy, occult end of the genre’s spectrum, the former paints a haunting portrait of grief with ghosts stalking the lives of one family over years. 

Those shows’ biggest scares us thinking about the best episodes of horror in TV history, so we’ve prepared a list of the scariest episodes of television ever. Among these fearsome moments are episodes of The Twilight Zone, Twin Peaks, The Walking Dead, and American Horror Story. But, in addition to those no-brainers, episodes of The X-Files, Stranger Things, Atlanta, and Doctor Who also strike terror into the hearts of viewers. 

So enter the crypt, lose yourself in the Zone, take a walk with the dead, then rank these scary episodes from most frightening to least below. And if you don’t see your favorite spooky TV tale on our list, tell us in the comments!


There’s a lot to binge up on going into this month — so let’s get right to it, shall we? Below, catch our roundup of 15 series boasting Certified Fresh seasons that are returning in October.


Will & Grace  (NBC)


What it is: Will (Eric McCormack) is a lawyer (and he’s gay); Grace (Debra Messing) is an interior designer (and she’s straight); they’re best friends who live in New York City, and they both have problems in life and love. Their zany sidekicks are Jack (Sean Hayes) and Karen (Megan Mullally), the latter of whom happens to be pals with one Donald Trump.

Why you should watch it: Few series can claim to have brought the situational comedy into the modern age, but with its fresh, incisive, and most of all hilarious take on contemporary life in New York city — while featuring a pair of gay men and their best girlfriends to match — Will & Grace is one of the series that did. The best episodes of last season prove a) why NBC revived this hit series and b) why it’s still essential viewing all these years later. Season 10 premieres Oct. 4.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 77 hours


Big Mouth 99% (Netflix)


What it is: Co-created by Nick Kroll and featuring the voice talents of comedy heavy-hitters like John Mulaney, Fred Armisen, Maya Rudolph, and Jenny Slate, Big Mouth is a coming-of-age series about awkward teens discovering their sexuality and more through the raging hormones of puberty.

Why you should watch it: We’ve seen plenty of naughty comedies in the past, but none of them excavate the triumphs and traumas of pubescent adolescence quite as fearlessly or uproariously as Big Mouth. Season 2 premieres in full October 5.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours


The Man in the High Castle 84% (Amazon)


What it is: Talk about a premise: The Man in the High Castle is created by Frank Spotnitz (The X-Files) and depicts a dystopian United States that imagines a world where the very worst has happened: Nazi Germany won the Second World War and currently reigns supreme.

Why you should watch it: Fresh off Amazon’s Emmys-sweep with The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, now’s as good a time as ever to go back and discover some other standouts in the streaming service’s catalog. First thing we’d suggest is The Man in the High Castle. Epic and engrossing — not to mention timely — it takes viewers into an utterly foreign world that still hits a little too close to today’s political climate for comfort (the way that so many of TV’s very finest manage to do). Season 3 premieres October 5.

Where to watch: Amazon

Commitment: Approx. 20 hours


Fresh Off the Boat 94% (ABC)


What it is: Set in the 1990s and loosely adapted from celebrity chef Eddie Huang’s memoir of the same name, Fresh Off the Boat follows a first-generation Taiwanese family who picks up from their Chinatown home in Washington, D.C., and heads south to Orlando, Florida, where father Louis Huang (Randall Park) opens a country-western steakhouse.

Why you should watch it: A refreshing take on Asian Americans for the small screen? Check. Well-earned laughs from a trio of talented young actors? Check. A heaping dose of ’90s nostalgia? Check. And the combined powers of the hilarious Park and Constance Wu (now of Crazy Rich Asians fame)? Check and check. Need we say more? Season 5 premieres October 5.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 22 hours


Doctor Who 92% (BBC America)


What it is: Considering Doctor Who is about nothing less than fantastical adventures through the space-time continuum, it’s difficult to sum up in a sentence or two. But just know that it follows an alien Time Lord who’s known as the Doctor (who’s been inhabited by a number of actors and now actresses over the years) and his companions — this season called her “friends.”

Why you should watch it: Doctor Who is making a case for being one of those timeless sci-fi properties that’s earned a devout following akin to Star Wars or Star Trek. The decades-spanning series always finds ways to one-up itself, and with Jodie Whittaker appearing as the first female Doctor this season, there’s never been a better time to jump aboard. Season 11 premieres October 7 — to get ready, we recommend you begin with the 2005 relaunch.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, MicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 90 hours


The Walking Dead 80% (AMC)


What it is: You don’t know what The Walking Dead is? You may want to check your pulse…

Why you should watch it: One of cable’s highest rated dramas returns with its season 9 premiere on October 7. Based on the comic book series by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie Adlard’s post-apocalyptic premise of zombies walking the Earth and ending mankind as we know it, the acclaimed series developed by creator Frank Darabont indulges in gore and “what if” fascinations. These are characters brought to life with bone-deep precision from a stable of some of TV’s greatest talents. You just never know when your favorite will bite the dust. (That’s admittedly part of the fun, too.)

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 86 hours


Black Lightning 92% (The CW)


What it is: While he thought he had hung up his super suit and street-fighting days of yesteryear for good, Jefferson Pierce (now a school principal) comes out of “retirement” as Black Lightning as street gangs threaten his city.

Why you should watch it: If you’re a fan of the Greg Berlanti–led DC Comics universe on The CW, then you know what you’re in for here, and you’ll love Black Lightning. But this series goes one step further by being an awesome first of its kind, spotlighting not only black superheroes on the small screen, but LGBTQ ones, as well. Season 2 premieres on October 8.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 9.5 hours


The Flash 89% (The CW)


What it is: Grant Gustin is crime scene investigator–turned–crime scene vigilante Barry Allen (a.k.a. the Flash), a lightning-enhanced fastest man alive. The story follows Barry’s crime-fighting adventures with a group of friends with their own special abilities.

Why you should watch it: You don’t gain an adoring following like that of The Flash without bringing edge-of-your-seat action and suspense, lovable characters and story arcs, and pitch-perfect performances week to week. Season 5 premieres October 8.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 66 hours


Riverdale 84% (The CW)


What it is: Riverdale is the latest TV adaptation of the beloved Archie comics of yore — only this time, it gets the CW treatment as a murder mystery–thriller with live-action, and hot high schoolers played by KJ Apa, Camila Mendes, Lili Reinhart, and Cole Sprouse.

Why you should watch it: We’ll say it: Riverdale ranks among the best teen dramas to come out of The CW since Gossip Girl, and it deserves the viewership and brand ubiquity to match. It’s the classic Archie we know with a heaping of sex appeal and a dash of True Detective. What’s not to love? Season 3 premieres October 10.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 25.5 hours


Crazy Ex-Girlfriend 98% (The CW)


What it is: Musical comedy series Crazy Ex-Girlfriend begins with our hero lawyer Rebecca Bunch quitting her job and moving across the country to live near her childhood boyfriend, Josh — whom she hasn’t spoken to in years. To say the least, it’s all uphill from there.

Why you should watch it: Whatever you do, don’t be put off by the series’ title — even if you’ve got one! Starring as Rebecca, Rachel Bloom is a musical genius, concocting show-stopping comedic melodies inspired by the best of Broadway and Top 40 week after week. And as if the comedy’s song-and-dance wasn’t entertaining enough, it’s buoyed by excellent performances and tight, creative scripts that tackle everything from broken hearts to mental health. Last season got especially dark, and we love it all the more for continuing to break the mold. Season 4 premieres October 12.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 30 hours


Supergirl 88% (The CW)


What it is: Ever wonder what the other surviving Kryptonians (what few of them are left) are up to while Superman is out there saving the world? Well, turns out his cousin, Kara Zor-El (a.k.a. Supergirl) is up to just about the same thing. This is her story.

Why you should watch it: It took until the second season for this DC Comics series to really nail down its tone with star Melissa Benoist and crew, but there’s no doubt that it now ranks as one of the most formidable hour-long outings in the superheroic comics-to-screen universe. Plus some behind-the-scenes trivia: Benoist is fresh off a Broadway run as Carole King in Beautiful: The Carole King Musical. We love a multi-talented Supergirl! Season 4 premieres October 14.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 45 hours


Arrow 86% (The CW)


What it is: How would your life change if you were stranded on an island for five years? It’s unlikely you’d turn into a caped crusader dead set on protecting his city with a bow and arrow, but to viewers’ delight, that’s exactly the case with billionaire Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell). Now he’s known as the Green Arrow.

Why you should watch it: Arrow is the series that first kickstarted the DC Comics universe for Berlanti and The CW, and for six seasons now, it hasn’t let up the fun. Season 7 premieres October 15.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 102 hours


black-ish 92% (ABC)


What it is: Funnyman Anthony Anderson stars as Dre Johnson, a black, upper-middle-class family man who — in a predominantly white neighborhood, school, and culture — still wants his kids to retain a sense of black identity.

Why you should watch it: Creator Kenya Barris is one of those writers who just goes there. Even in what some would call the confines of network TV — which, incidentally, has been seen pushing up against him this last year — he conjures stories in the sitcom structure that are resonant, timely, and fearless. Plus, they’ll make you laugh, too! Tracy Ellis Ross and Anderson are especially show-stealing. Season 5 premieres October 16.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 35 hours


% (Netflix)


What it is: Matt Murdock (Charlie Cox) is a blind lawyer who fights organized crime in New York City. He wears a suit during the day in the courthouse, but dons a mask when the fight continues at night and he becomes his vigilante alter ego, Daredevil.

Why you should watch it: As the first Marvel original series venture on Netflix, Daredevil had a lot buzz and high expectations to live up to. We’re glad to report that it did and then some. Certainly among the best-executed comic adaptations for TV to date, it’s gritty, character-driven, and entertaining. Watch the first two seasons followed by The Defenders season 1 before diving into Daredevil season 3, which premieres Oct. 19.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 34 hours


Ray Donovan 72% (Showtime)


What it is: Ray Donovan ranks as one of the finer character studies in recent memory, with Liev Schreiber playing the titular Los Angeles–area “fixer” with smoldering grit and Jon Voight as his no-good ex-con father. Ray may be the man L.A.’s rich and famous call to get out of trouble, but upon the return of his father, Donovan, a family man himself, develops problems of his own.

Why you should watch it: When Ray Donovan premiered on Showtime in 2013, it promised the arrival of an exciting new anti-hero. It’s since stayed true to that promise and hasn’t let up, bringing us into the hidden underbelly of Los Angelean elite and slowly unveiling the many layers of a complicated and troubled man. Season 6 premieres October 28.

Where to watch: AmazonFandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 52 hours

“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” stars Henry Simmons as Agent Alphonso “Mack” MacKenzie. (ABC/Kurt Iswarienkio ); MARVEL'S CLOAK & DAGGER - "Suicide Sprints" - EMMA LAHANA (Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani); Marvel's Luke Cage star Alfre Woodard (Cara Howe/Netflix); Black Lightning - China Anne McClain as Jennifer Pierce (Richard Ducree/The CW); Riverdale -- Casey Cott as Kevin (Katie Yu/The CW

(Photo by ABC/Kurt Iswarienkio; Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani; Cara Howe/Netflix; Richard Ducree/The CW; Katie Yu/The CW)

Sometimes the major heroes of television shows based on comic books just need some support. It can be in the form of a best friend, a worthy opponent, a character to carry a secondary plot or someone just to be there and literally tell the main character that they’re doing a great job. Characters can start out as the latter and emerge as fan favorites. They can also remain on the periphery of the frame, offering commentary or a key piece of info. And then there are also a few who are just criminally underutilized.

So let’s celebrate the characters who help make the heroes look good, be they guests, recurring parts, or reliable presences. Here are a few of the best supporting characters in 2018.


M’yrnn J’onnz (Carl Lumbly) | Supergirl 88%

In some ways, it is a cheat to bring the superlative Carl Lumbly onto Supergirl as J’onn J’onzz’s (David Harewood) father M’yrrn. But as Lumbly defined the role of the Martian Manhunter on television – he voiced J’onn in the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated series – it was also fitting to bring that persona of dignity and gravitas to the part.

In doing so, it opened up M’yrnn to a wealth of new experiences and some of the best moments in Supergirl’s third season. His delight in discovering coffee, his karaoke night with the gang, and J’onn’s attempt to give them more of a family life by moving them both out of the DEO and into an apartment all revealed added and welcome dimensions for both characters. Sadly, Lumbly and M’yrnn were not to be permanent additions, as the writing team saw fit to almost immediately give the character a degenerative brain disease. But even as that story line continued to its inevitable conclusion, both performer and character embraced their scripted fate with dignity and a performance far beyond the material as written.


Herr Klaus Starr (Pip Torrens) | Preacher 87%

As opposed to his comic-book counterpart, it is easy to imagine the Herr Starr of AMC’s Preacher would like a quiet retirement. Despite being the most efficient and ruthless agent of The Grail, the strain it puts on him is easy to see even as he carries out its directives. It is also the underlying reason why he’d rather see Jesse (Dominic Cooper) become the Messiah over The Grail’s inbred scion Humperdoo (Tyson Ritter). Granted, any sane person would make that choice as well, even in the insane world of the show.

But for all his motivations and skills, the guy can’t catch a break and finds himself forever at Jesse’s heels, even when he should have the upperhand. That said, it seems he finally has a way to hold sway over Jesse thanks to a deal with Gran’ma Marie (Betty Buckley) and the ever-present carrot of Jesse’s Genesis-infused soul. Will he finally get everything he wants exactly how he wants it?

Well, if the show follows even just 10 percent of Starr’s story from the comics, it seems unlikely. Nonetheless, it makes Starr the best of the supporting foils on Preacher.


Sheriff Randy Nedly (Greg Lawson) | Wynonna Earp 92%

As the top lawman in Purgatory, Sheriff Nedly would like nothing more than to see the town resume its sleepy ways. But that’s really a front, as he has always known Purgatory and the surrounding Ghost River Triangle is a magnet for supernatural happenings. He does his best to keep the strange incidents Wynonna (Melanie Scrofano) and her friends get into from becoming public knowledge. And while initially standoffish with Black Badge Division agent Xavier Dolls (Shamier Anderson), he ultimately embraced his presence as another line of defense against the demonic forces in the region. He also proved to be an able mentor to Officer Nicole Haught (Katherine Barrell), a woman who, like Nedly, seems destined to tangle with the unexplained.

And yet, Nedly faces those horrors with a quip and that gruff, irritable manner we saw in the first season — even if he has become something of a teddy bear to the main cast. He faced down the widows of Sheriff Clootie by asking if they were Pokemon and had, perhaps, the best reaction to being glamored by vampires by dropping his irascible facade entirely and embracing an ascot. Nedly may not be a constant presence on the show, but he is definitely welcome whenever he appears.


Malcolm Ducasse (Eka Darville) | %

Marvel's Jessica Jones, Season 2, EPISODE 1, PHOTO CREDIT David Giesbrecht/Netflix, PICTURED Eka Darville

(Photo by David Giesbrecht/Netflix)

Malcolm has come so far since his days as Killgrave’s (David Tennant) victim and Jessica’s (Krysten Ritter) junkie neighbor; in fact, this may even be the last time he will still be considered a “supporting character.”

While The Defenders and the early parts of Jessica Jones’ second season saw him dutifully fulfilling his self-appointed role as her sidekick, we soon saw Malcolm’s own innate detective skills and sense of justice leading him away from Jessica. In his spare time, he replaced his drug habit with a long string of hook-ups, leading to a one-night stand with Trish (Rachael Taylor) that both seemed to regret in the end.

And though moving away from Jessica as a truly supporting player, his emerging B-Plot highlighted one of Jessica’s big faults – her inability to embrace people – while defining him as one of the best characters in the second season. Sadly, his success meant he had to leave Alias Investigations entirely for a rival P.I. firm and stealing away Jessica’s best client, Jeri Hogarth (Carrie Anne Moss). Hopefully, it will work out for Malcolm and, just maybe, he and Jessica will mend things before too long.

 


Zari Tomaz (Tala Ashe) | DC's Legends of Tomorrow 89%

DC's Legends of Tomorrow -- "Guest Starring John Noble" Pictured: Tala Ashe as Zari -- Photo: Dean Buscher/The CW

(Photo by )

When Ashe was first announced as a new permanent member of the Legends team, the character was said to be something of a foil for the established characters. But when she finally debuted, she quickly went from criticizing the ne’er-do-wells’ habit of making situations worse to munching on kettle corn while watching them do it. But considering she came from a 2042 in which A.R.G.U.S. turned the United States into an anti-metahuman police state in which food was scarce, it makes absolute sense she would abuse the Waverider’s food replicator and collection of video games.

Though haunted by the death of her brother in 2041 and stand-offish with the team for the first few months, Zari finally embraced them as friends after spending an incalculable amount of time inside a time-loop which reset with the Waverider exploding. While still sarcastic and occasionally emotionally distant, Zari accepted the ship as home, aiding the team in fashioning a Beebo doll powerful enough to stop the demon Mallus.

And even though the treat to her life from Mallus was over, she choose to remain with the Legends. We’re definitely glad she did.


Detective Brigid O’Reilly (Emma Lahana) | Cloak and Dagger 87%

MARVEL'S CLOAK & DAGGER - "Suicide Sprints" - EMMA LAHANA (Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani)

(Photo by Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani)

Making her presence felt in the second episode of Cloak & Dagger as an almost completely silent detective, O’Reilly quickly distinguished herself as an upstanding officer of the law. With a keen eye for detection — she knew almost instantly that Tandy Bowen’s (Olivia Holt) first stabbing was in self-defense — and a true sense of justice — she chaffed after being told she could not pursue Tandy’s case any further — she quickly became Tandy and Tyrone Johnson’s (Aubrey Joseph) only real support; in fact, she was more supportive of the two than they were of each other.

When neither the light-wielding Tandy nor the darkness-controlling Tyrone could turn to their parents, she became the go-to adult. But as viewers saw, her willingness to bend some laws for a greater good or even do a line of coke for pleasure and business suggests she is more than just a good cop, making her a rough balance of the Johnsons’ tendency toward precise order and Melissa Bowen’s (Andrea Roth) love affair with chaos. Created by Bill Mantlo in the first issue of Cloak & Dagger in 1985, O’Reilly was always a supporting character for the duo. Including after she died and became something else – a change in status seemingly teased in the closing moments of the show’s first season.


Morgan Jones (Lenny James) | The Walking Dead 80% and Fear the Walking Dead 75%

For some, The Walking Dead never quite worked because Morgan was missing for so long. Debuting in the first episode as a distraught man readying himself to shoot his zombified wife’s corpse, James made a staggering impression in what was his only appearance until a single episode in season 3. The character remained alive in the story via a walky-talky and Rick’s (Andrew Lincoln) constant attempts to give him some clue of where his group was headed.

But when the pair finally reunited in season 5, Morgan was a changed man. His journey to Alexandria was not an easy one, and it saw his strength collapse into profound grief over the loss of his family and a willingness to kill anyone who got in his way. Eventually, he met a man who helped him recover some of his humanity. After which, he choose to find Rick.

Despite learning a way of peace, events since joining Rick’s group have led him back to violence. Still suffering from PTSD, the control Morgan thought he had wavered in the face of the world Rick and other groups were building. Consequently, he began to kill again and later suffered hallucinations of some of his victims. When last seen, Morgan appeared ready to leave the group and heal.

Now, on Fear the Walking Dead, Morgan is maintaining his wish to be alone while healing, even if he’s coming to understand that isolation is just not practical. To those he encounters, he’s something of a soothsayer, but it may just be a matter of time before Morgan resumes the way of violence.


Kevin Keller (Casey Cott) | Riverdale 84%

Riverdale -- "Chapter Twenty-Seven: The Hills Have Eyes" -- Image Number: RVD214a_0028.jpg -- Pictured: Casey Cott as Kevin -- Photo: Dean Buscher/The CW

(Photo by Dean Buscher/The CW)

If there is one character on Riverdale who genuinely remains in the support category, it’s Kevin Keller. While presented as important part of the gang – he is Betty’s (Lili Reinhart) confidant – he is not one of the main four and often finds himself either aiding Betty or offering quippy commentary on the events of the week while passing through the halls of Riverdale High. Early in the second season, the Black Hood story line dovetailed with Kevin’s penchant for cruising, but it was dropped before anything truly meaningful could come of it, and that’s despite Kevin’s decision to come out to his father.

Nonetheless, Kevin is always around to back up the gang or literally set the stage with his production of Carrie: The Musical. And his continued presence as a supporting player may be rewarded in the third season as he and Josie (Ashleigh Murray) – another underutilized character – find themselves living under one roof when their parents decide they should become a family. Hopefully, it will lead to more of a presence for Kevin (and Josie) going forward.


Alphonso “Mack” Mackenzie (Henry Simmons) |  %

After all these years, it is difficult to remember a time when Mack was an agent of a rival version of S.H.I.E.L.D., looking to steal Nick Fury’s Toolbox from Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg). But as the show looked back on itself during season 5, Mack’s original status on the show underscores where he is now – the resident healthy skeptic. Even after traveling through time, experiencing another life in a computer and becoming possessed by the Spirit of Vengeance, Mack is always the first to call shenanigans on any new ridiculous threat or tech the team encounters.

But even as a plant, Mack endeared himself quickly by becoming Fitz’s (Iain De Caestecker) interpreter while he recovered from brain trauma and an indispensable part of Coulson’s core team when the two S.H.I.E.L.D.s merged late in the second season. Not that it’s been easy for him. He’s tried to quit multiple times and always ends up with more responsibilities as a consequence. He also carries the memory of a child he lost in real life and in that computer simulation, and his relationship with Yo-Yo (Natalia Cordova-Buckley) has hit one of its roughest patches going into the sixth season. Through it all, Mack perseveres, though. Sometimes thanks to his faith — he’s also the only truly religious member of the team — and sometimes because he’s the guy holding the shotgun-axe.


Jennifer Pierce (China Anne McClain) | Black Lightning 92%

Though Black Lightning is still a young series – its first season ran 13 episodes – it worked hard to get to places some of its CW brethren would reach far later in their runs. Consequently, the show opens with a team practically assembled already – the Pierce family; in fact, a threat to the family forces Jefferson (Cress Williams) into taking up his Black Lightning identity again.

But in the subsequent weeks, younger daughter Jennifer distinguished herself as a character to watch. While headstrong, she is not necessarily bratty. And in those times when her antics are the legitimate actions of a brat, she always finds a way to square things with Jefferson, her mother Lynn (Christine Adams) or older sister Anissa (Nafessa Williams). Despite being the odd one out in the family, the bond she felt for them was strong and always workable. And that’s before the onset of her powers.

Once her abilities emerged, and her family learned about them, Jennifer became one of the most intriguing characters on the show because she did not want them. Finally revealing that she wants “a normal life,” she took a key step toward maturity and defining who she will be even as it seems she has embraced her powers.


Mariah Dillard (Alfre Woodard) | Marvel’s Luke Cage

While much of the talk about Luke Cage’s second season centered on new villain John McIver — aka Bushmaster (Mustafa Shakir) — the show-stealing Mariah Dillard elevated the program in unexpected ways; for one, Bushmaster’s real conflict was with the former councilwoman and criminal mastermind. Luke (Mike Colter) just kept pushing his way into the crossfire. The character’s attempts to go legitimate underscored the legacy of her grandmother and the ugly truth about her daughter Tilda Johnson (Gabrielle Dennis), revealing the real theme of the season while also giving Mariah a layered relationship with Shades (Theo Rossi). As Bushmaster unraveled Mariah’s schemes and pushed her closer and closer to the Stokes legacy, so too did Mariah’s ability to maintain her composure and lie convincingly to those closest to her.

Add a legitimately award-worthy performance by Woodard and you get a stunningly complex look at a woman on the brink of getting everything she wanted, but failing to get it or the peace she was really looking to find. Even in her final acts, she chose to be vindictive instead of resolving her remaining grief with Luke or Tilda.

Titans - Robin (DC Universe)

(Photo by DC Universe)

The Comic-Con International: San Diego programming schedule is a mammoth list of competing ideas and events for fans of movies, television, animation, games, cosplay, and, yes, comic books. It is also an exciting look at the sort of experiences con-goers will find themselves lining up for next week. For those at home, it also offers a glimpse at some of the videos they might be watching on Twitter and YouTube soon after. And as the convention becomes more and more focused on television – and TV based on comic books – learning about all of those events could be a troublesome task. But we’ve sifted through the schedule to give you this round-up of the panels, presentations, and Q&As about your favorite comic book shows taking place across the week.


Thursday, July 19

Marvel Animation: Marvel Rising

Marvel Rising comic book (Marvel)

(Photo by Marvel)

Click to view full image.

The upcoming series of animated shorts brings together Quake (voiced by Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.’s Chloe Bennet), Squirrel Girl (Milana Vayntrub), Ms. Marvel (Kathreen Khavari), and Patriot (Kamil McFadden) to form a new supergroup for a new generation. The session will feature the voice cast and Marvel’s Cort Lane, Marsha Griffin, and Sana Amanat as they offer a sneak peek at the series and, quite possibly, make a special announcement.

Time & Location: 3:15 p.m. in Room 6DE

For Those At Home: If the sneak peek includes one of the first Marvel Rising shorts, it may end up online shortly after the panel.


Netflix: Marvel’s Iron Fist

Iron Fist season 1 keyart (Netflix)

(Photo by Netflix)

Jeph Loeb, head of Marvel’s TV division, and “surprise guests” will offer the first inside look at the second season of Iron Fist. Considering the thoroughly rebooted Danny Rand (Finn Jones) seen in the second season of Luke Cage, it will be interesting to see if the new year – and new showrunner Raven Metzner – will follow through on that promise as both he and Colleen Wing (Jessica Henwick) take to defending downtown.

Time & Location: 6 p.m. in Ballroom 20

For Those At Home: A trailer almost seems like a given, as well as a release date announcement.


Friday

Fear the Walking Dead/The Walking Dead Panels

The Walking Dead season 9 SDCC panel poster (AMC)

(Photo by AMC)

Click to view full image.

It is now a Comic-Con tradition for the two shows to do back-to-back panels and 2018 will be no exception. During Fear’s hour, members of the cast like Alycia Debnam-Carey, Colman Domingo, Lennie James, and Danay Garcia – alongside FX wizard Greg Nicotero, showrunners Andrew Chambliss, and Ian Goldberg and executive producers Scott M. Gimple, Robert Kirkman, Gale Anne Hurd, and Dave Alpert – will discuss the road so far and what to expect when the show returns in August. In the second hour, Walking Dead showrunner Angela Kang and stars Andrew Lincoln, Norman Reedus, Danai Gurira, Melissa McBride, and Jeffrey Dean Morgan will offer their insights into the upcoming ninth season of the long-running zombie series. Both sessions will include fan Q&As in which cast and crew will deftly avoid spoilers.

Time & Location: 11:15 a.m. in Hall H

For Those At Home: Another Walking Dead tradition is the intense season previews, which generally appear on AMC’s YouTube page before the panel ends.


DC Superhero Girls Video Presentation

DC Super Hero Girls logo (Warner Bros. Animation)

(Photo by Warner Bros. Animation)

My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic’s Lauren Faust brings the DC Super Hero Girls brand to Cartoon Network in a new animated series focused on teenage versions of Wonder Woman, Supergirl, and Batgirl. Faust and other members of the creative team will offer a first look at the new show.

Time & Location: 12:20 p.m. in Room 6DE

For Those At Home: It would be quite surprising if a clip from the show did not surface after the presentation.


Wynonna Earp Premiere Screening

WYNONNA EARP -- Season:2 -- Pictured: Melanie Scrofano as Wynonna Earp -- (Photo by: Michelle Faye/Wynonna Earp Season 2, Inc./Syfy)

(Photo by Michelle Faye/Wynonna Earp Season 2, Inc./Syfy)

As the series’ third season debuts on the same day, the stars of Wynonna Earp, showrunner Emily Andras and creator Beau Smith will present a special screening of the premiere, “Blood Red and Going Down.”

Time & Location: 5 p.m. at the Horton Grand Theater

For Those At Home: Sadly, this one sounds like a genuine Comic-Con exclusive. But as the episode airs the same night – and, in fact, also airs during a special preview on Monday, July 16 – Earpers will be in the know and ready to discuss the episode on Twitter.


Marvel Televsion: Cloak & Dagger

Marvel's Cloak and Dagger stars Aubrey Joseph and Olivia Holt (Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani)

(Photo by Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani)

Stars Olivia Holt, Aubrey Joseph, Emma Lahana, Ally Maki, and showrunner Joe Pokaski will present “never-before-seen footage” and take audience questions. Since it is the show’s first convention panel following its debut in June, you can bet fans of the show will be ready to ask about the changes to the traditional Cloak & Dagger.

Time & Location: 5:45 p.m. in Ballroom 20

For Those At Home: That never-before-seen footage may make its way to Freeform’s YouTube channel, but it will be surprising if it is anything different from the episode preview seen during the show’s regular timeslot.


AMC’s Preacher Panel

Joseph Gilgun as Cassidy, Ruth Negga as Tulip O'Hare, Dominic Cooper as Jesse Custer - Preacher _ Season 3, Gallery - Photo Credit: Frank Ockenfels 3/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

(Photo by Frank Ockenfels 3/AMC/Sony Pictures Television)

Stars Dominic Cooper, Ruth Negga, and Joseph Gilgun join executive producers Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg, and showrunner Sam Catlin for a talk about the current state of play going into season 3’s halfway point. Expect to hear about the Tombs, the Allfather, and maybe even some of God’s plan for Jesse. Or maybe the cast will talk about what they had for dinner.

Time & Location: 7:30 p.m. in Hall H

For Those At Home: Since the season will be at the midway point, you might expect some sort of extended trailer for the latter half. Or an extended “next week on Preacher” promo.


Saturday

Black Lightning Special Video Presentation and Q&A

Cress Williams as Black Lightning (The CW)

(Photo by The CW)

The series makes its Comic-Con return for an “electrifying look” at the upcoming second season. Stars like Cress Williams, China Anne McClain, Nafessa Williams, and Christine Adams are scheduled to appear alongside showrunner Salim Akil.

Time & Location: 11 a.m. in Ballroom 20

For Those At Home: As these panels often occur before production resumes on the show, it is possible the video presentation will not be available online later. But if they have begun shooting, you may find a season 2 sizzle reel online before too long. Meanwhile, more than few people are hoping an Arrowverse crossover announcement will emerge from the Q&A.


SYFY’s Krypton Panel

KRYPTON -- "The Phantom Zone" Episode 110 -- Pictured: (l-r) Wallis Day as Nyssa-Vex, Cameron Cuffe as Seg-El, Ian McElhinney as Val-El -- (Photo by: Steffan Hill/Syfy)

(Photo by Steffan Hill/Syfy)

Cast members Cameron Cuffe, Ann Ogbomo, Wallis Day, and Shaun Sipos alongside showrunner Cameron Welsh and DC Entertainment’s Dan Evans will take a look back at the surprising first season and tease what is to come in the program’s second year.

Time & Location: 12 p.m. in the Indigo Ballroom at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel

For Those At Home: Like Black Lightning, the chances of a trailer depend entirely on whether or not they resumed production in time. But there is a good chance a season 2 casting announcement may be made.


Big Hero 6: The Series: Heroes Return

The cast and crew of the new Big Hero 6 television series will discuss bringing the movie’s characters to television and offer some never-before-seen clips from the series. With Scott Adsit reprising his role as Baymax, you can expect a lot of his responses to have a certain gentle, robotic tone to them.

Time & Location: 12:30 p.m. in Room 6A.

For Those At Home: That never-before-seen footage might be available online at some point.


The Gifted Panel and First Look Video

THE GIFTED: L-R: Sean Teale, Jamie Chung, Blair Redford, Emma Dumont, Percy Hynes White, Amy Acker, Stephen Moyer, Natalie Alyn Lind and Coby Bell in THE GIFTED premiering premiering Monday, Oct. 2 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2017 Fox Broadcasting Co. Cr: Miller Mobley/FOX

(Photo by Miller Mobley/FOX)

Executive producers Matt Nix and Jeph Loeb, and stars Stephen Moyer, Sean Teale, Jamie Chung, Emma Dumont, Blair Redford, Natalie Alyn Lind, and Skyler Samuels intend to offer an extended first look at the upcoming second season and, most likely, answer fan questions about certain characters’ choices in the season 1 finale.

Time & Location: 2:30 p.m. in Ballroom 20

For Those At Home: You can be sure that first-look video will be uploaded to YouTube before too long.


Supergirl/Arrow/DC’s Legends of Tomorrow/The Flash Special Video Presentations and Q&As

Melissa Benoist as Kara/Supergirl and Grant Gustin as Barry/The Flash (Robert Voets/Warner Bros)

(Photo by Robert Voets/Warner Bros)

Another Comic-Con tradition is the Arrowverse’s absolute takeover of Ballroom 20 on Saturday afternoon. All four shows offer fans ample opportunities for questions and special sneak peeks of their upcoming seasons. Cast and producers will be on hand to tease future events and maybe even reveal more information on Batwoman, who will make her Arrowverse debut in this year’s crossover event.

Time & Location: 3:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. in Ballroom 20

For Those At Home: The CW is pretty good at getting their sizzle reels onto its YouTube page fairly quickly, but it remains to be seen how much new footage each show will have to share.


Deadly Class Sneak Peek

The upcoming SYFY series based on the comic book by Remender and Wes Craig will make its Comic-Con debut. Both will be on hand with castmembers like Benjamin Wadsworth and Benedict Wong and showrunners Miles Orion Feldsott and Mick Betancourt to offer a sneak peek of the series, due out in 2019.

Time & Location: 6 p.m. in the Indigo Ballroom at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel

For Those At Home: Unless the sneak peek ends up being the full pilot episode, expect to see the video sooner rather than later.


Wynonna Earp Panel

Wynonna Earp (Syfy)

(Photo by Syfy)

Stars Melanie Scrofano, Shamier Anderson, Tim Rozon, Dominique Provost-Chalkley, Katherine Barrell, Varun Saranga, Chantel Riley, showrunner Emily Andras, and comic book creator Beau Smith return to Comic-Con for the third lovefest dedicated to everyone’s favorite Revenant hunter. While there is the promise of exclusive material, the panel usually becomes an opportunity for fans to offer their heartfelt praise to the cast and crew.

Time & Location: 6:45 p.m. in Room 6DE.

For Those At Home: Traditionally, the cast and crew have announced the show’s renewal at the Comic-Con panel. Fans are hoping it will be three-for-three and what better news can you give the Earpers at home?


Sunday

Riverdale Special Video Presentation and Q&A

Riverdale cast (Art Streiber/The CW)

Riverdale takes over Hall H for the first time as cast and crew convene to discuss the implications of Archie’s (KJ Apa) arrest at the end of the second season. The hour also promises to include a special video presentation and a fan Q&A in which some fans will attempt to learn star Cole Sprouse’s relationship status.

Time & Location: 11:45 a.m. in Hall H

For Those At Home: Should that video presentation offer a very early look at season 2, that footage will be repurposed and uploaded for all to see in the fullness of time.


Marvel Animation Presents

Time & Location: 1:30 p.m. in Room 6A

Marvel Senior Vice President for Animation and Family Entertainment Cort Lane will offer a preview of the upcoming seasons of Marvel’s Avengers: Black Panther’s Quest and Marvel’s Spider-Man. Sneak peeks and surprises are also promised.

For Those At Home: Marvel tends to be pretty good about getting clips and trailers up quickly.


Legion Discussion and Q&A

LEGION -- "Chapter 18" - Season 2, Episode 10 (Airs Tuesday, June 5, 10:00 pm/ep) -- Pictured: Dan Stevens as David Haller. CR: Suzanne Tenner/FX

(Photo by Suzanne Tenner/FX)

Series creator Noah Hawley, executive producers John Cameron, Marvel Televison’s Jeph Loeb, and members of the cast will discuss season 2’s shocking revelations and tease things to come in season 3.

Time & Location: 2:15 p.m. in Hall H

For Those At Home: Considering Legion is in between production blocks, it seems unlikely any new footage will be available during the event or afterward.


DC Universe Experience

And outside the convention center, DC Universe will offer a larger-than-life installation to fans centered on the shows and other content the upcoming streaming service will offer later this fall. Guests of the DC Universe Experience will visit Dick Grayson’s loft from Titans, peruse the lab of Doom Patrol’s Dr. Niles Caulder, avoid the deadly virus of Swamp Thing, create some chaos with Harley Quinn, and examine some rare DC Comics artwork and memorabilia not usually available to the public. The experience will be open throughout the convention from 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. (9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, July 22). Fans attending the con can pre-register at dcuniverse.com.

Location: Hilton San Diego Gaslamp Quarter, 401 K Street, San Diego, CA 92101

For Those At Home: This one is a genuine Comic-Con exclusive.


Be sure to check out Rotten Tomatoes’ own live event during Comic-Con, Your Opinion Sucks! It’s the ultimate fans vs. critics face off, and you can watch it live in San Diego or on video at Rotten Tomatoes.

Halloween is nigh upon us, and ’tis the season for ghoulish celebrations. With that in mind, we’ve compiled a handy list of well-reviewed movies and TV shows you can stream on Netflix right now, in case you want to get a head start on the spooky festivities. Whether you’re looking for a classic slasher flick, a pyschological thriller, a horror comedy, or even something you can watch with the kids, we’ve got you covered. See below for all of the selections.


1. ABCs of Death 2 (2014) 73%

(Photo by Magnet Releasing)

This follow-up to the 2013 omnibus film features 26 horror segments — one for each letter of the alphabet — helmed by 26 different directors.

Stream Now

2. American Horror Story 77%

(Photo by Prashant Gupta/FX)

Ryan Murphy’s horror anthology series boasts spooky environs, provocative themes, and top-notch acting from Jessica Lange, Dylan McDermott, Sarah Paulson, Evan Peters, Zachary Quinto, and Frances Conroy. Seasons 1-6 are available to stream.

Stream Now

3. The Babadook (2014) 98%

(Photo by IFC Midnight)

Writer-director Jennifer Kent’s Golden Tomato Award-winning horror film tells the deeply unnerving story a widow and her six-year-old who are bedeviled by a storybook monster.

Stream Now

4. Baskin (2015) 80%

(Photo by IFC Midnight)

This Turkish horror film tells the terrifying tale of a group of cops who stumble into an otherworldly realm.

Stream Now

5. Bates Motel 93%

(Photo by Joe Lederer/A&E)

Vera Farmiga, Freddie Highmore, Max Thieriot, and Olivia Cooke star in this reimagining of Norman Bates’ teenage years — those carefree days before he took over the family business and had to deal with constant nagging from Mother. Seasons 1-4 are available.

Stream Now

6. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) 99%

Arguably considered the first true horror film, this silent era classic tells the story of a traveling hypnotist with a murderous secret.

Stream Now

7. The Canal (2014) 72%

(Photo by The Orchard)

A film archivist discovers that the home he shares with his family was the site of a brutal murder and soon finds himself terrorized by evil visions and a dark presence in this Irish import.

Stream Now

8. Castlevania 94%

(Photo by Netflix)

This Netflix animated series based on the classic video game franchise centers on the last in a long line of monster hunters, who attempts to keep his country safe from a vengeful vampire.

Stream Now

9. Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (2005) 84%

(Photo by Warner Brothers courtesy Everett Collection)

Tim Burton’s first foray into stop-motion animation follows a young groom-to-be named Victor (voiced by Johnny Depp) who unwittingly marries an undead woman (Helena Bonham-Carter) while practicing his wedding vows.

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10. Creep (2014) 90%

(Photo by RADiUS-TWC)

Mark Duplass and director Patrick Brice star in Brice’s psychological thriller about an amateur videographer who agrees to film a man who lives in the woods for a day, only to discover the man may not be all that he seems.

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11. Cult of Chucky (2017) 79%

(Photo by Allen Fraser/Universal Pictures)

The latest installment of the long-running horror franchise finds the demonic doll terrorizing a woman in an asylum, while his old nemesis attempts to save her.

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12. A Dark Song (2016) 90%

(Photo by IFC Midnight)

This horror-tinged drama centers on two people who travel to a remote house to experiment with occult rituals.

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13. Deathgasm (2015) 88%

(Photo by MPI Media)

While trying to escape their restrictive lives, two teens in a heavy metal band perform a piece of forbidden music that unlocks the gates of hell.

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14. The Den (2014) 78%

(Photo by Bernard Hunt/IFC Midnight)

After witnessing what she believes is a murder on an internet video chat site, a young grad student decides to investigate it herself and becomes the next victim.

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15. The Devil's Candy (2015) 92%

(Photo by IFC Midnight)

Ethan Embry and Shiri Appleby star as a couple who move with their daughter into a new home, where the husband — and a deranged former resident who returns to terrorize them — is haunted by mysterious voices.

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16. Extraordinary Tales (2013) 58%

(Photo by Mélusine Productions)

Edgar Allan Poe’s dark words come to life in this animated anthology including stories such as “The Pit and the Pendulum” and “The Tell-Tale Heart,” narrated by the likes of Christopher Lee and Guillermo Del Toro.

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17. The Eyes of My Mother (2016) 78%

(Photo by Magnet Releasing)

This indie horror film centers on the immensely disturbing life led by a young woman after a shattering act of violence.

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18. Gerald's Game (2017) 91%

(Photo by Netflix)

Carla Gugino and Bruce Greenwood star in Mike Flanagan’s Netflix original adaptation of the Stephen King novel about a woman who is left chained to a bed when a sex game with her husband goes tragically wrong.

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19. Goosebumps (2015) 78%

(Photo by Columbia Pictures)

Jack Black stars in this fantasy adventure as author R.L. Stine, whose various Goosebumps creations come to life and terrorize his town. He must team up with his daughter and next door neighbor to stop the madness.

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20. The Hallow (2015) 70%

(Photo by IFC Midnight)

In this thriller from the UK, a young family moves in to a secluded house, disturbing an ancient evil that resides in the woods nearby.

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21. He Never Died (2015) 88%

(Photo by Vertical Entertainment)

Henry Rollins stars in this horror comedy about a grizzled depressive who literally cannot expire.

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22. Hellraiser (1987) 72%

(Photo by New World Releasing courtesy Everett Collection)

Clive Barker’s 1987 feature debut is a grisly affair that takes full advantage of his twisted imagination and births a memorable villain.

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23. The Host (2006) 93%

(Photo by Magnolia Pictures courtesy Everett Collection)

South Korea’s highest grossing film ever at the time of its release, The Host is director Bong Joon-ho’s breakout film, a sci-fi monster flick that combines scares, laughs, and satire in service of a popcorn flick as entertaining as it is intellectually satisfying.

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24. Housebound (2014) 95%

(Photo by Xlrator Media)

In this horror comedy from New Zealand, a woman sentenced to home confinement discovers her house is occupied by a malevolent spirit.

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25. Hush (2016) 93%

(Photo by Intrepid Pictures)

Kate Siegel plays a young deaf author living alone who is terrorized by a masked killer (John Gallagher Jr.)… who then turns the tables on her attacker.

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26. The Invitation (2015) 89%

(Photo by Drafthouse Films)

A man accepts an invitation to a dinner party hosted by his ex-wife, an unsettling affair that reopens old wounds and creates new tensions.

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27. It Follows (2014) 96%

(Photo by )

Maika Monroe stars as a suburban Michigan teen who becomes infected with a malevolent spirit after a sexual encounter, and it won’t stop pursuing her until she gives it to someone else — or dies.

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28. iZombie 92%

(Photo by Diyah Pera/The CW)

In this CW series loosely based on the DC comic, Rose McIver stars as Liv, a zombie who helps police solve murders by eating dead victims’ brains and absorbing their memories. Seasons 1-3 are available.

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29. Monsters (2010) 73%

(Photo by Magnet Releasing courtesy Everett Collection)

Scoot McNairy stars in this a low-budget sci-fi thriller about an attempt by the millitary to contain quarantined alien life.

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30. Penny Dreadful 91%

(Photo by Jonathan Hession/Showtime)

Eva Green and Timothy Dalton lead an ensemble cast in Showtime’s gothic supernatural drama, which draws characters from classic literature like Victor Frankenstein, Dorian Gray, and Dracula. All three seasons are available.

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31. Raw (2016) 92%

(Photo by Focus World)

This unusual horror/dark comedy/coming-of-age film centers on a lifelong vegetarian who discovers a taste for raw meat during her first year of veterinary school.

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32. The Returned 97%

(Photo by Haut Et Court/Canal +/Sundance Channel)

This French series, which aired in the US on SundanceTV and was subsequently remade in English, follows a small mountain community where the deceased begin reappearing, accompanied by unexplained supernatural phenomena. Both seasons are available.

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33. Santa Clarita Diet 89%

(Photo by Erica Parise/Netflix)

Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant star in this Netflix original horror-comedy about a suburban couple dealing with the wife’s sudden appetite for human flesh.

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34. Sharknado (2013) 74%

Tara Reid, Ian Ziering, and John Heard star in this eerily plausible sci-fi adventure about a devastating storm that facilitates a shark attack on Los Angeles.

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35. Sleepy Hollow (1999) 69%

Johnny Depp, Christina Ricci, and Christopher Walken star in Tim Burton’s take on the classic tale of Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman.

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36. Stake Land (2010) 74%

(Photo by GlassEyePix/IFC Films)

Directed by Jim Mickle, Stake Land is a post-apocalyptic indie horror road movie about vampire hunters that’s brimming with atmosphere.

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37. Starry Eyes (2014) 74%

(Photo by MPI Media Group)

This sci-fi horror hybrid tells the tale of an ambitious actress who is unwittingly enlisted by a sinister organization for a strange performance.

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38. Stranger Things 93%

(Photo by )

This wildly popular Netflix original series follows a group of precocious teens in a small Indiana town in 1983 as they attempt to make sense of the supernatural phenomena happening around them. Season 1 is available now, and season 2 is set to drop on October 27.

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39. Supernatural 93%

(Photo by Warner Bros. courtesy Everett Collection)

The demon-hunting Winchester brothers (played by Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles) continue their quest to fight evil wherever they find it in this long-running CW horror series. Seasons 1-12 are available to stream.

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40. Teeth (2007) 80%

(Photo by Weinstein Company courtesy Everett Collection)

Jess Weixler stars in this tongue-in-cheek horror comedy about a teenager who discovers she has teeth in her vagina. Yes, you read that correctly.

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41. They Look Like People (2015) 92%

(Photo by Gravitas Ventures)

This psychological thriller centers on a man who is convinced the world is on the verge of being overtaken by demons and attempts to hide his fear from a friend. Is he going mad, or is it real?

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42. Train to Busan (2016) 94%

(Photo by Well Go USA Entertainment)

This apocalyptic action-horror film from South Korea follows a group of passengers on a commuter train fighting to survive a zombie outbreak.

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43. The Transfiguration (2016) 85%

(Photo by Strand Releasing)

This thriller follows a trouble teen fascinated by vampires who meets another outcast and forms a potentially fraught bond with her.

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44. Trollhunter (2010) 82%

(Photo by Magnet Releasing courtesy Everett Collection)

This Norwegian found footage horror comedy follows a group of college students in pursuit of a suspected bear poacher who instead stumble upon an unexpected discovery.

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45. Under the Shadow (2016) 99%

(Photo by )

This acclaimed horror hybrid from debuting writer-director Babak Anvari is set in war-torn Tehran and centers on a mother and daughter who may or may not be suffering from the presence of a Djinn.

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46. The Void (2016) 77%

(Photo by Screen Media Films)

This horror film centers on the supernatural chaos that erupts after a policeman discovers a dying man and rushes him to treatment at a nearby hospital.

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47. The Wailing (2016) 99%

(Photo by Well Go USA)

This South Korean horror drama centers on a small town reeling from a series of brutal murders after the arrival of a mysterious stranger.

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48. The Walking Dead 80%

(Photo by Frank Ockenfels/AMC)

Thoughtful and gory in equal measure, AMC’s wildly popular action drama follows the lives of a handful of survivors in a post-apocalyptic world overrun by zombies. Seasons 1-7 are available.

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49. We Are Still Here (2015) 95%

(Photo by Dark Sky Films)

Writer/director Ted Geoghegan makes a strong, stylish feature debut with this horror story about a grieving couple who move to a secluded home after the tragic death of their son; little do they know that their new home has a bloody past.

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50. Wes Craven's New Nightmare (1994) 80%

(Photo by New Line Cinema)

Wes Craven’s New Nightmare is a self-conscious meta deconstruction of horror films that also happens to be one of the strongest entries in the Freddy Krueger saga.

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Abigail Hardingham, Keeley Hawes, David Morrissey in season 2 of The Missing (Robert Viglasky/New Pictures Limited/Starz)

Anthology series The Missing returns to Starz on February 12, with another compelling, mysterious, and heartbreaking story about child abduction.

The first season, which aired in 2014, concentrates on a British couple, who, while on vacation in France, have their only child disappear at a large public gathering. James Nesbitt and Frances O’Connor brilliantly play the anguished Hughes, who are living every parent’s worst nightmare as they desperately search for their missing son.

Although they receive help from Julien Baptiste (Tchéky Karyo), a French detective who specializes in finding missing children, the Hughes — particularly Tony Hughes — grow increasingly distraught as the leads and clues dry up. Jumping between different time frames — from the time of the abduction, to present day — we see how Tony’s desperation turns to obsession, and ultimately, how he is never able to find closure.

In Season 2, the new case centers on British girl Alice Webster (Abigail Hardingham), who seemingly returns to her family after being abducted 11 years prior. Her father, Sam (David Morrissey), a British military officer stationed in Germany, and mother, Gemma (Keeley Hawes), a teacher on the base, are overwhelmed by their daughter’s return and the impact it makes on their lives. This is further complicated when Alice says she was with another missing girl, Sophie Giroux.

Detective Baptiste comes out of retirement to revisit the Giroux case he worked on years before, and together with a British military investigator on the base, Eve (Laura Fraser), they try to find Sophie and apprehend the girls’ captor. Once again using the multi–time frame device, we jump between 2014, when Alice returns, to present day and see how the events have affected the family and the community, all while trying to still solve the crime.

Morrissey recently spoke with Rotten Tomatoes about playing this broken father who is desperate to stitch his daughter and family together like it used to be and how the series so expertly weaves the emotional turmoil of a very real tragedy into a mesmerizing whodunit.

Morrissey also talks about how he still gets recognized for his work on The Walking Dead and how different the Governor is to the AMC series’ current villain, Negan.


Season 2 of The Missing (New Pictures Limited/Starz)

Kit Bowen for Rotten Tomatoes: What were your initial thoughts about this new take on child abduction?

David Morrissey: I loved the first season. I thought it was intriguing, emotional, and also the whole sense of not only a whodunit, but why was it done and where are they going.

But this season is different. It does begin with the abduction of a child, but then it’s about the return of a child. This family – mother, father, daughter, and son — the daughter is taken away 11 years before our story starts. The story starts with her walking back into their lives, and it’s about how not just the family, but how the community copes with this girl coming back into their lives.

It’s unimaginable to think about, as a parent myself, 11 years wondering what’s happened to your daughter. Where is she, is she still out there? But then to have their dreams answered, and she does walk back in, it turns out to be very complicated. It’s not the ending that they want. There’s no solace in it. The shame and guilt is magnified in this girl’s presence.

It also acts as this wedge between the mother and the father. He is so desperate for his daughter to be back, desperate to clean the slate, to start again and be a father again, to protect his daughter again. But while he is blindsided by that desire to go back to how things were, his wife is much more questioning, more suspicious of it. It’s less of a cathartic place for her, and that causes a terrible wedge between them.


avid Morrissey in season 2 of The Missing (Sophie Mutevelian/New Pictures Limited/Starz)

RT: What sort of research did you do to prepare for the role?

Morrissey: I didn’t speak with any parents, because I felt that was a little stepping over the line. There’s a sense of being not too invasive in this. Instead, I read a lot of testimonies from people that it had happened to and who had gone through it. There’re quite a few books, and one or two very famous cases in the U.K. of child abduction, in which they wrote books about their experience and heartbreaks. So I read a lot, and many of them were about people whose children were still missing. That idea of not having closure is what’s so terrible.

My character, Sam, in particular, is desperate for closure, which is the most human aspect of all us, really. We all want to make sense of stuff even when there’s no sense out there. That desire to have control over our lives and make sense of it and have some kind of closure over incidents that have happened to us sometimes drives into terrible situations with ourselves. It just makes things worse.


Keeley Hawes in season 2 of The Missing (Sophie Mutevelian/New Pictures Limited/Starz)

RT: Working with Keeley Hawes, the two of you have so many heavy scenes together. How would you get out of that space?

Morrissey: I’ve worked with Keeley before, but with this, it takes a lot out of you. Keeley and I are both parents ourselves, and the days were long and emotional. At the end of the day, we would go and sit down and just have a laugh about stuff, you know? Because it was so draining on you and asked so much of you. It was tough, so I couldn’t wish for anyone better to be in that situation than her.

RT: Sam’s relationship with Eve is also complicated. Can you talk about that?

Morrissey: Without giving too much away, their relationship was very dark and punishing. There was nothing joyous about it. It’s self-destructive. But it’s an important part of the story as well. When bad things happen like that, sometimes people want more misery. They want to heap it on. They feel they deserve it.


Abigail Hardingham, Tcheky Karyo, Laura Fraser in season 2 of The Missing (Robert Viglasky/New Pictures Limited/Starz)

RT: Besides being such a compelling mystery, it’s also a real statement on the human condition, would you agree?

Morrissey: It is. I think Sam particularly feels terrible guilt, terrible shame about what has happened. He is a soldier. He’s a man who’s used to solving problems in a manly way just through action. He’s had his nuts cut off in a way, and he doesn’t have the emotional makeup to be able to see inside, that it’s not his fault in any way. But he has to blame, he has to kick out, and for 11 years, he didn’t have anyone to blame but himself. Then once the girl comes back, he starts to blame, it starts to eat away inside him. It’s so hard seeing a man so consumed by grief and heartache.

Also when something like this happens, of course it affects the family, but it’s about how it affects the community. And how rumor, fear, gossip, the repercussions of an event like this around people and how it creates a vacuum in which evil can exist inside of. Suddenly, their whole way of viewing their life goes into a tailspin. Even for the family themselves, they get sympathy from the community, but the longer it goes on, the more suspicion falls on them. You can grieve for so long, but can’t grieve for too long, because you’re sort of affecting us now. There’s a real sense that this event is ink in the water of the community, and it just poisons everybody.


Madi Linnard in season 2 of The Missing (Sophie Mutevelian/New Pictures Limited/Starz)

RT: What an amazing job the show also does going back and forth between different time frames to create the intrigue.

Morrissey: That’s another thing I loved about this show and the first show, the multi–time frames. So you, as an audience, are watching the daughter quickly coming back into our lives, you see the impact that has on the family in 2014. Then suddenly you’re catapulted into present day, and you see my character is not only scarred emotionally, but also physically. Burn scars all over his back and face, and you go, “What happened to this guy?!”

Other characters are changed as well. The French detective Julien Baptiste goes from being a very alive, very active person to suddenly his head is shaved and he is in the middle of Iraq. He’s got this limp and it looks like he is suffering. In a very active way, you’re going, “What’s happened to these people?! What’s going on?” And then you go back to 2014, again. It’s that puzzle you get the whole time, which is a very exciting ride, I think.


Abigail Hardingham in season 2 of The Missing (Robert Viglasky/New Pictures Limited/Starz)

RT: Such a great ride. Watching the show felt very much like reading a novel, like introducing a character and then reading, “…and that’s the last time anyone saw him” and you’re yelling, “Why?!” and have to read on to find out.

Morrissey: Exactly. In the U.K., season 2 came out just before Christmas. Eight weeks before Christmas. Just walking on the streets, people would come up to me and give me their theories. They didn’t want me to tell them what’s going on, but the excitement in their eyes, where they themselves were playing detectives. And they’re saying, “I know what’s happened!” and this is this, this person is that. It was fascinating. It just caught people’s imagination. Every week on Twitter, it was the No. 1 trending topic for days afterwards. Giving their theories on what had unfolded in front of them. I think that’s such a great process to be involved with.


The Governor (David Morrissey) - The Walking Dead 408 (Gene Page/AMC)

RT: Speaking of water-cooler shows, how is life after The Walking Dead? Do you still get recognized as the Governor?

Morrissey: Look, I’m very proud of The Walking Dead. It is a world phenomenon. People mostly come up to say, “I love to hate you.” There is that sense of playing someone so horrible in that show, but the show is such a phenomenon, it’s great! But even all around the world. I was recently filming in Prague, just after The Missing, to do a show over there, just walking around the streets there, people recognized me. It’s amazing. But 99 percent of the people I meet who love the show, know it’s a show and are very complimentary about my work inside it. It’s just great to associated with something that is so popular.


RT: Right now, I’d take the Governor any day over the horrible Negan.
Morrissey: Oh, I know! [Laughs] I think the Governor could run for office tomorrow, and he might be OK. I know Jeffrey Dean Morgan, we’ve worked together, and I love him so. I’ve not seen this last season, I only saw the [Season 6] finale. But I know he’s killing it, and he’s such a great guy and great actor, so it’s wonderful to hear the reactions.

RT: Unlike Negan, though, there was always a vulnerability to the Governor. You kind of felt for him.

Morrissey: The key for me with the Governor was his daughter. It was very human thing to keep her there, and to keep her close, and to try to get back to some normality. Even though it was quite weird, him combing her hair and stuff like that, but he wanted to keep her close. That’s very human, loving thing.

Of course, then events played into his hands, and he turned totally psychotic but what was so great in the writing, is that in Season 4 when he comes back, he’s a man who has changed. He’s a man who is trying to fight the dark side, and loses that fight, but that’s why he doing it. He’s not indulging the dark side, he just knows it’s there.

The Missing season 2 premieres Sunday, February 12 at 8 p.m. ET/PT on Starz; all episodes will be available on demand and on the Starz app on the day of the premiere


Where does season 4’s heartbreaking episode “The Grove” stand compared to season 5’s emotional premiere “No Sanctuary“? Find out in our infographic tracking the Tomatometer score of every episode of The Walking Dead so far.

CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE 

The Walking Dead season 7 premieres Sunday, Oct. 23 at 9 p.m. ET on AMC

http://rottentomatoes.tumblr.com/post/139818561214/8-favorite-richonne-moments-from-last-nights

It’s the end of the year and, as we see it, you have two choices: waste hours of your life trying to find fun, or enjoy hours of your life, bringing the fun to your living room. To facilitate the latter, we’ve put together a list of the best TV marathons happening this week so you can ring in the new year with style! (And by style, we mean footie pajamas and central heating.)


Ash vs. Evil Dead Marathon
Starz, Monday, Dec. 28 through Wednesday, Dec. 30, starting at 9 p.m.
TV’s favorite chin (sorry, Jay Leno) is getting his own TV marathon, starting tonight when Starz will play every episode of Ash vs. Evil Dead starring Bruce Campbell. For three nights this week, catch three half-hour episodes of Sam Raimi‘s cult classic rebooted for TV just in time for Saturday’s season one finale!

 

The Walking Dead and Fear Marathons
AMC, Tuesday, Dec. 29, starting at 2 p.m.
For that niche group of doomsday’ers who believe that with the New Year comes the end of the world, feast on the fall of humanity with a mega TWD marathon, which will include every episode since the beginning of season two (not sure why they skipped the six hours of season one, but you can watch them now on Netflix), and wrapping up with the latest episode, “Start to Finish.” The marathon will also feature all six episodes of Fear the Walking Dead.

 


Mr. Robot Marathon
USA Network, Tuesday, Dec. 29, starting at 11 p.m.
Watch every episode of the first season of Mr. Robot, considered by critics everywhere to be one of the best shows of 2015. Whether you’re meeting Elliot for the first time, or giving fsociety a second look, this is one marathon that’s sure to keep you questioning everything into the New Year.

 

The Twilight Zone Marathon
Syfy, Wednesday, Dec. 30, starting at 7 p.m.
For its 21st annual marathon of The Twilight Zone, Syfy will air all 156 episodes of Rod Serling’s legendary TV series chronologically in HD — a first for the network. If you can’t make time for the entire 87-hour marathon, be sure to DVR “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet” starring William Shatner and “The Encounter” starring George Takei. Other highlights include “Time Enough At Last,” “Living Doll,” “To Serve Man,” and “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.”

 

Breaking Bad Weekly Marathons
SundanceTV, starting Wednesday, Dec. 30 at 9 p.m.
Here’s a marathon you can savor for weeks to come. Beginning on Dec. 30, SundanceTV will run four episodes of the highly-acclaimed series Breaking Bad starring Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul every week in chronological order until they air all five seasons (which, by our count, should take you all the way through April). Not a bad start to the year — by the time you finish the marathon, it’s already a third over. Yeah, bitch!

 

The Twilight Zone (2002) Marathon
El Rey Network, Thursday, Dec. 31, starting at 6 a.m.
Black and white not your thing? El Rey is hosting a 24-hour marathon of the 2002 remake of The Twilight Zone, which aired for just one season on UPN and featured host Forest Whitaker in the Rod Serling role as narrator. Be sure to look out for “One Night at Mercy,” starring Seinfeld‘s Jason Alexander as Death; “The Pool Guy” with Lou Diamond Phillips as the titular pool cleaner; and “Cradle of Darkness,” featuring Katherine Heigl on a time-traveling mission to kill baby Hitler.

 

Doctor Who Marathon
BBC America, Thursday, Dec. 31, at 6 a.m.
It’s a bit of a random sampling over 24 hours, but after this year’s stellar season, who doesn’t want more Doctor Who? This New Year’s Eve marathon will feature episodes from series two and three, plus a smattering of holiday specials, including “Voyage of the Damned,” “The Next Doctor,” “The Snowman,” and “The Husbands of River Song.”

 

The Thin Man Marathon
TCM, Thursday, Dec. 31, starting at 5 p.m.
Make your New Year’s timeless with TCM’s marathon of Thin Man movies, starring Myrna Loy and William Powell as master husband-and-wife sleuthing team Nick and Nora Charles. The network will run all six classic films, starting with The Thin Man, and following with After the Thin Man, Another Thin Man, Shadow of the Thin Man, The Thin Man Goes Home, and Song of the Thin Man.

 

The Simpsons New Year’s Resolutions” Marathon
FXX, Thursday, Dec. 31, starting at 6 p.m.
Kicking off with The Simpsons Movie, FXX will ring in the New Year, Springfield-style, with 30 hours of resolution-themed programming featuring Marge, Homer, and the rest of the gang as they make life-changing decisions over a 27-season time period.

 

The A-Team Marathon
Encore Classic, Thursday, Dec. 31, starting at 7 p.m.
We pity the fool who misses this 24-hour marathon featuring a “crack commando unit” who survives the Los Angeles underground by working as soldiers of fortune. Highlights include a guest-star appearance from Hulk Hogan and Murdoch’s big win on Wheel of Fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help — and if you can find them — maybe you can binge-watch The A-Team.

Even with over 20 new shows premiering in September (not to mention all the existing series returning with new seasons), we can’t blame you for wanting to binge whole seasons of tried-and-true TV. This month, we’ve pulled together a collection of shows for your bingeing pleasure, including some off-the-radar series, and a few biggies that you need to start right now if you want to catch up before they come back!


The Walking Dead: Season 1 (2010) 87%

What it is: A disparate group of people attempts to survive the zombie apocalypse; existential malaise and bloody mayhem ensues.

Why you should watch it: We’re not gonna lie: The Walking Dead has its share of dead patches and dull characters. But the basic setup is so compelling — how would you respond if the whole world went to hell? — that you’re likely to press on regardless. Plus, when it comes to creative zombie slaughter, this show can’t be beat — you get the feeling that every stabbing, every shooting, every beheading has been lovingly conceived and executed by some of the finest craftspeople in the business. Season six premieres on October 11, so you’d better start catching up now!

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Netflix, PlayStation, Vudu, and XBox.

Commitment: 69 hours.


American Horror Story: Murder House: Murder House (2011) 72%

What it is: American Horror Story is the show that kick-started the recent anthology trend, with shows like Fargo and American Crime picking up the cue. Each season of AHS is its own horror-themed storyline (a haunted house, a demonic asylum, a home-school for young witches, a carnival freak show, and finally, this year, a terrifying hotel), often using the same cast members in different roles.

Why you should watch it: Audiences who scare easily are terrified by it. The rest of us eat it up. The shocks keep coming; if you don’t like one twist, you know there will soon be another jaw-dropper around the corner! And the most intriguing new(ish) development is the unraveling of inter-season stories that are connected with each other (most evident so far in season four). Season five premieres on FX on Saturday, Oct. 7.

Where to watch: All four seasons are available on Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, PlayStation, Vudu, and on DVD and Blu-ray. The first three seasons are also available on Amazon Prime, Hulu, and Netflix.

Commitment: 55 hours.


How to Get Away With Murder: Season 1 (2015) 85%

What it is: Annalise Keating (Viola Davis) is a criminal defense attorney and professor teaching law students how to defend the accused, while tangling them up in a real-life murder mystery of their own.

Why you should watch it: Viola Davis’ Emmy-nominated performance, mixed with the twisty drama stylings of Shondaland Productions (Scandal, Grey’s Anatomy) will deliver a barrage of riveting mystery right into your lap. A darker tone than Grey’s and Scandal, HTGAWM has surprised audiences with its unrelenting, austere tone, permeated with intense character drama. With the premiere of its second season coming up on September 24, you should have enough time to run through season one before things heat up again.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, PlayStation, Vudu, and on DVD.

Commitment: 10.5 hours.


Bob's Burgers: Season 5 (2014) 100%

What it is: Bob and Linda Belcher run a restaurant with the help of children Tina, Gene, and Louise. Between the funeral home next door, a relentless health inspector, the children’s misadventures, and Bob‘s unreliable business strategies, the restaurant is always struggling to stay open.

Why you should watch it: Bob’s Burgers is a funny animated sitcom full of satirical and absurd situations that works both as a family and a workplace comedy. All the main characters have strong and quirky personalities, and you will quickly find yourself picking favorites. Even though the show received mixed reviews when it came out in 2011, it won critics’ praise over the time, and currently has two seasons at 100% on the Tomatometer. Season six premieres on September 27.

Where to watch: AmazonFox.com (five most recent episodes), Hulu (season five),  iTunesGoogle PlayNetflix (seasons one through four), PlayStationVudu, and Xbox.

Commitment: 33 hours.


PRISON BREAK

What it is: A man is framed by an organization known as “The Company” and sentenced to death for murdering the brother of the Vice President of the United States. His own brother then devises an elaborate plan to have himself thrown into the same prison in order to break them both out.

Why you should watch it: The show was nominated for several awards when it first premiered in 2005, including a Golden Globe for Best Television Series Drama, and is now enjoying a second life thanks to its popularity on Netflix. No matter how outrageous the plot in Prison Break, you can’t help but root for the siblings as they fight for their freedom in and out of prison over four seasons. Plus, Fox recently announced a forthcoming reboot, so now is the perfect time to lock yourself up with Wentworth Miller and Dominic Purcell.

Where to watch: All four seasons are available on Amazon, Google PlayiTunes, Netflix, and PlayStation, plus DVD and Blu-ray.

Commitment: 56 hours.


The League: Season 5 (2013) 71%

What it is: A Chicago-set ensemble comedy about five guys (Mark Duplass, Stephen Rannazzisi, Nick KrollPaul Scheer, and Jon Lajoie) and one gal (Katie Aselton) whose obsession with fantasy football begets hilarious trash-talk, outrageous deceit, and harebrained schemes.

Why you should watch it: In a lot of ways, The League is a throwback to ’90s network sitcoms about wacky friends — only it’s been updated with the raunchiness of an FX comedy. Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm alum Jeff Schaffer created The League along with his wife, Jackie Marcus Schaffer, so you can expect intricately woven — and often absurdly conceived — plots with heavily improvised interplay skewering pop culture, friendship, parenting, sex, religion, drugs, and, of course, insane football fandom.

Where to watch: All six seasons are available on Amazon Prime, Google Play, Hulu, iTunes, Netflix, PlayStationXbox, and Vudu; season seven premieres on FXX on September 9.

Commitment: 27 hours.


Homeland: Season 1 (2011) 100%

What it is: Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes), a bipolar CIA agent, works overtime to prevent a terrorist attacks on American soil.

Why you should watch it: If ever there was a series that consistently left you with your mouth agape in shock at the end — and sometimes, even in the middle — of each episode, this is it. Homeland is often unbearably tense, not just because of its national security plotlines, but also because of the personalities (and often opaque motives) of its characters, who are played with aplomb by Danes, Damian Lewis, Mandy Patinkin, and Rupert Friend. If you really put your mind to it, you might be able to get caught up before season five premieres on October 4.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Showtime Anytime, Vudu, and XBox.

Commitment: 48 hours.


Difficult People: Season 1 (2015) 88%

What it is: Difficult People is a new comedy on Hulu, executive produced by Amy Poehler. Julie Klausner and Billy Eichner star as struggling performers in New York who hate just about everyone, except each other.

Why you should watch it: Critics say the show succeeds in making the unlikable likable with mean-spirited, unhappy characters who can’t help but amuse. A talented supporting cast and an impressive array of guest spots and cameos keep the laughs up and the cringes to a minimum. Plus, Difficult People is Certified Fresh at 85 percent on the Tomatometer, and it’s airing right now.

Where to watch: Difficult People is available exclusively on Hulu.

Commitment: 2.5 hours currently (new episodes are available on Wednesdays), so not difficult at all.


Longmire: Season 1 (2012) 86%

What it is: Robert Taylor is gruff and gritty as Sheriff Walt Longmire, a complicated hero who dutifully fights the bad guys in big sky Wyoming, following the tradition of screen cowboys John Wayne and Clint Eastwood.

Why you should watch it: Blending case-of-the-week with a slow-burning multi-season arc, Longmire is the strong, silent type, thanks to fine acting from its leads — Taylor, whose character is coming to grips with his wife’s death; Katee Sackhoff as the mysterious deputy sheriff Vic Moretti; and Lou Diamond Phillips as Walt’s good friend Henry Standing Bear. Axed by A&E after three seasons (and a humdinger of a cliffhanger), Longmire will return for a fourth season on Netflix on Thursday, September 10.

Where to watch: The first three seasons are available on Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Netflix, Vudu, and Xbox.

Commitment: 25 hours.


Supernatural: Season 10 (2014) 100%

What it is: Supernatural is a fantasy horror show on The CW that follows the Winchester brothers (Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles) as they battle vampires, werewolves, demons, ghosts and other monsters from the supernatural world.

Why you should watch it: The series enjoys an obsessive cult following, and the show seems to keep picking up speed like a 1967 Impala. Nine of its 10 seasons (all the ones that have a score) are Fresh on the Tomatometer, which is a credit to its consistency. Season 11 premieres on October 7, so if you binge like a bat out of hell, you might be able to catch up.

Where to watch: Seasons one through 10 are available on Amazon, Google Play, Hulu, Netflix, PlayStation, Vudu, and Xbox. Seasons one through nine are available in a DVD or Blu-ray box set, and season ten is on both DVD and Blu-ray.

Commitment: Hopefully watching 215 hours of demon-hunting doesn’t scare you away.

This week on home video, we’ve got an Oscar-winning documentary, a star-studded romantic dramedy, an Oscar-nominated Criterion drama, a couple of cult classics, an oddball action flick, and a couple more. Read on for details:


The Walking Dead: Season 5 (2014) 90%

Thoughtful and gory in equal measure, AMC’s wildly popular action drama follows the lives of a handful of survivors in a post-apocalyptic world overrun by zombies. You can catch up on the fifth season in time for the season six premiere on October 11.

Get it Here


Citizenfour (2014) 96%

This Academy Award-winning documentary chronicles NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s life in exile.

Get it Here


Two Days One Night (2014) 97%

Marion Cotillard stars in the Dardenne brothers’ Certified Fresh, Oscar-nominated drama about a woman who tries to return to work after suffering a nervous breakdown.

Get it Here


Aloha (2015) 20%

In Cameron Crowe’s latest, Bradley Cooper stars as a pilot who travels to Hawaii to work for a private space firm, where he falls for fellow pilot Allison (Emma Stone) and reconnects with his ex Tracy (Rachel McAdams).

Get it Here


Big Game (2014) 78%

Samuel L. Jackson and Ray Stevenson star in an action adventure about a teenager who helps to save the president of the United States after Air Force One is shot down.

Get it Here


Iris (2014) 98%

This Certified Fresh documentary portrait of fashion maven Iris Apfel was the final film from legendary documentarian Albert Maysles.

Get it Here


Skin Trade (2014) 25%

Dolph Lundgren and Tony Jaa star an action thriller about two guys on the trail of the head of a human trafficking cartel.

Get it Here


The Last Dragon (1985) 55%

(In Blu-ray) Motown meets martial arts in this tale of a budding karate master in love with a DJ who happens to be a gangster’s girlfriend.

Get it Here


Vampire Hunter D (1985) 78%

This anime cult classic — about a young girl who goes to battle against a wide variety of bizarre creatures — is sci-fi/fantasy of a decidedly gothic stripe.

Get it Here

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