Studios Preparing for Summer SAG Strike

Also: A glimpse at "Michael Bay jail."

by | February 29, 2008 | Comments

The writers’ strike may be over, but the studios aren’t done dealing with this year’s labor headaches — and with a potential Screen Actors Guild walkout looming this summer, they’re playing things as close to the vest as possible.

That’s the gist of a recent report from Variety, in which the problems facing filmmakers are laid out in painful detail. According to the article, “Hollywood majors are refusing to schedule new start dates on films that can’t complete shooting by June 30″ — which leaves, in the words of one unnamed studio head, “everything up in the air.”

The strike is far from certain, but hey, we said that about the writers’ stoppage not too long ago — which is why films such as Steven Spielberg‘s The Trial of the Chicago 7 are having their starts delayed. The uncertainty has led Michael Bay, for one, to take extra safeguards. Talking about Transformers 2, Bay tells Variety that he’s taking no chances with screenwriters Ehren Kruger, Alex Kurtzman, and Roberto Orci:

“They did a detailed outline before the writer’s strike, and now they are in Michael Bay jail, holed up in a hotel and working feverishly. We’re paying for a beautiful suite and they are getting a lot of work done. Hiring three writers was unusual, but it has been a godsend in getting us to where we need to be. Somehow you find a way to get it done.”

Other films, such as Terminator Salvation: The Future Begins and Angels & Demons, are making adjustments to try and compensate for any delays. According to Variety, the Terminator crew signed agreements specifying how and when they’d leave and return to the set in the event of a strike, while Angels & Demons will film its exterior and interior sequences in separate blocks:

Director Ron Howard will spend three weeks shooting all of the film’s exterior scenes. The rest of the film will be shot on Sony soundstages, where sets will wait, if necessary, until an actor’s strike is over. That allowed Sony to somewhat contain the costs to halt and re-start the picture.

To read more on how the potential strike is affecting production schedules, follow the link below!

Source: Variety

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