TORONTO: Reviews of "Borat," "Paris, Je T'aime," And More

by | September 13, 2006 | Comments

The Toronto International Film Festival has a lot of movies that are making their premieres, but some have screened at Sundance and Cannes. Read on for our RT reviews from the archives.

Of the movies we saw at Cannes, "Borat" (or, as it is now subtitled, "Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan") has made the biggest splash in Toronto. It’s been critically well received, and its tasteless, uproarious humor has delighted (and in some cases, divided) audiences at the festival. Read our review here.

Sacha Baron Cohen as bad (and offensive) as he wants to be in "Borat."

In addition, we have reviews of the Scottish thriller "Red Road (review)," the anthology film "Paris, Je T’aime (review)," the dark Norwegian dramedy "Lights in the Dusk (review)," Lou Ye’s "Summer Palace (review)" (which has gotten the director in a heap of trouble in China), and the haunting, half-animated "Princess (review)" each of which screened at Cannes and are getting looks here. And saw the punk documentary "American Hardcore (review)" at Sundance, and interviewed filmmakers Paul Rachman and Steven Blush.