Between long-running series giving their last bow and sophomore efforts from acclaimed freshmen half-hours, you have nothing to worry about: May will give you plenty to catch up on while social distancing.   


Billions 89% (Showtime)

What it is: Showtime’s Billions dramatizes the high-stakes world of Wall Street when Chuck Rhoades (Paul Giamatti), a U.S. attorney, sets his sights on bringing down hedge fund manager Bobby Axelrod (Homeland‘s Damian Lewis) for insider trading and other illegal proclivities. In other words, all this real-world talk about one-percenters is rejiggered for some A-grade entertainment with some of the best actors working today.

Why you should watch it: Giamatti has built a career on playing the everyman, and here, he’s fighting for him. The actor’s turn as the hard-hitting U.S. attorney would be reason alone to watch (scenes of surprise BDSM and all), but Billions also boasts a timely, engrossing premise and firecracker performances from Lewis, Maggie Siff, Condola Rashad, Asia Kate Dillon, and a bevy of other supporters that meet Giamatti mark for mark. Season 5 premieres May 3 on Showtime.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 48 hours (for the first four seasons)


RENO 911! 86% (Quibi)

What it is: The hapless and hopeless crew at the Reno, Nevada sheriff’s department are the befuddling subject of this mockumentary series as improv comedians at the top of their game run around the biggest little city in the world stopping crime in its tracks — to less than satisfactory results.

Why you should watch it: “Reno 911!” was one of the first of its mockumentary, workplace comedy kinds upon its Comedy Central premiere in 2003. Plus, it launched the comedy careers of by-this-point industry vets, including Niecy Nash, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Thomas Lennon, and Cedric Yarbrough. The season 7 reboot premieres May 4 on Quibi.

Where to watch: Amazon, Google Play, Microsoft

Commitment: Approx. 32 hours (for the first six seasons)


Dead to Me 89% (Netflix)

What it is: Christina Applegate stars as Jen with Linda Cardellini as Judy, two widows who bond in a group therapy session through their opposing outlooks on life (the former hardened and angry, the latter new-agey and optimistic). Things in their friendship take a turn, however, when it’s learned that Judy isn’t exactly who she says she is — and she might know something about Jen’s husband’s hit-and-run death.

Why you should watch it: From creator Liz Feldman and co-producers Will Ferrell, Adam McKay, and Jessica Elbaum, Dead to Me was the must-watch, pitch-black comedy of last summer and went on to earn industry vet Applegate a surprise (and well-deserved) Emmy nomination later that year. Plus, with 30-minute episodes, it’s a binge that goes down easy. Season 2 premieres May 8 on Netflix.

Where to watch:  Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours (for the first season)


Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt 96% (Netflix)

What it is: After Kimmy Schmidt (Ellie Kemper) is rescued from an underground bunker where she was being held captive by a brainwashing cult leader, she does what any young woman who wants to see the world would do: She moves to New York City! The Netflix comedy is from creators Robert Carlock and Tina Fey, and though it wrapped its acclaimed four-season run early last year, this interactive special is sure to pass the time while in quarantine. Think of it as Black Mirror: Bandersnatch, but funnier.

Why you should watch it: Kimmy, her new roommate Titus Andromedon (Tituss Burgess), her new boss Jacqueline (Jane Krakowski), and her landlady Lillian Kaushtupper (Carol Kane) are sure to put a little pep in your step (and for more reasons than the titular hero’s incessant optimism) through their New York misadventures (and misunderstandings). Catch up on the whole thing before the special, which sees our hero face off with her arch nemesis in lead-up to her wedding, drops May 12 on Netflix.

Where to watch: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 25 hours (for all four seasons)


The 100 93% (The CW)

What it is: Here’s another intelligent, original take on the post-nuclear apocalypse from Jason Rothenberg for the CW. Set 97 years after nuclear war wiped out humanity, the mere thousands remaining survived by escaping on an ark-like spaceship that remained within Earth’s orbit. The twisty caveat? The series’ title represents the 100 juvenile prisoners who, against their will, are forced out of the Ark and back to Earth to learn if it’s habitable. To their surprise, it turns out that some humans lived through the nuclear war from the century prior — and not all of them are ready to befriend the young visitors.

Why you should watch it: As is the case with much of the CW’s slate of programming, The 100 is led by an impressive ensemble of young, breakout actors who are made all the more impressive by their series’ meatier material. Plus with an air-tight, high-concept foundation, there’s a reason we’ve been coming back for six seasons and counting. Season 7, its final outing, premieres May 20 on the CW.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Netflix, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 60 hours (for the first six seasons)


Homecoming 79% (Amazon Prime)

What it is: Based on the original podcast of the same name and from creators Micah Bloomberg, Eli Horowitz, and Mr. Robot mastermind Sam Esmail, Homecoming stars Julia Roberts as Heidi, an employee at the titular government facility meant to transition soldiers back into daily life post-combat. Told partially through flashback memory, the action of the series picks up when the Department of Defense comes knocking, asking why she left.

Why you should watch it: Craftily told and featuring a behemoth performance from Roberts and If Beale Street Could Talk breakout Stephan James, Homecoming is for anyone who likes their conspiracy dramas served with a twist. Season 2, which stars James and Janelle Monáe, premieres May 22 on Amazon Prime.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours (for the first season)


Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. 95% (ABC)

What it is: S.H.I.E.L.D. is the kind of agency you want at your back. Led by fan-favorite Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg, who caused uproar upon his character’s death in 2012’s The Avengers), Marvel Comics’ fictional Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement, and Logistics Division fights the behind-the-scenes battles that the average human wouldn’t dare face (see: Project Centipede and more). It’s wild, it’s crazy, and it’s been a heck of a fun time for Marvel superfans going for seven seasons strong.

Why you should watch it: Sure, this puzzle piece within the Marvel Cinematic Universe maintains the franchise call-backs and tonally checks all the boxes of what we look for in a Marvel romp, but you don’t have to be a die-hard lover of Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, and company to fall for S.H.I.E.L.D.’s extraterrestrial adventures and the now-beloved ensemble of characters it has built throughout its 100-plus episodes. Season 7, it’s final installment, premieres May 27 on ABC.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Netflix, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 92 hours (for the first six seasons)


Ramy 96% (Hulu)

What it is: “Ramy” tells the story of a millennial Muslim trying to balance the expectations of his culture and family with his innate desires for something different.

Why you should watch it: This semi-autobiographical dramedy series from comedian Ramy Youssef (who took home a surprise Golden Globe award for his performance on the first season) is a coming-of-ager unlike any other. Drenched in the cultural and religious implications of a Muslim 20-something trying to find his way, it intelligently cuts to the heart of contemporary life in the city (including religion- and race-based prejudice) while still landing a joke. Season 2 premieres May 29 on Hulu.

Where to watch: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Hulu, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 5 hours (for the first season)

Thumbnail image: Hulu; Sergei Bachlakov/The CW; ABC/Matthias Clamer

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These 10 series are just the thing to bring you from winter to spring this March, whether you are craving wars between gods, unlikely romantic comedies, badly behaved rich folk, or the corrupt getting their due. Catch our monthly binge guide below.


American Gods 77% (Starz)

What it is: The gods are out to play — and out for blood — in this cult favorite series on Starz. Based on the fantasy novel of the same name by Neil Gaiman, American Gods follows recently released convict Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle), who’s employed by the mysterious Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) as a bodyguard. Diving into a world of dark magic and gods new and old, it is soon revealed that Mr. Wednesday is on a mission to unite the Old Gods against the rise of the New.

Why you should watch it: Few series are quite as engrossingly strange and ambitious as American Gods, and that’s what has us hooked. It’s a timely commentary on the world we live in today but set against the backdrop of a dark and lurid fantasy epic. Season 2 premieres March 10.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 8 hours


Catastrophe 98% (Amazon Prime)

What it is: Here’s a romantic comedy squarely for adults. Amazon’s very funny London-set Catastrophe shows what happens when a no-strings-attached week of sex between a visiting American businessman (Rob Delaney) and an Irish schoolteacher (Sharon Horgan) turns into an unexpected pregnancy, a move overseas, and a proposal. And that’s just in the first episode.

Why you should watch it: Co-creators and stars Horgan and Delaney perfectly blend comedy and heart in their utterly original spin on the classic sitcom. Plus, their airtight scripts full of rat-a-tat-tat dialogue are about as joyously quippy and naturalistic as they come. (Judging from the pair’s famous Twitter accounts, that comes as little surprise.) And did we mention the late, great Carrie Fisher co-stars? The fourth and final season premieres March 15.

Where to watch it: Amazon

Commitment: About 8.5 hours


The Good Fight 95% (CBS All Access)

What it is: Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) gets the leading lady treatment with CBS All Access’ hit spin-off of The Good Wife. Set one year after the events of that acclaimed series’ finale (and picking up on the morning of President Donald Trump’s inauguration), The Good Fight follows Lockhart after she’s forced out of her own firm and teams up with goddaughter Maia Rindell (Game of Thrones Rose Leslie) and The Good Wife‘s Lucca Quinn (Cush Jumbo).

Why you should watch it: Sure, if you loved The Good Wife, you’ll love The Good Fight — but believe it or not, Baranski is even more astounding here and finds exciting new shades to the beloved Diane Lockhart. Season 3 premieres March 14.

Where to watch it: Amazon, CBS All Access, FandangoNow, Google Play, Microsoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 19.5 hours


Queer Eye 93% (Netflix)

What it is: The early aughts’ hit, boundary-pushing reality series Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, gets a makeover of its own with this charming, three-time Emmy-winning reboot on Netflix.

Why you should watch it: If any other series captured the world’s collective heart over the last year like Queer Eye did, we haven’t heard of it. Yes, its main hook lies in the fashionable, fabulous, and heartwarming makeovers the Queer Eye guys give Georgia men (and the occasional woman), but you’ll stick around for the playful banter and true, deep friendship between the main cast of industry experts. It all packs a surprisingly emotional punch, so stock up on tissues! Season 3 premieres March 15.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 12 hours


Billions 89% (Showtime)

What it is: Showtime’s Billions dramatizes the high-stakes world of Wall Street when Chuck Rhoades (Paul Giamatti), a U.S. attorney, sets his sights on bringing down hedge fund manager Bobby Axelrod (Homeland‘s Damian Lewis) for insider trading and other illegal proclivities. Talk about one-percenters.

Why you should watch it: Giamatti has built a career on playing the everyman, and here, he’s fighting for him. The actor’s turn as the hard-hitting U.S. attorney would be reason alone to watch (scenes of surprise BDSM and all), but Billions also boasts a timely, engrossing premise and firecracker performances from Lewis, Maggie Siff, Condola Rashad, and a bevy of other supporters that meet Giamatti mark for mark. Season 4 premieres March 17.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNow, Google Play, Hulu, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 36 hours


Jane The Virgin 100% (The CW)

What it is: It comes as no surprise that a series as sprawling and ambitious as Jane the Virgin has taken on many forms over the last four seasons, but the family-driven hourlong series begins when Jane, the titular character, is accidentally artificially inseminated.  

Why you should watch it: More than just a star-making vehicle for the incomparable Gina Rodriguez, Jane the Virgin is a dramedy like no other, rolling out bits of magical realism, vital cultural representation, female empowerment, and plenty of charm. It’s a series that wears its heart on its sleeve, and we can’t wait to see what its final installment has in store. Season 5 premieres March 27.

Where to watch it: AmazonFandangoNow, Google Play, MicrosoftNetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 57 hours


Happy! 84% (Syfy)

What it is: A small-screen adaptation of Grant Morrison and Darick Robertson’s graphic novel of the same name, Happy! follows a crooked, alcoholic cop-turned-hitman Nick Sax (Christopher Meloni) who inexplicably begins seeing his kidnapped daughter’s imaginary friend: a blue winged horse named Happy (voiced by Patton Oswalt). Together, they set out on a mission to find a Santa-dressed kidnapper on-the-loose.

Why you should watch it: “Happy” is one word for it, another is “weird.” Other words for it are “transporting,” or “hallucinogenic,” or “wild” — all meant in the best way. Unlike just about anything else on TV, Happy! demands your attention and promises a crazy ride. Season 2 premieres March 27.

Where to watch it: AmazonFandangoNow, Google Play, MicrosoftNetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 6 hours


Santa Clarita Diet 89% (Netflix)

What it is: We’ve seen the modern-day American layperson satirized to no end on the small screen, but we’ve never seen them with zombies. That’s where Santa Clarita Diet comes in. Sheila (Drew Barrymore) and Joel Hammond (Timothy Olyphant) are happily married real-estate agents living in the titular Californian town when Sheila unexpectedly becomes a bloodthirsty, flesh-craving, card-carrying member of the living dead.

Why you should watch it: Any excuse to watch Barrymore is A-OK in our book, but it’s even better when it’s a series as unique, fun, and — pardon the pun — biting as Santa Clarita Diet. Driven by its central mystery as much as it is its core cast of characters, it’s a suburban satire for all, not just fans of The Walking Dead. Season 3 premieres March 29.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 10 hours


Barry 99% (HBO)

What it is: Bill Hader stars as Barry Berman, a Midwestern hitman who, when traveling to Los Angeles for a job, unexpectedly takes an acting class and considers a career change.

Why you should watch it: Henry Winkler is gifted the kind of late-career role that the Happy Days TV veteran has long deserved in washed-up acting coach Gene Cousineau. (And he’s got the Emmy to prove it!) That in itself is reason enough to tune into Barry, but then there’s the title character himself. Hader has never been better as the hitman-turned-aspiring actor: circumstantially funny as a fish out of water, boasting leading-man gravitas as a morally torn hero, and even exuding an unexpected sex appeal as a kickass former Marine. Season 2 premieres March 31.

Where to watch it: AmazonFandangoNow, Google Play, HBO NowVudu

Commitment: Approx. 4 hours


Veep 93% (HBO)

What it is: Selina Meyer is an anti-heroine for the ages as a former senator and now Vice President of the United States who curses like a sailor and handles the things her predecessor never bothered to attend to.

Why you should watch it: There are few comedic performances as decorated as Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ turn in HBO and creator Armando Iannucci’s Veep (a record-tying five Emmy wins for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for the same role, to be exact). But still, she and the series seem to get better year after year. While Veep started out as a hilarious satire of the goings-on in our country’s capitol, it’s proven over the last few seasons to be more of a premonitory look at what’s to come in the West Wing — making it as relevant and darkly funny as ever. The seventh and final season premieres March 31.

Where to watch it: AmazonFandangoNow, Google Play, HBO Now, MicrosoftVudu

Commitment: About 29 hours


Thumbnail photo courtesy Patrick Ecclesine/CBS; Isabella Vosmikova/HBO; Jan Thijs/Starz/Fremantle

Julia Roberts in Homecoming (Amazon Prime)

(Photo by © Amazon)

Julia Roberts’ turn in the mind-bending Amazon series Homecoming marked the A-list actress’ debut as a series lead. She’s not the only big-screen actor drawn to the TV and streaming boom in serialized entertainment: Benicio Del Toro makes his debut in the Ben Stiller–directed Showtime miniseries Escape at Dannemora, and Avengers: Infinity War star Elizabeth Olsen is getting raves as a grieving widow in Facebook Watch’s Sorry for Your Loss.

Upcoming projects include Helen Mirren’s Catherine the Great miniseries, Jennifer Connelly in FX’s Snowpiercer, Henry Cavill in Netflix’s adaptation of The Witcher, Russell Crowe in Showtime’s Roger Ailes miniseries, and Chris Pine’s TNT drama collaboration with Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins, I Am the Night. Even three-time Oscar winner (out of 21 nominations) Meryl Streep joins Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman in the upcoming second season of HBO’s Big Little Lies. And that’s just the shortlist.

Below, find Rotten Tomatoes’ accounting of the best small-screen debuts for A-list movie stars from the past few years, ranked by season 1 Tomatometer scores (that is, the season on which they  made their TV or streaming debut). A note: Many actors got their start on TV, and while we included stars with a few guest parts on their resume, anyone with a significant number of TV credits (or a series regular or recurring role on a show, no matter how short-lived) got cut.


Julia Roberts, Homecoming: Season 1 (2018) 98%

Famous For: Pretty Woman (1990) 64%Notting Hill (1999) 83%, Erin Brockovich (2000) 85%

How She Fared on TV: While the Oscar winner has filmed a few one-off TV guest spots (a 1999 episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and the two-part former series finale of Murphy Brown) and starred in Ryan Murphy’s HBO movie The Normal Heart, Roberts’ starring role in Sam Esmail’s podcast-turned-streaming drama Homecoming, Certified Fresh with a 99% Tomatometer score, is her first true venture as a lead in a series. Critics agree that Homecoming is “an impressive small-screen debut for the actress, balancing a haunting mystery with a frenetic sensibility that grips and doesn’t let go.”


Winona Ryder, Stranger Things: Season 1 (2016) 97%

Famous For: Beetlejuice (1988) 85%, Heathers (1989) 93%, Black Swan (2010) 85%

How She Fared on TV: The ’80s superstar first dipped her toe into TV with the Oscar Isaac–starring HBO miniseries Show Me a Hero, but made a splash as the grieving mother of a missing son in Netflix’s nostalgia-heavy phenomenon Stranger Things. Both seasons of the horror series are Certified Fresh at 96% and 94%, respectively, but the first garnered fan and critical attention with a performance that the Village Voice’s Alan Scherstuhl described as “continually inventive in her grief” and Vulture’s Jen Cheney described as “grounded and convincing in Joyce’s moments of anger and quiet resolve.”


Elizabeth Olsen, Sorry For Your Loss: Season 1 (2018) 94%

Famous For: Martha Marcy May Marlene (2011) 90%, Kill Your Darlings (2013) 76%, Avengers: Infinity War (2018) 85%

How She Fared on TV: The actress’ feature film debut, Martha Marcy May Marlene, was Certified Fresh with a 90% Tomatometer score, and she’s now a critical success in her TV debut as well. The Facebook Watch series — yes, Facebook — was Certified Fresh at 95%, with Sophie Gilbert of The Atlantic saying that Olsen “anchors the story with her extraordinary portrayal of Leigh, a writer and barre instructor in Los Angeles whose husband has unexpectedly died.” Olsen is an executive producer of the series, which premiered in September 2018, and was actively involved in its development.


Reese Witherspoon, Big Little Lies: Season 1 (2017) 93%

Famous For: Election (1999) 92%, Walk the Line (2005) 82%, Wild (2014) 88%

How She Fared on TV: With her production company, Hello Sunshine, Witherspoon shepherded her TV debut Big Little Lies through the development process to the small screen. The first season featured the actress’ performance as a Type-A mom in “a precise turn with sharp, informed decisions made time and time again, in a role perfectly built for Witherspoon’s talent,” wrote Indiewire’s Ben Travers. She’ll next star in the series’ second season, as well as in Apple’s first TV series, a morning-show drama alongside Jennifer Aniston.


Maggie Gyllenhaal, The Honorable Woman: Season 1 () 91%

Famous For: Secretary (2002) 77%The Dark Knight (2008) 94%, Crazy Heart (2009) 90%

How She Fared on TV: Gyllenhaal’s first TV outing, 2014 miniseries The Honorable Woman, was Certified Fresh with the Critics Consensus that she gave an “enthralling performance.” In HBO’s The Deuce, both seasons of which are Certified Fresh at 93% and 99% respectively, critics say she carries the series in “a tour de force performance.”


Penelope Cruz, The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace (2018) 89%

Famous For: All About My Mother (1999) 98%, Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) 81%

How She Fared on TV: Cruz got real-life friend Donatella Versace’s blessing to portray her in the second season of FX’s American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace. Playing the slain fashion designer’s grieving sister, Cruz’s small role was overshadowed by a career-defining performance for star Darren Criss, who went on to win an Emmy for his role. Rolling Stone’s Rob Sheffield called Cruz “simply fearsome” and “no caricature” as the designer. Her version of Versace is “ruthless in her resolve to keep the House of Versace alive as an aesthetic.”


Laura Dern, Enlightened 87%

Famous For: Blue Velvet (1986) 94%, Jurassic Park (1993) 92%, Wild (2014) 88%

How She Fared on TV: One of the first major stars to jump to TV in the peak TV era, Dern starred in the before-its-time HBO series Enlightened as a woman who returns to her life after a public breakdown and time at a mental-health retreat. Both seasons of the canceled-too-soon series were Certified Fresh. “I was blown away by how Dern is able to keep Amy on this knife’s edge between maniacal optimism and seething anger, and there’s no telling which direction she might go at any moment. It’s exhilarating to watch,” wrote Meredith Blake of The AV Club.


Matthew McConaughey, True Detective: Season 1 (2014) 87%

Famous For: Dazed and Confused (1993) 92%Dallas Buyers Club (2013) 92%, Interstellar (2014) 72%

How He Fared on TV: The first season of the anthology series starred McConaughey and Woody Harrelson as Louisiana detectives investigating a murder over a 17-year span. NPR’s Eric Deggans said the series, which debuted the same year the actor won an Oscar for Dallas Buyers Club, “has the feel of an indie film spread over eight episodes starring two of the best character actors in the business.” Season 2 of the series — which again mined the film community, starred Colin Farrell, Vince Vaughn, and Rachel McAdams — did not live up to the first.


Cillian Murphy, Peaky Blinders: Season 1 (2013) 87%

Famous For: 28 Days Later (2002) 87%, The Dark Knight (2008) 94%, Sunshine (2007) 77%

How He Fared on TV: Murphy, whose only other TV credit is the 2001 miniseries The Way We Live Now, takes the lead as a crime boss hoping to move up in the world, in this 1919-set period drama that streams on Netflix in the United States. Chris Barton of the Los Angeles Times wrote, “This BBC effort set in post-WWI Birmingham, Britain, has more direct pleasures than the departed Boardwalk Empire thanks in part to a fresh, hellish setting and the reliable chill of Cillian Murphy, whose icy stare pairs well with the show’s grim Nick Cave soundtrack.”


Zooey Deschanel, New Girl: Season 1 (2011) 87%

Famous For: Almost Famous (2000) 89%, Elf (2003) 85%, (500) Days of Summer (2009) 85%

How She Fared on TV: Though she appeared in a few episodes of Weeds in 2006 and an episode of her sister’s series Bones in 2009, Deschanel didn’t fully commit to a lead role on TV until 2011’s New Girl. This is the performance that brought the world the adjective “adorkable,” and the first season was Certified Fresh at 86%. Critics Consensus is that “Deschanel ‘s offbeat style gets a worthy showcase in New Girl, and while It can get awfully cutesy at times, the show benefits from witty writing and a strong supporting cast.”


Benicio Del Toro, Season 1: Miniseries (2018) 90%

Famous For: Traffic (2000) 92%, Sicario (2015) 92%, Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) 91%

How He Fared on TV: Aside from just a couple of one-off roles in the late ’80s and early ’90s on shows like Miami Vice and Tales from the Crypt, Del Toro has made his career in the movies. The Oscar winner (for 2000’s Traffic) stars in the Ben Stiller–directed Showtime miniseries Escape at Dannemora, about a real-life 2015 prison break. Carlos Valladares of the San Francisco Chronicle said the series, which debuts November 18, “proves yet again that the miniseries is the site of the most engaging long-form storytelling in television today.”


Paul Giamatti, () %

Famous For: Sideways (2004) 97%, Cinderella Man (2005) 80%, Private Life (2018) 93%

How He Fared on TV: After starring in HBO’s John Adams miniseries (and a guest role on Downton Abbey and the memorable 12 Angry Men spoof on Inside Amy Schumer), Giamatti returned with his first true series in Showtime’s Billions, the first and third seasons of which are both Certified Fresh. Regarding Giamatti’s portrayal of the founding father, Tom Shales of the Washington Post wrote, “Nearly throughout, Giamatti’s performance is captivating, often poignantly so.”


Jude Law, The Young Pope: Miniseries (2016) 80%

Famous For: The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999) 83%, A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (2001) 75%Sherlock Holmes (2009) 69%

How He Fared on TV: Though Law’s TV debut encouraged plenty of bad jokes — you’ll never believe just how young this pope is! — the actor’s performance as the American-born, cigarette-smoking, Cherry Coke Zero-drinking pontificate (previously known as Lenny Belardo) earned plenty of praise. RogerEbert.com’s Brian Tallerico lauded Law’s “magnetic lead performance” and Entertainment Weekly’s Jeff Jensen wrote, “I’m transfixed by the sumptuous visual storytelling of creator and director Paolo Sorrentino and mesmerized by Law.”


Jessica Lange, American Horror Story: Murder House: Murder House (2011) 72%

Famous For: Tootsie (1982) 90%Cape Fear (1991) 74%, Big Fish (2003) 76%

How She Fared on TV: Ryan Murphy recruited the two-time Oscar winner (and six-time nominee) for his horror anthology American Horror Story, for which she won a Golden Globe and two Emmys. While the actress, who debuted on the small screen alongside Drew Barrymore in HBO TV movie Grey Gardens, left the series after four seasons, she returned in the latest, Apocalypse, and worked with Murphy again as Joan Crawford in the creator’s anthology series Feud: Bette and Joan. Lange’s first four seasons of AHS and Feud were all Certified Fresh, with Salon’s Melanie McFarland saying of Feud, “Lange and Sarandon hold the center with stunning likenesses of the legends they’re portraying, but the actresses also bring their inspirations down to Earth, tempering their decadent rages and vengeful spats with a gutting sense of loneliness that tempers its lightness in solemnity.”


Nicole Kidman, Top of the Lake: China Girl (2017) 72%

Famous For: Moulin Rouge (2001) 76%, The Hours (2002) 79%, Boy Erased (2018) 80%

How She Fared on TV: Kidman won a Golden Globe and an Emmy for her portrayal of ritzy California mom Celeste in HBO’s Big Little Lies, but her TV series debut came alongside Elisabeth Moss in the second season of Sundance Channel’s Top of the Lake. The Sydney-set series featured Kidman as the recently separated mother of a troubled teen girl. Slate’s Willa Paskin called Kidman “resplendent,” though the season itself got mixed reviews. Kidman also appeared alongside Clive Owen in the 2012 HBO movie Hemingway & Gellhorn.


Anna Faris, Mom: Season 1 (2013) 70%

Famous For: Scary Movie (2000) 52%, Lost in Translation (2003) 95%, The House Bunny (2008) 43%

How She Fared on TV: Aside from short stints on Friends and Entourage, Mom was Faris’ first leading role on TV. While costar Allison Janney has gotten most of the praise (and the award-season hardware), Andy Greenwald’s Grantland review noted that the “perfectly cast” Faris “kills from the opening scene,” and that the series was “the first multi-cam comedy to crack me up in a decade.”


Sean Penn, The First: Season 1 (2018) 66%

Famous For: Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) 78%, Dead Man Walking (1995) 95%, Milk (2008) 93%

How He Fared on TV: The two-time Oscar winner (and five-time nominee) has filmed (or voice recorded) cameos on comedies including Family Guy, Two and a Half Men, Friends, and The Larry Sanders Show (and, fun fact, was on two episodes of Little House on the Prairie as a kid). But his true TV commitment came in 2018 as an astronaut in the Hulu series about the first manned mission to Mars. While the series itself got mixed reviews, its Critics Consensus was that Penn “gives an intensely poignant performance as the driven but conflicted Tom Hagerty” in the slow-moving first season. He’ll next hit the small screen as the star of an HBO miniseries about seventh U.S. President Andrew Jackson.


Vince Vaughn, True Detective: Season 2 (2015) 62%

Famous For: Swingers (1996) 87%Wedding Crashers (2005) 76%, Four Christmases (2008) 25%

How He Fared on TV: Though Vaughn appeared in cameos in Sex and the City and Mr. Show (and appeared in a few bit TV parts in the earliest days of his career), his true TV debut came in the second season of HBO’s True Detective. The season didn’t garner the same acclaim as the first, with critics split on the season as a whole but praising its performances. Chuck Barney of the San Jose Mercury News wrote,“All of the lead actors dig deeply into their roles, with Farrell playing the wary, weary burnout to perfection, and Vaughn shifting into full-throttle intensity.”


Jane Fonda, The Newsroom

Famous For: Barbarella (1968) 74%, 9 to 5 (1980) 83%On Golden Pond (1981) 93%

How She Fared on TV: Aaron Sorkin brought Fonda to the small screen with his TV news drama The Newsroom, in which she played the strong-willed owner of cable news network ACN. But the real critical acclaim for her TV work comes with Netflix comedy Grace and Frankie, where, alongside Lily Tomlin, she plays the jilted wife of a husband who leaves her for the man with whom he’s been having an affair for decades. The first season got mixed reactions as a whole, but critics credited its “stellar cast” with bringing the series an “undeniable appeal.”


Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom

Famous For: The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985) 92%, Dumb & Dumber (1994) 68%, The Martian (2015) 91%

How He Fared on TV: Now a small-screen veteran, with Hulu’s 9/11 drama Looming Tower and Netflix’s Western miniseries Godless under his belt (both Certified Fresh, by the way), Daniels first made the jump to the small screen with Aaron Sorkin’s The Newsroom. Critics were mixed on the series, saying it had “good intentions and benefits from moments of stellar dialogue and a talented cast.”


Woody Allen, Crisis in Six Scenes: Miniseries (2016) 18%

Famous For: Annie Hall (1977) 96%Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) 91%, Blue Jasmine (2013) 91%

How He Fared on TV: Critics were not kind to the controversial writer and director’s TV debut, the 2016 Amazon series Crisis in Six Scenes. Among the scathing reviews were Dana Schwartz of the Observer’s critique that, “Woody Allen setting a new show in the sixties feels a little desperate, like he’s trying to physically yank back his glory days.” Wrote Sonia Saraiya of Variety, “it is hard to see the 80-year-old auteur as charming in the harsh light of the present.”

Some of 2017’s best new series are finally returning for round two this month, and we can’t wait to see what’s next. Catch up on those — plus a handful of favorite long-running offerings — below with our monthly roundup of what to binge.


The Good Fight 95% (CBS All Access)

What it is: Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) gets the leading lady treatment with CBS All Access’ hit spin-off of The Good Wife. Set one year after the events of that acclaimed series’ finale (and picking up on the morning of President Donald Trump’s storied inauguration), The Good Fight follows Lockhart after she’s forced out of her own firm with Maia Rindell (Game of ThronesRose Leslie) and joins up with Lucca Quinn (Cush Jumbo).

Why you should watch it: Sure, if you loved The Good Wife, you’ll love The Good Fight — but believe it or not, Baranski is better than ever here and finds exciting new shades to our beloved Lockhart. Season 2 premieres March 4.

Where to watch it: Amazon, CBS All AccessFandangoNowGoogle PlayMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 8.5 hours


Marvel - Jessica Jones 83% (Netflix)

Krysten Ritter in Marvel's Jessica Jones season 2 (David Giesbrecht/Netflix)

What it is: If you’re up to no good, Jessica Jones is the last person you’d want to bump into in a dark alleyway. The super-strong P.I. has thrown in her towel as a superhero and instead taken to bringing justice to New York City’s most nefarious by more traditional means — until a super-villain from her past named Kilgrave comes back into her life, that is.

Why you should watch it: Even if you’ve already seen Season 1 of Jessica Jones, and even if you got a much-needed fix from Marvel’s The Defenders last year, Krysten Ritter alone is worthy of repeat viewing for a quick catch-up before season 2 on March 8. Daring, crass, and ball-busting, she and her Jones take on a whole new significance in the era of Times Up and #MeToo. But most importantly, she’s addictively watchable, now more than ever.

Where to watch it: AmazonFandangoNowGoogle PlayMicrosoft, NetflixVudu

Commitment: Approx. 12 hours


Love 94% (Netflix)

What it is: This half-hour comedy from Judd Apatow and Lesley Arfin charts the unlikely relationship of goofy everyman Gus (Paul Rust) and the beautiful-but-flawed Mickey (Gillian Jacobs), both of whom live and work in Hollywood.

Why you should watch it: They say don’t judge a book by its cover, and particularly with Love, it’s best to not judge a series by its title, either. More a darkly comic look at 20-30something aimlessness, addiction, and the things we do to make a connection in the modern world, Love likely won’t leave you feeling all warm and fuzzy. What is worth loving, though, are stop-you-in-your-tracks performances from Community vet Jacobs and Rust. Season 3 premieres March 9.

Where to watch it: FandangoNowGoogle PlayNetflix

Commitment: Approx. 11 hours


Sneaky Pete 96% (Amazon)

What it is: Longtime character actor and standout supporter Giovanni Ribisi gets top-billing as “titular” conman Marius who, once out of prison, takes on the identity of his cellmate, Pete. On the run from a coldblooded mobster, Marius holes up with Pete’s unsuspecting small-town family.

Why you should watch it: This Amazon original series from creators David Shore and Bryan Cranston (who also co-stars as mobster Vince) will sneak up and floor you — and we don’t say that simply as a play on words. Each ensemble member (but especially Ribisi and series breakout Marin Ireland) delivers lived-in and moving dramatic turns with fast-paced scripts that don’t skimp on nuance of character. Sneaky Pete doesn’t have to con its way onto your must-watch list; it deserves to be there. Season 2 premieres March 9.

Where to watch it: AmazonFandangoNowGoogle PlayMicrosoft, Vudu

Commitment: Approx. 7.5 hours


Timeless 91% (NBC)

What it is: This time-hopping, sci-fi adventure series from creators Shawn Ryan and Eric Kripke stars Abigail Spencer, Malcolm Barrett, and Matt Lanter as a history professor, a scientist, and a soldier, respectively, who travel through time to stop another more sinister time traveler from altering the course of history.

Why you should watch it: Oftentimes, high-concept big swings from the networks take a little while to find their footing, but Timeless on NBC stormed out of the gate in fall 2016 as an admirably audacious drama with tricks up its sleeve to spare. Season 2 premieres March 11.

Where to watch it: AmazonFandangoNowGoogle Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 12 hours


Billions 89% (Showtime)

What it is: Showtime’s Billions dramatizes the high-stakes world of Wall Street when Chuck Rhoades, a U.S. attorney, sets his sights on bringing down hedge fund manager Bobby Axelrod for insider trading and other illegal proclivities.

Why you should watch it: Paul Giamatti has built a career on playing the everyman, and here, he’s fighting for him. Giamatti’s turn as the hard-hitting U.S. attorney Rhoades would be reason alone to watch (scenes of unexpected BDSM and all), but Billions also boasts a timely, engrossing premise and firecracker performances from Damian Lewis and Maggie Siff that meet Giamatti mark for mark. Season 3 premieres March 25.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNowGoogle Play, HuluVudu

Commitment: Approx. 24 hours


Silicon Valley 94% (HBO)

What it is: This decorated HBO comedy from creators John Altschuler, Mike Judge, and Dave Krinsky is the story of wunderkind coder Richard Hendricks (Thomas Middleditch) as he and partner Erlich Bachman (T.J. Miller) struggle to  to get their startup off the ground during Northern California’s tech boom.

Why you should watch it: Few shows pack as many laughs-per-episode as Silicon Valley. Through its hilarious portrayal of a company on the rise, it also taps into the real-world “brotopia” of the West Coast’s tech industry in more than just name with an assortment of memorable (and in the case of Middleditch, Emmy-nominated) performances across the board.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNowGoogle Play, HBO NowMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 19 hours


The Americans 96% (FX)

Holly Taylor, Matthew Rhys, Keri Russell in The Americans (Patrick Harbron/FX)

What it is: Now entering its sixth and final season, this slow-burning espionage series stars real-life couple Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as married KGB spies infiltrating the nation’s capital at the height of the Cold War.

Why you should watch it: We know, we know: You’ve heard enough about Russia in today’s headlines, so why should you want to watch a show about KGB spies infiltrating the States? Trust us: The Americans isn’t just any show. In Russell and Rhys, the FX critical darling boasts two of television’s finest performers matched with airtight scripts and sublime direction and cinematography well deserving of its slew of Emmy and Golden Globe nominations over its five-year run. Season 6 premieres March 28.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNowGoogle PlayMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 48 hours


A Series of Unfortunate Events 96% (Netflix)

What it is: Those poor, poor Baudelaire orphans — always getting caught up in events that are, well, unfortunate. Netflix’s whimsically dark series follows Violet, Klaus, and Sunny who, after they’re parents’ death, are put in the care of an evil distant cousin, Count Olaf, who’s set on getting his hands on their sizable inheritance.

Why you should watch it: Here, Neil Patrick Harris is doing more than just stealing the show here, as he did on for nine seasons on How I Met Your Mother. He is the show, making each master-of-disguise get-up as the menacing Olaf more beguiling than the one before it. It’s just an added bonus that the sets, music, and just about everything else about this series is technically dazzling.

Where to watch it: Netflix

Commitment: Approx. 6 hours


Legion 91% (FX)

The cast of Legion (Michelle Faye/FX)

What it is: While Legion is among the most original — and, as a result, undefinable — series on TV today, in the simplest of terms, it’s the story of psych-ward patient David Haller (Dan Stevens) and his sidekick-turned-nemesis Lenny (Aubrey Plaza) as David more fully becomes what he’s always known himself to be: a mutant.

Why you should watch it: To anyone who says they’re tiring of the superhero genre overtaking film and TV, we say, “Have you seen Legion?” Noah Hawley’s absolutely singular X-Men–based vision is a mind-bending and engrossing head-scratcher that’s well worth committing to. And committing is exactly what Stevens and Plaza do with their no-holds-barred, fearless performances. Season 2 premieres April 3.

Where to watch it: Amazon, FandangoNowGoogle Play, HuluMicrosoftVudu

Commitment: Approx. 6 hours

As we ramp up into summer, we reflect upon the 2016 winter/spring season, which brought with it a handful of top-notch TV shows worthy of Certified Fresh status. Whether they be series premieres or new seasons of returning shows, we’ve got all of them here in one place for you. Did your favorites make the list? Sound off in the comments below.

It’s time for our weekly countdown of the Winter TV premieres! Here are the best new shows for the week of Friday, January 15th. See how this week’s shows Colony, Mercy Street, Shadowhunters, Second Chance, Billions, Teachers, and Angie Tribeca stack up against each other on the Tomatometer!

tv collage copy

 

Here it is: the ever-growing list of mid-season premieres for winter and spring, 2016. Included here are series and season premieres, as well as returns of shows that will have been on hiatus for a couple of months or more. So mark your calendars now. Will “peak TV” continue peaking in 2016? You be the judge.


January | February | March | April | TBA 


 January

Friday, Jan. 1
Sherlock: The Abominable Bride special event, 9 p.m., PBS

Sunday, Jan. 3
Galavant season two premiere, 8 p.m., ABC
Downton Abbey season six premiere, 8 pm, PBS
Cooper Barrett’s Guide to Surviving Life series premiere, FOX
Bordertown series premiere, 9:30 p.m., FOX

 

galavant Galavant

 

Monday, Jan. 4
The Bachelor, season 20 premiere, 8 p.m., ABC
The Biggest Loser season 17 premiere, 9 p.m., NBC

Tuesday, Jan. 5
The New Girl season five premiere, 8 p.m., ABC
Teen Wolf season five return, 9 p.m., MTV
The Shannara Chronicles series premiere, 10 p.m., MTV

Wednesday, Jan. 6
American Idol season 15 premiere, 8 p.m., FOX
Mike & Molly season six premiere, 8 p.m., CBS
American Crime season two premiere, 10 p.m., ABC
It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia season 11 premiere, 10 p.m., FXX
Man Seeking Woman season two premiere, 10:30 p.m., FXX

Thursday, Jan. 7
Angel from Hell series premiere, 9:30 p.m., CBS
Beyond the Tank season two premiere, 10 p.m., ABC
Shades of Blue series premiere, 10 p.m., NBC
Todd Margaret season three premiere, 10 p.m., IFC

Sunday, Jan. 10
Shameless season six premiere, 9 p.m., SHO

Tuesday, Jan. 12
Pretty Little Liars season six return, 8 p.m., Freeform
Shadowhunters series premiere, 9 p.m., Freeform

 

shadow Shadowhunters

 

Wednesday, Jan. 13
Second Chance series premiere, 9 p.m., FOX
Younger season two premiere, 10 p.m., TV Land
Teachers series premiere, 11 p.m., TV Land

Thursday, Jan. 14
Colony series premiere, 10 p.m., USA
Workaholics season six premiere, 10 p.m., Comedy Central
Idiotsitter series premiere, 10:30 p.m., Comedy Central

 

colony Colony

 

Friday, Jan. 15
Hell’s Kitchen season 15 premiere, 9 p.m., FOX

Sunday, Jan. 17
Angie Tribeca series premiere, 9 p.m., TBS
Billions series premiere, 10 p.m., Showtime
Mercy Street series premiere, 10 p.m., PBS

 

angie Angie Tribeca

 

Monday, Jan. 18
War & Peace series premiere, 9 p.m., A&E, Lifetime, History
Almost Royal season two premiere, 10 p.m., BBC America
Hit the Floor season three premiere, 10 p.m., VH1

Tuesday, Jan. 19
Marvel’s Agent Carter season two premiere, 9 p.m., ABC

Thursday, Jan. 21
DC’s Legends of Tomorrow series premiere, 8 p.m., CW
The 100 season three premiere, 9 p.m., CW
Baskets series premiere, 10 p.m., FX
London Spy series US premiere, 10 p.m., BBC America
Portlandia season six premiere, 10 p.m., IFC
Dark Net series premiere, 11 p.m., Showtime

Friday, Jan. 22
Chelsea Does series premiere, Netflix
Mad Dogs series premiere, Amazon Studios
Children’s Hospital season seven premiere, 11 p.m., Comedy Central, Adult Swim

Saturday, Jan. 23
Black Sails season three, 9 p.m., Starz
Beowulf series premiere, 10 p.m., Esquire

Sunday, Jan. 24
The X-Files season 10 premiere, 10 p.m., FOX

 

x The X-Files

 

Monday, Jan. 25
The Fosters season three return, 8 p.m., Freeform
American Dad! season 12 premiere, 8:30 p.m., TBS
Lucifer series premiere, 9 p.m., FOX
The Magicians series premiere, 9 p.m., SyFy
Recovery Road series premiere, 9 p.m., Freeform

Tuesday, Jan. 26
Outsiders series premiere, 9 p.m., WGN

Wednesday, Jan. 27
Lucha Underground season two premiere, 9 p.m., El Rey
Suits season five return, 10 p.m., USA

Thursday, Jan. 28
You, Me and the Apocalypse series premiere, 8 p.m., NBC

Friday, Jan. 29
The Vampire Diaries season seven return, 8 p.m., CW
The Originals season three return, 9 p.m., CW

Sunday, Jan. 31
The Venture Bros season six premiere, midnight, Cartoon Network/Adult Swim

Back to Top


 February


Tuesday, Feb. 2
The Muppets season one return, 8 p.m., ABC
American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson series premiere, 10 p.m., FX

 

oj American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson

 

Wednesday, Feb. 3
Madoff series premiere, 8 p.m., ABC
Young & Hungry season three premiere, 8 p.m., Freeform
Baby Daddy season five premiere, 8:30 p.m., Freeform

Friday, Feb. 5
Sleepy Hollow season three return, 8 p.m., FOX
Animals series premiere, 11:30 p.m., HBO

Monday, Feb. 8
Castle season eight return, 10 p.m., ABC

Tuesday, Feb. 9
Tosh.0 season eight return, 10 p.m., Comedy Central
Not Safe with Nikki Glaser series premiere, 10:30 p.m., Comedy Central

Thursday, Feb. 11
Grey’s Anatomy season 12 return, 8 p.m., ABC
Scandal season five return, 9 p.m., ABC
How to Get Away with Murder season two return, 10 p.m., ABC
Those Who Can’t series premiere, 10:30 p.m., TruTV

Friday, Feb. 12
The Amazing Race season 28 return, 8 p.m., CBS

Sunday, Feb. 14
The Walking Dead season six return, 9 p.m., AMC
Vinyl series premiere, 9 p.m., HBO

Monday, Feb. 15
11.22.63 series premiere, Hulu
Major Crimes season four return, 9 p.m., TNT
Better Call Saul season two premiere, 10 p.m., AMC
Bitten season three premiere 11 p.m., Syfy

 

major crimes Major Crimes

 

Tuesday, Feb. 16
The New Yorker Presents series premiere, Amazon Studios
Rizzoli & Isles season seven premiere, 9 p.m., TNT

Wednesday, Feb. 17
Survivor season 32 premiere, 8 p.m., CBS
Broad City season three premiere, 10 p.m., Comedy Central

Thursday, Feb. 18
Vikings season four premiere, 8 p.m., History

Friday, Feb. 19
Love series premiere, Netflix

Sunday, Feb. 21
Girls season five premiere, 10 p.m., HBO
Togetherness season two premiere, 10:30 p.m., HBO

Thursday, Feb. 25
Prey miniseries premiere, 10 p.m., BBC America

Friday, Feb. 26
Fuller House series premiere, Netflix

Monday, Feb. 29
Gotham season two return, 8 p.m., FOX
The Voice season 10 premiere, 8 p.m., NBC
Blindspot season one return, 10 p.m., NBC
Back to Top


 March


Wednesday, Mar. 2
Rosewood season one return, 8 p.m., Fox
The Real O’Neals series premiere, 8:30 p.m., ABC
CSI: Cyber season two return, 10 p.m., CBS
Hap and Leonard series premiere 10 p.m., Sundance

Thursday, Mar. 3
The Family series premiere, 9 p.m., ABC

Friday, Mar. 4
House of Cards season four, Netflix

Sunday, Mar. 6
Once Upon a Time season five return, 8 p.m., ABC
I Am Cait season two premiere, 9 p.m., E!
Quantico season one return, 10 p.m., ABC

Monday, Mar. 7
Bates Motel season four premiere, 9 p.m., A&E
Damien series premiere, 10 p.m., A&E

 

damien Damien

Tuesday, Mar. 8
Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. season three return, 9 p.m., ABC
Of Kings and Prophets series premiere, 10 p.m., ABC

Wednesday, Mar. 9
The Carmichael Show season two preview, 10 p.m., NBC
Underground series premiere, 10 p.m., WGN

Thursday, Mar. 10
60 Days In series premiere, 9 p.m., A&E

Friday, Mar. 11
Bosch season two premiere, Amazon
The Characters series premiere, Netflix
Flaked series premiere, Netflix
Party Over Here series premiere, 11 p.m., FOX

Sunday, Mar. 13
And Then There Were None miniseries US premiere, 8 p.m., Lifetime
The Carmichael Show season two premiere, 9 p.m., NBC

Tuesday, Mar. 15
Crowded series preview episodes, 10:00 p.m., NBC
Faking It season three premiere, 10:30 p.m., MTV

Wednesday, Mar. 16
Happy Valley season two premiere, Netflix
Schitt’s Creek season two premiere, 8 p.m., POP
Nashville season four return, 9 p.m., ABC
Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders series premiere, 10 p.m., CBS
The Americans season four premiere, 10 p.m., FX

 

nash Nashville

Friday, Mar. 18
Marvel’s Daredevil season two premiere, Netflix

Sunday, Mar. 20
Crowded series premiere, 9:30 pm, NBC

Monday, Mar. 21
Dancing with the Stars season 22 premiere, 8 p.m., ABC

Tuesday, Mar. 22
Heartbeat series preview, 9 p.m., NBC
Stitchers season two premiere, 10 p.m., Freeform

Wednesday, Mar. 23
Heartbeat series premiere, 8 p.m., NBC
Rogue season four premiere, 9 p.m., DirecTV
The Carbonaro Effect season two premiere , 10 p.m., TruTV

Sunday, Mar. 27
Grantchester season two premiere, 9 p.m., PBS
Mr. Selfridge season four premiere, 10 p.m., PBS

Thursday, Mar. 24
The Catch series premiere, 10 p.m., ABC

Wednesday, Mar. 30
The Path series premiere, Hulu
Empire season two return, 9 p.m., FOX
Lopez series premiere, 10 p.m., TVLand
The Soul Man season five, 10:30 p.m., TV Land

 

emp Empire

Thursday, Mar. 31
Archer season seven premiere, FX
Rush Hour series premiere, 10 p.m., CBS

Back to Top


 April


Friday, Apr. 1
The Ranch season premiere, Netflix
Banshee season four premiere, Cinemax
Motive season three premiere (US), 10 p.m., USA
Wynonna Earp series premiere, 10 p.m., SyFy

Sunday, Apr. 3
Call the Midwife season five premiere, 8 p.m., PBS

Thursday, Apr. 7
The Odd Couple season two premiere, 8:30 p.m., CBS

odd cou The Odd Couple

Friday, Apr. 8
Catastrophe season two premiere, Amazon

Saturday, Apr. 9
Outlander season two premiere, 9 p.m., Starz

Sunday, Apr. 10
The Girlfriend Experience series premiere, 8 p.m., Starz
House of Lies season five premiere, 9 p.m., Showtime
Dice series premiere, 9:30 p.m., Showtime
Fear the Walking Dead season two premiere, 10 p.m., AMC

Monday, Apr. 11
The Detour series premiere, 9 p.m., TBS
Hunters series premiere, 10 p.m., SyFy

Tuesday, Apr. 12
Ajin: Demi-Human series premiere, Netflix
The Mindy Project season four return, Hulu
Game of Silence series premiere, 10:00 p.m., NBC

Wednesday, Apr. 13
The Last Panthers series premiere, 10 p.m., SundanceTV

Thursday, Apr. 14
Bones season 11 return, 8 p.m., FOX
Orphan Black season four premiere, 10 p.m., BBC America

Friday, Apr. 15
Cuckoo season three US premiere, Netflix
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt season two premiere, Netflix

Monday, Apr. 18
12 Monkeys season two premiere, 9 p.m., SyFy

Tuesday, Apr. 19
Containment series premiere, 9 p.m., CW
The Night Manager miniseries premiere, AMC

Wednesday, Apr. 20
Deadbeat series 3 premiere, Hulu

Sunday, Apr. 24
Game of Thrones season six premiere, 9 p.m., HBO
Rebellion miniseries premiere, 9 p.m., Sundance
Silicon Valley season three premiere, 10 p.m., HBO
Veep season five premiere, 10:30 p.m., HBO

Monday, Apr. 25
Turn season three premiere, 10 p.m., AMC

Back to Top


TBA


The Last Man on Earth season two return, FOX

Back to Top

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