We’re reaching the dog days of summer, people! Sometimes, you’ve just gotta post up in front of the air conditioner between trips to the beach and enjoy a nice TV binge. That’s where we come in. With several returning sophomore series and two long-running favorites bidding adieu, there’s plenty to keep you busy this August. Catch it all below.


Dear White People 95% (Netflix)

What it is: Based on writer-director Justin Simien’s 2014 film of the same name, Dear White People takes place on a predominantly white Ivy League college campus and, through the perspective of several different African-American characters, explores and satirizes the racial tensions, microaggressions, and social injustices experienced while there.

Why you should watch it:  As funny as it is revealing, this ensemble piece for Netflix fearlessly goes where other network and primetime programs don’t dare to, not just representing the current social and political climate, but crystallizing lasting truths within it. Airtight scripts and a bevy of standout performances make the upcoming third season a must-watch for fans new and old. Season 3 premieres in full Aug. 2 on Netflix.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours (for the first two seasons)


Preacher 87% (AMC)

What it is: Sam Catlin, Evan Goldberg, and Seth Rogen teamed up back in 2016 to adapt Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon’s cult comic book about a preacher named Jesse Custer (Dominic Cooper) who’s on a violently allegorical quest to “find God” — plus vampires, exploding holy men, extraterrestrial entities, and gun-slinging exes (played by Ruth Negga, no less). The series, now entering its fourth and final season on AMC, has reached comparable cult status.

Why you should watch it: If the above soundbite wasn’t at least enticing, this series is probably not for you. But if your interest is piqued, Preacher is sheer perfection. Unapologetically bloody, brazen, and bad to the bone, this series came at the height of peak genre TV and to this day runs with the best of them. Season 4 premieres Aug. 4 on AMC.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 25 hours (for the first three seasons)


GLOW 92% (Netflix)

What it is: From creators Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch, GLOW (taken from the real-life ’80s entertainment series, Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling), follows a pair of down-and-out actresses who unwittingly find themselves cast in a televised women’s wrestling league. Following both their personal and professional lives, the dramedy centers on Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie), Debbie Eagan (Betty Gilpin), and the man who runs the league, Sam Sylvia (Marc Maron).

Why you should watch it: On paper, GLOW sounds like the kind of series that’s just so crazy it might work. Then again, it is from producer Jenji Kohan (Weeds, Orange Is the New Black), so it boasts a creative team that has a track record of doing just that. Utterly unique in the world of the half-hour dramedy, this standout series is lead by a stellar cast of kickass ladies (and even more behind the camera). Season 3 premieres in full Aug. 9 on Netflix.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours (for the first two seasons)


RELATED:Video: GLOW Stars Alison Brie, Marc Maron, and Betty Gilpin Play ‘Wrestler or Rapper’


Succession 93% (HBO)

What it is: Succession is all about what happens when powerful people behave badly and — sometimes — are faced with consequences. Charting one media mogul family’s changing of the guard (with back-stabbing, side-dealing, and bribing a-plenty), the series, from creator Jesse Armstrong, stars Jeremy Strong, Kieran Culkin, Sarah Snook, Natalie Gold, and Emmy winner Brian Cox as the central Roy family patriarch.

Why you should watch it: If HBO viewers love two things, it’s watching disparate characters fighting for a throne (hello, Game of Thrones) and extreme, dramatic family discord (Six Feet Under, The Sopranos, Big Love…need we go on?). Fortunately, the power-hungry media family of Succession has both in spades, and it boasts top-tier performances to match. Why else would it be recognized with a fistful of 2019 Emmy nominations, including best drama series? Catch up before season 2 premieres Aug. 11 on HBO.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, HBO NowMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours (for the first season)


Lodge 49 93% (AMC)

What it is: Set in the sun-drenched but dry-spelled locale of Long Beach, California, creator Jim Gavin’s Lodge 49 follows ex-surfer and current burnout Dud Dudley (Wyatt Russell, son of Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn) as he tries to get his life back together by going with the flow — a fate that brings him to the adrift, philosophically-minded community of Lodge 49.

Why you should watch it: What an odd little series Lodge 49 is, but if you stick with it, the magic that’s at play slowly comes to the fore and makes the experience all the more worthwhile. To say much more of the fate that’s in store for viewers of this wholly-original hour-long comedy is to do a disservice to its long-view intention, but you won’t be sorry for following Russell’s “The Dude”–esque hero to the titular lodge’s doorstep. Season 2 premieres Aug. 12 on AMC.

Where to watch it: Amazon, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft

Commitment: Approx. 7.5 hours (for the first season)


The Terror 87% (AMC)

What it is: Based on Dan Simmons’ 2007 novel of the same name, The Terror is a horror anthology series from creators David Kajganich, Max Borenstein, and Alexander Woo. Season 1 takes the real-world tragedy of the 1845 disappearance and ultimate mass death aboard two British expedition ships and fictionalizes it as a tale of monsters and survival.

Why you should watch it: While it’s an anthology series, you’d be remiss to skip out on The Terror’s first season before tuning into round 2: The Terror: Infamy. Creatively suspenseful, tragic, and altogether horrifying, it’s a 10-episode order that fans of the genre will love. Season 2 premieres Aug. 12 on AMC.

Where to watch it: Amazon, Google Play, HuluMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 8 hours (for the first season)


RELATED:The Terror Truths Revealed in a Gruesome Finale and Insights from the Horror Series’ Showrunners


Sacred Games 76% (Netflix)

What it is: Netflix’s first original series made in India is a doozy of a police thriller. Based on Vikram Chandra’s 2006 novel of the same name, Sacred Games follows Sartaj Singh of the Mumbai police as he battles personal demons and dives head-first into the city’s dark underbelly of crime and corruption in an effort to save it.

Why you should watch it: The series begins with an anonymous call to Sartaj claiming that a looming disaster will wipe out Mumbai’s population in 25 days. Sacred Games’ race-against-the-clock premise does wonders here, keeping viewers on the edge of their seats and eager for more. Season 2 premieres in full Aug. 15 on Netflix.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 6.5 hours (for the first season)


Mindhunter 97% (Netflix)

What it is: Mindhunter follows FBI agents Holden Ford and Bill Tench — co-founders, along with psychologist Wendy Carr, of the Bureau’s Behavioral Science Unit — as they interview imprisoned serial killers in hopes of understanding patterns of behavior and solving open murder cases in 1977.

Why you should watch it: Ripped from the pages of Mindhunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit by John E. Douglas and Mark Olshaker, Joe Penhall’s twisty series from executive producers David Fincher and Charlize Theron will keep you guessing to the very end — which is exactly why it became a bit of a phenomenon at the time of its 2017 premiere. Now, two years later, an excellent Jonathan Groff returns as Agent Ford to tackle one of the best-known killers of our time: Charles Manson. Season 2 premieres in full Aug. 16 on Netflix.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 8 hours (for the first season)


RELATED:Mindhunter Stars on Diving Too Deep Into Serial Killer Psychology, Hopes for Season 2


The Affair 86% (Showtime)

What it is: As the old adage goes, love is a battlefield, and with The Affair, we’re here to witness some emotional warfare. The titular indiscretion comes about when Alison and Noah meet on Long Island, consummate their desires, and in turn destroy their respective marriages to Cole and Helen, respectively. The Affair is told through the four main players’ rotating perspectives.

Why you should watch it: The Golden Globes love to honor a rookie series, but it’s not for nothing that The Affair swept the ceremony after its first season by winning best drama series and best lead actress for Ruth Wilson. Maura Tierney then went on to win for her supporting turn the following year. Male leads Dominic West and Joshua Jackson, though lacking trophies for their roles, are also stellar. Dense and emotionally trying as it may be, they each play characters that you’ll feel for as the dissipation of their happiness and potential reconciliation plays out each week. As the seasons progress, The Affair ups its drama and stakes until what is sure to be a blistering finale. Its fifth and final season premieres Aug. 25 on Showtime.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 40 hours (for the first four seasons)


Power 81% (Starz)

What it is: From creator Courtney Kemp Agboh and starring Omari Hardwick as main anti-hero James St. Patrick, Power charts James’ life as he runs a popular nightclub in New York City while moonlighting as an underground drug kingpin. How he keeps it all together while leading a double life is just the tip of the iceberg of this series’ juicy, dramatic hit.

Why you should watch it: Over the course of its five seasons, this gritty crime drama has succeeded with a formidable ensemble cast, providing criminally compelling and gloriously soapy performances. Its sixth and final season, which will be split into two halves between 2019 and and 2020, premieres Aug. 25 on Starz.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, MicrosoftVudu

Commitment: About 50 hours (for the five seasons)


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“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” stars Henry Simmons as Agent Alphonso “Mack” MacKenzie. (ABC/Kurt Iswarienkio ); MARVEL'S CLOAK & DAGGER - "Suicide Sprints" - EMMA LAHANA (Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani); Marvel's Luke Cage star Alfre Woodard (Cara Howe/Netflix); Black Lightning - China Anne McClain as Jennifer Pierce (Richard Ducree/The CW); Riverdale -- Casey Cott as Kevin (Katie Yu/The CW

(Photo by ABC/Kurt Iswarienkio; Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani; Cara Howe/Netflix; Richard Ducree/The CW; Katie Yu/The CW)

Sometimes the major heroes of television shows based on comic books just need some support. It can be in the form of a best friend, a worthy opponent, a character to carry a secondary plot or someone just to be there and literally tell the main character that they’re doing a great job. Characters can start out as the latter and emerge as fan favorites. They can also remain on the periphery of the frame, offering commentary or a key piece of info. And then there are also a few who are just criminally underutilized.

So let’s celebrate the characters who help make the heroes look good, be they guests, recurring parts, or reliable presences. Here are a few of the best supporting characters in 2018.


M’yrnn J’onnz (Carl Lumbly) | Supergirl 88%

In some ways, it is a cheat to bring the superlative Carl Lumbly onto Supergirl as J’onn J’onzz’s (David Harewood) father M’yrrn. But as Lumbly defined the role of the Martian Manhunter on television – he voiced J’onn in the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated series – it was also fitting to bring that persona of dignity and gravitas to the part.

In doing so, it opened up M’yrnn to a wealth of new experiences and some of the best moments in Supergirl’s third season. His delight in discovering coffee, his karaoke night with the gang, and J’onn’s attempt to give them more of a family life by moving them both out of the DEO and into an apartment all revealed added and welcome dimensions for both characters. Sadly, Lumbly and M’yrnn were not to be permanent additions, as the writing team saw fit to almost immediately give the character a degenerative brain disease. But even as that story line continued to its inevitable conclusion, both performer and character embraced their scripted fate with dignity and a performance far beyond the material as written.


Herr Klaus Starr (Pip Torrens) | Preacher 87%

As opposed to his comic-book counterpart, it is easy to imagine the Herr Starr of AMC’s Preacher would like a quiet retirement. Despite being the most efficient and ruthless agent of The Grail, the strain it puts on him is easy to see even as he carries out its directives. It is also the underlying reason why he’d rather see Jesse (Dominic Cooper) become the Messiah over The Grail’s inbred scion Humperdoo (Tyson Ritter). Granted, any sane person would make that choice as well, even in the insane world of the show.

But for all his motivations and skills, the guy can’t catch a break and finds himself forever at Jesse’s heels, even when he should have the upperhand. That said, it seems he finally has a way to hold sway over Jesse thanks to a deal with Gran’ma Marie (Betty Buckley) and the ever-present carrot of Jesse’s Genesis-infused soul. Will he finally get everything he wants exactly how he wants it?

Well, if the show follows even just 10 percent of Starr’s story from the comics, it seems unlikely. Nonetheless, it makes Starr the best of the supporting foils on Preacher.


Sheriff Randy Nedly (Greg Lawson) | Wynonna Earp 92%

As the top lawman in Purgatory, Sheriff Nedly would like nothing more than to see the town resume its sleepy ways. But that’s really a front, as he has always known Purgatory and the surrounding Ghost River Triangle is a magnet for supernatural happenings. He does his best to keep the strange incidents Wynonna (Melanie Scrofano) and her friends get into from becoming public knowledge. And while initially standoffish with Black Badge Division agent Xavier Dolls (Shamier Anderson), he ultimately embraced his presence as another line of defense against the demonic forces in the region. He also proved to be an able mentor to Officer Nicole Haught (Katherine Barrell), a woman who, like Nedly, seems destined to tangle with the unexplained.

And yet, Nedly faces those horrors with a quip and that gruff, irritable manner we saw in the first season — even if he has become something of a teddy bear to the main cast. He faced down the widows of Sheriff Clootie by asking if they were Pokemon and had, perhaps, the best reaction to being glamored by vampires by dropping his irascible facade entirely and embracing an ascot. Nedly may not be a constant presence on the show, but he is definitely welcome whenever he appears.


Malcolm Ducasse (Eka Darville) | Marvel - Jessica Jones 83%

Marvel's Jessica Jones, Season 2, EPISODE 1, PHOTO CREDIT David Giesbrecht/Netflix, PICTURED Eka Darville

(Photo by David Giesbrecht/Netflix)

Malcolm has come so far since his days as Killgrave’s (David Tennant) victim and Jessica’s (Krysten Ritter) junkie neighbor; in fact, this may even be the last time he will still be considered a “supporting character.”

While The Defenders and the early parts of Jessica Jones’ second season saw him dutifully fulfilling his self-appointed role as her sidekick, we soon saw Malcolm’s own innate detective skills and sense of justice leading him away from Jessica. In his spare time, he replaced his drug habit with a long string of hook-ups, leading to a one-night stand with Trish (Rachael Taylor) that both seemed to regret in the end.

And though moving away from Jessica as a truly supporting player, his emerging B-Plot highlighted one of Jessica’s big faults – her inability to embrace people – while defining him as one of the best characters in the second season. Sadly, his success meant he had to leave Alias Investigations entirely for a rival P.I. firm and stealing away Jessica’s best client, Jeri Hogarth (Carrie Anne Moss). Hopefully, it will work out for Malcolm and, just maybe, he and Jessica will mend things before too long.

 


Zari Tomaz (Tala Ashe) | DC's Legends of Tomorrow 89%

DC's Legends of Tomorrow -- "Guest Starring John Noble" Pictured: Tala Ashe as Zari -- Photo: Dean Buscher/The CW

(Photo by )

When Ashe was first announced as a new permanent member of the Legends team, the character was said to be something of a foil for the established characters. But when she finally debuted, she quickly went from criticizing the ne’er-do-wells’ habit of making situations worse to munching on kettle corn while watching them do it. But considering she came from a 2042 in which A.R.G.U.S. turned the United States into an anti-metahuman police state in which food was scarce, it makes absolute sense she would abuse the Waverider’s food replicator and collection of video games.

Though haunted by the death of her brother in 2041 and stand-offish with the team for the first few months, Zari finally embraced them as friends after spending an incalculable amount of time inside a time-loop which reset with the Waverider exploding. While still sarcastic and occasionally emotionally distant, Zari accepted the ship as home, aiding the team in fashioning a Beebo doll powerful enough to stop the demon Mallus.

And even though the treat to her life from Mallus was over, she choose to remain with the Legends. We’re definitely glad she did.


Detective Brigid O’Reilly (Emma Lahana) | Cloak and Dagger 87%

MARVEL'S CLOAK & DAGGER - "Suicide Sprints" - EMMA LAHANA (Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani)

(Photo by Freeform/Alfonso Bresciani)

Making her presence felt in the second episode of Cloak & Dagger as an almost completely silent detective, O’Reilly quickly distinguished herself as an upstanding officer of the law. With a keen eye for detection — she knew almost instantly that Tandy Bowen’s (Olivia Holt) first stabbing was in self-defense — and a true sense of justice — she chaffed after being told she could not pursue Tandy’s case any further — she quickly became Tandy and Tyrone Johnson’s (Aubrey Joseph) only real support; in fact, she was more supportive of the two than they were of each other.

When neither the light-wielding Tandy nor the darkness-controlling Tyrone could turn to their parents, she became the go-to adult. But as viewers saw, her willingness to bend some laws for a greater good or even do a line of coke for pleasure and business suggests she is more than just a good cop, making her a rough balance of the Johnsons’ tendency toward precise order and Melissa Bowen’s (Andrea Roth) love affair with chaos. Created by Bill Mantlo in the first issue of Cloak & Dagger in 1985, O’Reilly was always a supporting character for the duo. Including after she died and became something else – a change in status seemingly teased in the closing moments of the show’s first season.


Morgan Jones (Lenny James) | The Walking Dead 80% and Fear the Walking Dead 75%

For some, The Walking Dead never quite worked because Morgan was missing for so long. Debuting in the first episode as a distraught man readying himself to shoot his zombified wife’s corpse, James made a staggering impression in what was his only appearance until a single episode in season 3. The character remained alive in the story via a walky-talky and Rick’s (Andrew Lincoln) constant attempts to give him some clue of where his group was headed.

But when the pair finally reunited in season 5, Morgan was a changed man. His journey to Alexandria was not an easy one, and it saw his strength collapse into profound grief over the loss of his family and a willingness to kill anyone who got in his way. Eventually, he met a man who helped him recover some of his humanity. After which, he choose to find Rick.

Despite learning a way of peace, events since joining Rick’s group have led him back to violence. Still suffering from PTSD, the control Morgan thought he had wavered in the face of the world Rick and other groups were building. Consequently, he began to kill again and later suffered hallucinations of some of his victims. When last seen, Morgan appeared ready to leave the group and heal.

Now, on Fear the Walking Dead, Morgan is maintaining his wish to be alone while healing, even if he’s coming to understand that isolation is just not practical. To those he encounters, he’s something of a soothsayer, but it may just be a matter of time before Morgan resumes the way of violence.


Kevin Keller (Casey Cott) | Riverdale 84%

Riverdale -- "Chapter Twenty-Seven: The Hills Have Eyes" -- Image Number: RVD214a_0028.jpg -- Pictured: Casey Cott as Kevin -- Photo: Dean Buscher/The CW

(Photo by Dean Buscher/The CW)

If there is one character on Riverdale who genuinely remains in the support category, it’s Kevin Keller. While presented as important part of the gang – he is Betty’s (Lili Reinhart) confidant – he is not one of the main four and often finds himself either aiding Betty or offering quippy commentary on the events of the week while passing through the halls of Riverdale High. Early in the second season, the Black Hood story line dovetailed with Kevin’s penchant for cruising, but it was dropped before anything truly meaningful could come of it, and that’s despite Kevin’s decision to come out to his father.

Nonetheless, Kevin is always around to back up the gang or literally set the stage with his production of Carrie: The Musical. And his continued presence as a supporting player may be rewarded in the third season as he and Josie (Ashleigh Murray) – another underutilized character – find themselves living under one roof when their parents decide they should become a family. Hopefully, it will lead to more of a presence for Kevin (and Josie) going forward.


Alphonso “Mack” Mackenzie (Henry Simmons) | Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. 95%

After all these years, it is difficult to remember a time when Mack was an agent of a rival version of S.H.I.E.L.D., looking to steal Nick Fury’s Toolbox from Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg). But as the show looked back on itself during season 5, Mack’s original status on the show underscores where he is now – the resident healthy skeptic. Even after traveling through time, experiencing another life in a computer and becoming possessed by the Spirit of Vengeance, Mack is always the first to call shenanigans on any new ridiculous threat or tech the team encounters.

But even as a plant, Mack endeared himself quickly by becoming Fitz’s (Iain De Caestecker) interpreter while he recovered from brain trauma and an indispensable part of Coulson’s core team when the two S.H.I.E.L.D.s merged late in the second season. Not that it’s been easy for him. He’s tried to quit multiple times and always ends up with more responsibilities as a consequence. He also carries the memory of a child he lost in real life and in that computer simulation, and his relationship with Yo-Yo (Natalia Cordova-Buckley) has hit one of its roughest patches going into the sixth season. Through it all, Mack perseveres, though. Sometimes thanks to his faith — he’s also the only truly religious member of the team — and sometimes because he’s the guy holding the shotgun-axe.


Jennifer Pierce (China Anne McClain) | Black Lightning 92%

Though Black Lightning is still a young series – its first season ran 13 episodes – it worked hard to get to places some of its CW brethren would reach far later in their runs. Consequently, the show opens with a team practically assembled already – the Pierce family; in fact, a threat to the family forces Jefferson (Cress Williams) into taking up his Black Lightning identity again.

But in the subsequent weeks, younger daughter Jennifer distinguished herself as a character to watch. While headstrong, she is not necessarily bratty. And in those times when her antics are the legitimate actions of a brat, she always finds a way to square things with Jefferson, her mother Lynn (Christine Adams) or older sister Anissa (Nafessa Williams). Despite being the odd one out in the family, the bond she felt for them was strong and always workable. And that’s before the onset of her powers.

Once her abilities emerged, and her family learned about them, Jennifer became one of the most intriguing characters on the show because she did not want them. Finally revealing that she wants “a normal life,” she took a key step toward maturity and defining who she will be even as it seems she has embraced her powers.


Mariah Dillard (Alfre Woodard) | Marvel’s Luke Cage

While much of the talk about Luke Cage’s second season centered on new villain John McIver — aka Bushmaster (Mustafa Shakir) — the show-stealing Mariah Dillard elevated the program in unexpected ways; for one, Bushmaster’s real conflict was with the former councilwoman and criminal mastermind. Luke (Mike Colter) just kept pushing his way into the crossfire. The character’s attempts to go legitimate underscored the legacy of her grandmother and the ugly truth about her daughter Tilda Johnson (Gabrielle Dennis), revealing the real theme of the season while also giving Mariah a layered relationship with Shades (Theo Rossi). As Bushmaster unraveled Mariah’s schemes and pushed her closer and closer to the Stokes legacy, so too did Mariah’s ability to maintain her composure and lie convincingly to those closest to her.

Add a legitimately award-worthy performance by Woodard and you get a stunningly complex look at a woman on the brink of getting everything she wanted, but failing to get it or the peace she was really looking to find. Even in her final acts, she chose to be vindictive instead of resolving her remaining grief with Luke or Tilda.

June has the perfect variety of action, thriller, drama, and comedy to satisfy anyone’s early summer binging palette. From GLOW to Preacher to The Affair and more, learn more about what you should be watching this month below.


Humans 94% (AMC)

What it is: Based on the original Swedish series, Real Humans, Sam Vincent and Jonathan Brackley’s English-language adaptation takes place in a near-future where artificial intelligence exists in the form of humanoid servants called Synths. Of course, such miraculous technological developments come with larger social and political consequences. Who’s really the one in power? 

Why you should watch it: Like film Ex Machina, HBO’s Westworld, and other prestige A.I. outings, Humans is a sci-fi psychological thriller for the thinking viewer. Top-notch performances and enticing plot twists will keep you glued to the screen. After over a year since the March 2017 finale of season 2, it finally returns with season 3 on June 5.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 12 hours


Sense8 86% (Netflix)

What it is: This sci-fi adventure series from the minds that brought you The Matrix follows eight strangers from around the world who are inexplicably linked mentally and emotionally as “sensates.”

Why you should watch it: While the series is inherently escapist entertainment, there’s a pronounced depth to the social themes it explores across politics, identity, religion, race, sexuality, and more, and much of its adventure can ultimately be seen as allegorical to real-world issues today. While it wrapped after season 2, Netflix is bringing it back by popular demand for one finale two-hour feature finale on June 8. So grab the popcorn and get to binging!

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 23 hours


Claws (TNT)

What it is: Niecy Nash stars as Desna Simms, the takes-no-prisoners owner of Nail Artisans, a nail salon in the swampy town of Manatee County, Florida. She’s flanked by a scene-stealing assortment of  coworkers and patrons. The drama flares, however, when the employees of Nail Artisans turn to organized crime and start laundering money.

Why you should watch it:  Full of camp, high-stakes crime drama, and whip-smart, hilarious scripts with performances to match, Claws may be the most fun you’ll have with a TV series this summer. Plus we’ll take any excuse to see two-time Emmy nominee Nash execute her perfect blend of humor and heart. Season 2 premieres June 10.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 7.5 hours


Goliath 86% (Amazon)

What it is: Billy Bob Thornton is a pro at playing down-and-out, so you’re seeing a master at work when you see him put his spin on the trope in Goliath. He stars as Billy McBride, a disgraced lawyer who’s expelled from his firm. Now an ambulance chaser, he gets his shot with a new case to enact revenge on those who took him down to begin with.

Why you should watch it: Goliath creator David E. Kelley — Big Little Lies, Boston Legal, The Practice, Ally McBeal, Chicago Hope — has been attached to some of the best television series of the last few decades. Throw in Oscar-winner Billy Bob Thorton (who also won a Golden Globe for his performance here), and the result is must-watch TV.

Where to watch it: Amazon

Commitment: Approx. 8 hours


The Affair 86% (Showtime)

Ruth Wilson as Alison and Dominic West as Noah in The Affair (season 2, episode 1). (Mark Schafer/SHOWTIME)

What it is: As the old adage goes, love is a battlefield, and with The Affair, we’re here to witness some emotional warfare. The titular indiscretion comes about when Alison and Noah meet on Long Island, consummate their desires, and in turn destroy their respective marriages to Cole and Helen, respectively. The Affair is told through the four main players’ rotating perspectives.

Why you should watch it: We know the Golden Globes love to honor a rookie series, but it’s not for nothing that The Affair swept them after its first season by winning best drama series and best lead actress for Ruth Wilson. Maura Tierney then went on to win for her supporting turn the following year. Dense and emotionally trying as it may be, these are all characters that you’ll fall in love with and feel for as the dissipation of their happiness and potential reconciliation plays out each week. Season 4 premieres June 17.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 32 hours


Marvel's Luke Cage 87% (Netflix)

What it is: While we first met Luke Cage on the streets of Hell’s Kitchen in Jessica Jones, when it came to debuting his own namesake series, Netflix brought our super-strengthed hero up to Harlem, where he’s attempting to rebuild a life after the experiment that gave him his strength in the first place went awry.

Why you should watch it: Luke Cage may have been followed by a billion-dollar blockbuster film straight out of Wakanda, but that doesn’t diminish the power of seeing a black Marvel superhero on the small streaming screen. It helps, too, that it’s an excellent series full of fine performances and industry heavy-hitters like Mahershala Ali, Alfre Woodard, Rosario Dawson, and Mike Colter as the titular hero. Season 2 premieres June 22.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours


Preacher 87% (AMC)

Dominic Cooper, Ruth Negga in Preacher (Skip Bolen/AMC)

What it is: Sam Catlin, Evan Goldberg, and Seth Rogen team up here behind the camera to adapt Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon’s cult comic book about a preacher, Jesse Custer (Dominic Cooper), on a violently allegorical quest to “find God” — plus vampires, exploding holy men, extraterrestrial entities, and gun-slinging exes (played by Ruth Negga, no less).

Why you should watch it: If that soundbite wasn’t at least enticing, this series is probably not for you. But if your interest is piqued, Preacher is sheer perfection. Unapologetically bloody, brazen, and bad to the bone, this series comes at the height of peak genre TV and runs with the best of them. Season 3 premieres on June 24.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 17 hours


GLOW 92% (Netflix)

What it is: From creators Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch, GLOW (taken from the real-life ’80s entertainment series, Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling), follows a group of down-and-out actresses who unwittingly find themselves cast in a televised women’s wrestling league. Following both their personal and professional lives, it centers on Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie), Debbie Eagan (Betty Gilpin), and the man who runs the league, Sam Sylvia (Marc Maron).

Why you should watch it: On paper, GLOW sounds like the kind of series that’s just so crazy it might work. Then again, it is from producer Jenji Kohan (Weeds, Orange Is the New Black). Utterly unique in the world of the half-hour dramedy, this standout series is lead by a stellar cast of kickass ladies (and even more behind the camera). Season 2 premieres in full June 29.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours


Power 81% (Starz)

What it is: From creator Courtney Kemp Agboh and starring Omari Hardwick as main anti-hero James St. Patrick, Power charts James’ life as he runs a popular nightclub in New York City while moonlighting as an underground drug kingpin. How he keeps it all together while leading a double-life is just the tip of the iceberg of this series’ juicy drama.

Why you should watch it: Over the course of its four seasons, this gritty crime drama has succeeded with a powerful ensemble cast providing compelling and gloriously soapy performances  in pursuit of its titular vice. Season 5 premieres July 1.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, Hulu, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 38 hours

This week on home video, we’ve got a superhero blockbuster, a horror sequel, an oddball dramedy, one of the best-reviewed horror films of the year, a ton of television, and more. Read on for the full list.


The Wailing (2016) 99%

This South Korean horror drama centers on a small town reeling from a series of brutal murders after the arrival of a mysterious stranger. The only extras include standard behind-the-scenes and making-of featurettes.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


Penny Dreadful: Season 3 (2016) 93%

Eva Green, Timothy Dalton, and Josh Hartnett star in Showtime’s popular gothic horror drama, which places classic literary characters like Victor Frankenstein, Dorian Gray, and Dracula in late 19th century London.  The final season set comes with character profiles for all the major players and inside looks at Dr. Jekyll’s lab and the prosthetics and costumes used in the show, plus more.

Get it Here


Vikings: Season 4 (2016) 92%

Based on the legends of Viking Ragnar Lothbrok, this History Channel original drama focuses on his rise from farmer to warrior, and from raider of England and France to King of the Vikings. This release of the first half of season four includes a pair of featurettes, an interactive piece, and extended episodes.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


Preacher: Season 1 (2016) 89%

Based on the comic book of the same name, this AMC drama centers on a possessed Texas minister who teams up with his ex and a vampire to unravel a mystery involving spirits from another world. The season one set comes with deleted and extended scenes, a gag reel, a look at the filming of the pilot episode, a profile of the stunt work, and more.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


Into the Forest (2015) 76%

Evan Rachel Wood and Ellen Page star in this thriller about a pair of sisters attempting to survive an apocalyptic power outage by retreating into the woods surrounding their home. Included are an audio commentary with writer/director Patricia Rozema and a making-of featurette.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


Swiss Army Man (2016) 72%

Paul Dano and Daniel Radcliffe star in this offbeat dramedy about a shipwrecked man who discovers a gassy all-purpose corpse who might be his ticket back to civilization. Extras include a commentary track, a behind-the-scenes featurette, a look at the design of the corpse dummy, deleted scenes, and a Q&A with the filmmakers.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


American Horror Story: Hotel (2015) 64%

AHS‘s fifth season takes place inside an old haunted hotel, inhabited by vampires, ghosts, and murderers, as well as the unsuspecting victims of a serial killer. Special features include an inside look at the Hotel Cortez and the “Devil’s Night” episode.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


The Purge: Election Year (2016) 56%

This third installment in the Purge franchise takes a more political turn, focusing on a presidential candidate who vows to do away with the Purge and the shadowy government forces threatening her life as a result. Extras include a character spotlight on Frank Grillo returning as Leo Barnes, deleted scenes, and an inside look at the franchise.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


X-Men: Apocalypse (2016) 47%

Jennifer Lawrence, Michael Fassbender, and Oscar Isaac lead an ensemble cast in this latest installment of the X-Men series, which finds the titular heroes doing battle with a centuries-old mutant who seeks to destroy humanity and remake the world. Bonus features include a commentary track with director Bryan Singer and writer Simon Kinberg, deleted and extended scenes, a gag reel, an hourlong documentary, and more. We also have some new interviews with the cast, as well as a look behind the scenes at Dr. Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters, which you can see here.

Get it Here, Stream it Here


The Venture Bros.: Season 6 (2015) 100%

Season six of this Adult Swim comedy finds Dr. Venture, Hank, Dean, and Brock moving to New York, where they run into trouble with one of their new neighbors, while the Monarch discovers an unwelcome secret about his past. The season six set comes with commentary tracks for every episode, deleted scenes, and a 45-minute bonus special.

Get it Here

Preacher1

A brush-strewn, beige stretch of New Mexico desert surrounds Preacher‘s set, a place removed enough from nearby Albuquerque to deter any would-be crashers, and desolate enough to double for the drama’s fictional West Texas town of Annville. It is upon these rocks that the show’s church, All Saints’ Congregational, is built. Inside, it’s empty and cool, a place for crew members and extras to enjoy a respite from the unrelenting sun and dry atmosphere.

Last month, AMC invited a select group of journalists on set to interview stars Dominic Cooper, Ruth Negga, and Joseph Gilgun about the upcoming drama, a project based on a popular comic book series that debuted in 1995 and was trapped in development purgatory for nearly two decades.

Debuting Sunday, May 22 at 10 pm (before it moves to its regular 9 pm timeslot on Sunday, June 5), Preacher has the potential to be cable’s next great action franchise. First, though, it has to pass muster with viewers. Based on everything we saw on location and heard from the show’s stars and producers during several recent interviews, here are five reasons we can have faith in AMC’s Preacher.


IT’S NOT A CONVENTIONAL COMIC BOOK STORY

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Good news for anyone who feels oversaturated with masked heroes: Preacher has none of these elements. On the other hand, if you’re a religious person, avert thine eyes – the comic book title upon which the series is based happens to be riddled with unapologetic blasphemy. When we first meet the show’s titular hero, Jesse Custer (Dominic Cooper), he’s a bumbling pastor presiding over a tiny flock that barely respects him. In one of the pilot’s funnier running jokes, someone keeps altering the inspirational quotes on the sign outside of the church into crass one-liners.

Jesse’s town, Annville, is small enough that everyone knows each other, so there’s plenty of gossip about their preacher’s dark past. Part of that unsavory history comes back to haunt him in the form of his scorned and scornful ex-girlfriend Tulip (Ruth Negga). But he also crosses paths with an Irish stranger named Cassidy (Joseph Gilgun), who is as easygoing, happy, and faithless as Jesse is sullen.

That is, until one night when a mysterious force jumps into Jesse’s body. Soon after, the preacher discovers that he can exert influence over any being that hears his words, although at first he struggles to harness that power.

“He’s desperate to be good; he’s desperate to help these people. It’s all from a genuine good place,” Cooper said. “But we often can’t hide the true monster that’s kind of just lying underneath the skin.”

Somewhere along the line, Preacher may transform into a journey. The first issues of the comic take the main characters on a road trip to cities around the United States and to Heaven – a cumbersome and potentially pricey proposition for any new series.

As such, the pilot refrains from being overly loyal to the plot structure established on the page. Most of season one’s action stays put in Annville.

“We end where the comic starts,” Cooper explained. “And that’s so necessary… You need to get to know characters. The shows that are flawed and haven’t continued are when, no matter how good they’ve been, there’s a chaos of people who we can’t, as an audience, get to know or understand and therefore care about.

“What we have done is established the roots of these people,” he continued.  “I’m sure we’ll end up in some [season], down the road, in Hell somewhere or maybe in Heaven. It will become more and more extraordinary. But I think it has to be embedded in something, at the moment, that people can grasp.”


THE CASTING IS PERFECT

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A certain faction of every comic title’s fanbase will inevitably take issue with deviations from the original story. It’s usually a small subset but, as witnessed in the social media protests over John Boyega being cast as a black Stormtrooper in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, it can be loud and ignorant. As such, one can expect a few of these purists to find fault in the casting of Negga, an Ethiopian-Irish actress playing Tulip, a hard-boiled Texas woman drawn as a Caucasian blonde in the comics. Those complaints are not only born of ignorance but a failure to appreciate the electricity that Negga brings to the role. She’s a perfect match for Cooper’s tormented hero, and she holds her own with Gilgun’s delightfully anarchic Cassidy at every turn.

“The great thing that’s happening now is that comic books and action movies are leading the way, at the moment, in terms of diversifying the characters,” Negga said in an exclusive interview conducted earlier this year. “We need to see a world that reflects that. It doesn’t make sense not to, you know that I mean?”

And in response to anyone who has a problem with her playing Tulip: “F–k them. It’s the march of time, moving forward. It’s late enough that it’s happened. And I just don’t have any time for that nonsense.”


IT’S A VIOLENT ACTION SERIES WITH AN INTELLECTUAL SOUL

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Bursting with hyper-kinetic fight choreography and drowning in blood, Preacher appears to be actively competing for the title of TV’s Goriest Show. Considering it airs on the same network as The Walking Dead, that’s saying something. Although the average AMC viewer likely has a strong stomach for flesh being ripped from bone and arcs of arterial spray, some may be thrown by the premiere’s lighthearted treatment of gore and campy barbarity.

Negga, though, isn’t concerned. “I can’t bear blood and gore and violence,” she said during the set visit. “But when I watched the pilot and some of the fight scenes, it’s just so beautifully choreographed, and there’s an edge of humor there that takes it out of the real world. I never feel uncomfortable with it, because it’s really tongue-in-cheek.”

Underneath all of that simmers an ongoing debate about whether an interventionist deity is watching over us, and whether it makes sense to lean on that idea for strength and comfort.

“I think you are on very dangerous ground when you do start to have an opinion about religion in what is essentially a very religious country,” Cooper said. “What [the show] does bring up is that anyone’s interpretation of this God is acceptable and fair, no matter how you perceive it or what your idea of it is. It’s up to you.”


IT’S MADE BY SUPER FANS

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News of a popular comic being adapted into a film often elicits a mixture of elation and dread in passionate fans. What are comics and graphic novels, after all, if not story boards for amazing films? That’s part of the reason they’re appealing as film subjects: they have built in audiences already, and the mythologies and set and costume designs are more or less established.

Even so, there are many more disappointing comic book movies and TV series than there are great ones. Preacher’s executive producers, Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, and showrunner Sam Catlin know this. Rogen and Goldberg also co-directed the pilot, and stressed that they were huge fans of the source material above all else, which makes all the difference.

“I love every element of the comic book. I don’t want to lose anything. And when things get lost, I get scared about it,” Rogen told a group of critics at a press conference held in January. “The show is being created by people who have both loved it for years and years and years and years… I don’t want to ruin my favorite comic!”

He’s not the only one who’s concerned. “I don’t want to let the fans down. That’s just terrifying,” Gilgun said during the set visit. “In fact, that frightens me more than the idea of letting Evan and Sam down… because they’ve invested so much time into this s–t. I know what it’s like to be a fan of something. We all know. And how loyal you are… and that it means a lot to people.”

That level of concern and quavering fear resulted in a pilot that’s gory, insightful, violent, hilarious, haunting, and inspiring in equal measure. And it demonstrates the difference between watching a comic book story awkwardly jammed into a series construct by TV producers, and true aficionados using the open-ended nature of television to do justice to a complex tale.


THE TIMING IS RIGHT

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There’s a reason a number of well-known directors and producers — including Sam Mendes, Kevin Smith, Mark Steven Johnson, and Howard Deutsch — have attempted to bring Preacher to life as a film or series, only to drop the project. Even HBO attached itself at one point, before letting it go. Preacher’s central story is guaranteed to ruffle a few feathers. But as conservative and religious as American culture can be, the average entertainment consumer’s sensibility has calloused up a bit since Ennis and Dillon first introduced readers to Jesse, Tulip and Cassidy.

The inked work came of age during the era when Quentin Tarantino made highly stylized extreme violence fashionable in cinema, spawning dozens of bullet-riddled crime films that made viewers root for dark anti-heroes.

That same era saw the rise of DC Comics’ Vertigo imprint, home to Preacher and other titles (including Lucifer, now a Fox series ) considered edgier and more adult-themed than adherents to Comics Code Authority guidelines – rules set up to allow publishers such as DC to self-regulate content in their titles — would allow.

Back then, Preacher made waves by skewering the common ideas surrounding blind faith and religiosity, and Ennis relished in weaving blasphemous content throughout the 66-issue main story.

Jump forward two decades: The CCA is kaput. Tarantino is a mainstream auteur director. And one of the most popular titles on television is AMC’s The Walking Dead — a series that, at one point, showed its heroes brutally butchering of a group of cannibals in a church.

It makes perfect sense, then, that AMC also serves as Preacher’s Earthly home.

“If we have one mantra,” Rogen said, “it’s make something that is a good TV show, first and foremost, and something that if you are a fan of the comic, you love and truly don’t know what to expect at the same time.”


Preacher premieres this Sunday, May 22 at 10 p.m. on AMC; read reviews here.

Melanie McFarland is a Seattle-based TV critic and an executive member of the Television Critics Association. Follow her on Twitter: @McTelevision

This week at the movies, we’ve got furious fowl (The Angry Birds Movie, featuring voice performances by Jason Sudeikis and Josh Gad), a neighborhood feud (Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, starring Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne), and mismatched detectives (The Nice Guys, starring Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling). What do the critics have to say?


The Angry Birds Movie (2016) 43%

First the good news: at press time, The Angry Birds Movie is the best-reviewed video game film adaptation of all time. The bad news is that it’s still Rotten on the Tomatometer. It’s the story of Red (voiced by Jason Sudeikis), an oft-enraged bird who fears that a group of pigs want to invade his avian paradise. Critics say The Angry Birds Movie has a colorful look and a few decent gags, but it wastes a stellar voice cast on a script filled with lowbrow humor and mixed messages.


Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising (2016) 64%

Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne squared off against an obnoxious fraternity in 2014’s Neighborsand the result was a Certified Fresh hit comedy. This time around, Mac (Rogen) and Kelly (Byrne) face a similar predicament when a sorority led by party girl Shelby (Chloë Grace Moretz) moves in next door, so they reunite with frat boy Teddy (Zac Efron) to fight fire with fire. Critics say Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising manages to squeeze enough fresh laughs out of its recycled premise to make it worth a watch, even if it doesn’t feel like a particularly necessary sequel.


The Nice Guys (2016) 91%

Shane Black may not have invented the odd couple action/comedy, but he’s one of its greatest purveyors – he wrote the script for Lethal Weapon and directed Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang. Now he’s back with The Nice Guys, and critics say this wild and woolly comedy – about a private eye who teams up with an enforcer to find a missing woman – boasts terrific comic chemistry between Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling, along with a surfeit of groovy 1970s style.


What’s Hot on TV

Lady Dynamite: Season 1 (2016) 95%

Maria Bamford‘s Lady Dynamite is a vibrant, subversive, sweet, meta-fictional ride – but also a courageous, boundary-busting and ultimately deep portrayal of a troubled psyche.


 

Preacher: Season 1 (2016) 89%

A thrilling celebration of the bizarre, Preacher boasts enough gore, glee, and guile to make this visually stunning adaption a must-see for fans of the comic and newcomers alike.


Chelsea: Season 1 (2016) 41%

Chelsea comes up short in its attempts to innovate the conventional talk show format — and even worse, it frequently fails to be smart or funny.


Also Opening This Week In Limited Release

  • Crocodile Gennadiy (2015) , a documentary about a Ukrainian preacher who made it a personal mission to save local kids from addiction, is at 100 percent.
  • Margarita, With a Straw (2014) , starring Kalki Koechlin in a drama about a woman struggling with both cerebral palsy and matters of the heart, is at 90 percent.
  • Weiner (2016) , a documentary about the failed mayoral candidate and serial sexter, is at 87 percent.
  • Maggie's Plan (2015) , starring Greta Gerwig and Ethan Hawke in a comedy about a woman who wants a baby without the responsibilities of marriage, is at 79 percent.
  • Manhattan Night (2016) , starring Adrien Brody in a noirish thriller about a newspaper columnist who’s tasked by a mysterious woman to solve her husband’s murder, is at 50 percent.
  • Ma ma (2015) , starring Penelope Cruz in a drama about a cancer-stricken woman who develops a relationship with a recent widower, is at 10 percent.

A possessed minister teams up with his ex and a hard-drinking Irish vampire in search of answers in this drama adaptation of the Garth Ennis/Steve Dillon comic book series of the same name. Hit play to watch the official trailer for AMC’s Preacher.


summer prem collage

While not as chock full of premieres as the fall TV season, summer can churn out some doozies of its own. Like we did around this time last year, we’ll be treated to shows that draw immediate engagement (Mr. Robot, Penny Dreadful, Orange is the New Black, Wayward Pines), television movie premieres (Sharknado: The 4th Awakens, The Dresser, All The Way), and special events (Just Let Go – Lenny Kravitz Live, Every Brilliant Thing, SyFy Presents Live from Comic-Con). Add some anticipated series premieres (Roadies, Lady Dynamite, Outcast, Preacher) and miniseries (Roots, Houdini & Doyle, O.J.: Made in America) to the mix, and your DVR hard drives are sure to reach max capacity. So the questions is, which shows will you be deleting first, and which will rise to the pinnacle of your summer viewing list of faves? Check out the full (ever growing) list here:


 

May | June | July | August | TBA 


 May

Sunday, May 1
Penny Dreadful season three premiere, 10 p.m., Showtime

Monday, May 2
Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah television movie premiere, HBO
Houdini & Doyle miniseries premiere, 9 p.m., FOX

Tuesday, May 3
Person of Interest season five premiere, 10 p.m., CBS

Wednesday, May 4
Maron season four premiere, 9 p.m., IFC

Thursday, May 5
Flowers series premiere (US), Seeso
Marseille series premiere, Netflix

Grace and Frankie

Grace and Frankie

Friday, May 6
Grace and Frankie season two premiere, Netflix

Sunday, May 8
Wallander season four premiere, 9 p.m., PBS

Monday, May 9
Every Brilliant Thing special event premiere, HBO

Tuesday, May 10
First Impressions series premiere, 10:30 p.m., USA

Wednesday, May 11
Chelsea series premiere, Netflix

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Submission

Thursday, May 12
Submission series premiere, 11 p.m., Showtime

Friday, May 13
Just Let Go –  Lenny Kravitz Live special event premiere, 8 p.m., Showtime

Wednesday, May 18
Royal Pains season eight premiere, 10 p.m., USA

Friday, May 20
Doctor Thorne series premiere (US), Amazon
Lady Dynamite series premiere, Netflix
Masters of Illusion season three premiere, 8 p.m., CW

Saturday, May 21
All the Way television movie premiere, 8 p.m., HBO

Dominic Cooper as Jesse Custer; Preacher _ Season 1, Gallery - Photo Credit: Lewis Jacobs/AMC

Preacher

Sunday, May 22
Preacher series premiere, 10 p.m., AMC

Monday, May 23
Whose Line is it Anyway? season 12 premiere, 9 p.m., CW

Wednesday, May 25
Wayward Pines season two premiere, 9 p.m., FOX

Friday, May 27
Bloodline season two premiere, Netflix
The Do-Over television movie premiere, Netflix

roots

Roots

Monday, May 30
So You Think You Can Dance season 13 premiere, 8 p.m., FOX
The Dresser television movie premiere (US), 9 p.m., Starz
Roots miniseries premiere, 9 p.m., History, Lifetime, and A&E
Mistresses season four premiere, 10 p.m., ABC

Tuesday, May 31
Peaky Blinders season three premiere, Netflix
Powers season two premiere, Playstation Network
Maya and Marty series premiere, 10 p.m., NBC
Scream season two premiere, 10 p.m., MTV

 

Back to Top


 June


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The Night Shift

Wednesday, June 1
Rock this Boat: New Kids on the Block season two premiere, 8 p.m., POP
Young & Hungry season four premiere, 8 p.m., Freeform
Baby Daddy season five return, 8:30 p.m., Freeform
Kingdom season two return, 9 p.m., DirecTV
Cleverman series premiere, 10 p.m., Sundance
The Night Shift season three premiere, 10 p.m., NBC

Thursday, June 2
Hibana: Spark series premiere, Netflix
Beauty and the Beast season four premiere, 9 p.m., CW
Quincy Jones: Burning the Light television movie premiere, 10 p.m., HBO

outcast

Outcast

Friday, June 3
Comedy Bang! Bang! season five premiere, 11 p.m., IFC
Outcast series premiere, Cinemax

Sunday, June 5
Feed the Beast series premiere, 10 p.m., AMC

Monday, June 6
Angie Tribeca season two premiere, TBS
Barbarians Rising miniseries premiere, 9 p.m., History
Devious Maids season four premiere, 9 p.m., Lifetime
Rizzoli & Isles season seven premiere, 9 p.m., TNT
UnREAL season two premiere, 10 p.m., Lifetime

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Casual

Tuesday, June 7
Casual season two premiere, Hulu

Friday, June 10
Voltron: Legendary Defender series premiere, Netflix

Saturday, June 11
Hell on Wheels season five return 9 p.m., AMC
O.J.: Made in America miniseries premiere, 9 p.m., ABC
The American West miniseries premiere 10 p.m., AMC

Sunday, June 12
Difficult People season two premiere, Hulu
Ride with Norman Reedus series premiere, 10 p.m., AMC

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Guilt

Monday, June 13
Guilt series premiere, 9 p.m., Freeform
BrainDead series premiere, 10 p.m., CBS
Major Crimes season five premiere, 10 p.m., TNT

Tuesday, June 14
Animal Kingdom series premiere, 9 p.m., TNT
Uncle Buck series premiere, 9 p.m., ABC
Wrecked series premiere, 10 p.m., TBS

Thursday, June 16
Aquarius season two premiere, 9 p.m., NBC

Friday, June 17
Orange is the New Black season four premiere, Netflix

Saturday, June 18
Mother, May I Sleep with Danger television movie premiere, 8 p.m., Lifetime

jim gaff

The Jim Gaffigan Show

Sunday, June 19
Endeavour season three premiere (US), 9 p.m., PBS
The Last Ship season three premiere, 9 p.m., TNT
The Jim Gaffigan Show season two premiere, 10 p.m., TV Land
The Tunnel series premiere (US), 10:30 p.m., PBS

Monday, June 20
The Fosters 
season four premiere, 8 p.m., Freeform
Odd Mom Out 
season two premiere, 10 p.m., Bravo

Tuesday, June 21
Pretty Little Liars 
season seven premiere, 8 p.m., Freeform

Wednesday, June 22
Big Brother 
season 17 premiere, 8 p.m., CBS
American Gothic 
series premiere, 10 p.m., CBS

Thursday, June 23
Queen of the South series premiere, 10 p.m., USA
Thirteen 
series premiere, 10 p.m., BBC America

Friday, June 24
The Fundamentals of Caring
television movie premiere, Netflix

Saturday, June 25
Center Stage: On Pointe 
television movie premiere, 8 p.m., Lifetime

ROADIES

Roadies

Sunday, June 26
Dancing on the Edge series premiere (US), 8 p.m., PBS
Ray Donovan season four premiere, 9 p.m., Showtime
Murder in the First season three premiere, 10 p.m., TNT
Roadies series premiere, 10 p.m., Showtime

Tuesday, June 28
Dead of Summer series premiere, 9 p.m., Freeform
Zoo season two premiere, 9 p.m., CBS

Thursday, June 30
Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll season two premiere, 10 p.m., FX

 

Back to Top


 July


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Dark Matter

Friday, July 1
Between season two premiere, Netflix
Marcella series premiere (US), Netflix
Marco Polo season two premiere, Netflix
Killjoys season two premiere, 9 p.m., SyFy
Dark Matter season two premiere, 10 p.m., SyFy

Sunday, July 3
The Hunt series premiere (US), 9 p.m., BBC America

Wednesday, July 6
Duck Dynasty season nine premiere, 9 p.m., A&E
Tyrant season three premiere, 10 p.m., FX
Wahlburgers season five premiere, 10 p.m., A&E

Sunday, July 10
The Circus: Inside the Greatest Political Show on Earth season one return, 8 p.m., Showtime
DB Cooper miniseries premiere, 9 p.m., History
The Night Of series premiere, 9 p.m., HBO

Monday, July 11
Making of the Mob season two premiere, 10 p.m., AMC

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Mr. Robot

Wednesday, July 13
Penn & Teller: Fool Us season three premiere, 8 p.m., CW
Suits season six premiere, 9 p.m., USA
The A Word series premiere, 10 p.m., Sundance
Mr. Robot 
season two premiere, 10 p.m., USA

Friday, July 15
East Los High season four premiere, Hulu
Stranger Things series premiere, Netflix
Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru television movie premiere, Netflix

Sunday, July 17
Power season three premiere, 9 p.m., Starz
Ballers season two premiere, 10 p.m., HBO
Vice Principals series premiere, 10:30 p.m., HBO

Thursday, July 21
SyFy Presents Live from Comic-Con special event premiere, 8 p.m., SyFy

Friday, July 22
Bring It! season three return, 9 p.m., Lifetime

Saturday, July 23
Looking: The Movie television movie premiere, 10 p.m., HBO

Sunday, July 24
Ozzy and Jack’s World Detour series premiere, 10 p.m., History
Survivor’s Remorse season three premiere, 10 p.m., Starz

Tuesday, July 26
MadTV series premiere, 9 p.m., CW
Born This Way, season two premiere, 10 p.m., A&E

Thursday, July 28
Ripper Street season four premiere (US), 10 p.m., BBC America

Friday, July 29
Home: The Adventures of Tip and Oh series premiere, Netflix

Sunday, July 31
Sharknado: The 4th Awakens television movie premiere, 8 p.m., SyFy

 

Back to Top


 August


get down

The Get Down

Friday, Aug. 12
The Get Down series premiere, Netflix

Thursday, Aug. 18
60 Days In season two premiere, 9 p.m., A&E

Sunday, Aug. 21
Fear the Walking Dead season two return, 9 p.m.,  AMC

Tuesday, Aug. 23
Halt and Catch Fire season three premiere, 9 p.m., AMC
Better Late than Never series premiere, 10 p.m., NBC

Wednesday, Aug. 24
Gomorrah series premiere (US), 10 p.m., Sundance

Sunday, Aug. 28
The Strain season three premiere, 10 p.m., FX

Wednesday, Aug. 31
You’re the Worst season three premiere, 10 p.m., FX

Back to Top


TBA


Frontier series premiere, Netflix
Halt and Catch Fire season three premiere, AMC
Happy Valley season two premiere, Netflix
Masters of Sex season four premiere, Showtime (July)
Suits season six premiere, USA

Back to Top

This week in TV news, Sharknado 4 makes cast announcements, Game of Thrones breaks another record, we get a first look at Preacher, and more!


ANNA PAQUIN & WILMER VALDERRAMA ARE COMING TO A TELEVISION SCREEN NEAR YOU

Anna Paquin Wilmer Valderrama
One of the juiciest shows on television, and one soon-to-be juicy drama have announced some big casting news this week.  Longtime favorite Grey’s Anatomy has snatched up Wilmer Valderrama for as a yet to be revealed role. All Shonda Rhimes is letting us know is Valderrama is playing Kyle Diaz, and has a multi-episode arc. Also, Executive Producer Reese Witherspoon and Bruna Papandrea have found the lead to their formerly untitled show Broken.  Anna Paquin will play Gemma, a cutthroat Dallas divorce attorney whose life begins to unravel in a myriad of ways. ABC’s new drama pilot will mark Paquin’s first return to a series regular since her turn as Sookie Stackhouse in HBO’s cult favorite True Blood.

GAME OF THRONES‘ SEASON 6 TRAILER BREAKS VIEWING RECORD IN 24 HOURS

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HBO’s Emmy Winning mega hit series Game of Thrones released its season 6 trailer on Tuesday, racking up over 30 million views within the first 24 hours. The two minute piece hints at the fates of all your favorite Westeros residents, including the maybe not-so permanently dead Jon Snow. The trailer received 8 million hits on YouTube and 22 million hits on the show’s Facebook page, breaking season 5’s previous record of 27 million hits in the first day. Game of Thrones Season 6 premiers on April 24th.

AMC RELEASES PREACHER FIRST LOOK CHARACTER PHOTOS

Dominic Cooper as Jesse Custer - Preacher _ Season 1, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Lewis Jacobs/AMC
AMC has released three first look character photos from the highly anticipated drama series Preacher. Slated to debut in May, the series is based on the cult comic book franchise of the same name.  Preacher is a supernatural, twisted, and darkly comedic drama that follows a West Texas preacher named Jesse Custer (Dominic Cooper), his badass ex-girlfriend Tulip (Ruth Negga), and an Irish vagabond named Cassidy (Joseph Gilgun) who are thrust into a crazy world populated by a cast of characters from Heaven, Hell and everywhere in between. Check out the other first look photos here, and see the Preacher trailer here.

SHARKNADO 4 HAS CAST GARY BUSEY AND CHERYL TIEGS (AND MORE)

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Shark slayer Ian Ziering will return with Tara Reid to the fourth installment of the Sharknado franchise — working title Sharknado 4 — set to premiere this July. The new SyFy Channel film will take place five years after the events in Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No!. Joining the cast will be Cheryl Tiegs as mother of Ziering’s Fin, and the one and only Gary Busey as father of Reid’s April. Also cast are Tommy Davidson, Imani Hakim, Cody Linley and Masiela Lusha. Anthony C. Ferrante will return to direct Thunder Levin’s screenplay.

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